Tokyo Futures, 1868-2020: City of Symbiosis?

Symposium

The-forest-of-meiji-jingu-shinto-shrine-in-the-heart-of-tokyo-photo-by-takehiko-sato-page_medium

The Forest of Meiji Jingu (Shinto Shrine) in the heart of Tokyo. (Photo: Takehiko Sato)

In 2020 Tokyo will host the Olympics. Japan is looking at the Olympics not merely as an international sports festival but also as a process which will help her to assess how the Japanese nation and its role in the world will be reshaped in future.
Between 2015 and 2016, we delivered a series of six lectures in Japan and the UK on the themes of ‘nature’, ‘city’ and ‘art’ in order to reflect on the history of Tokyo and consider its future, using the Meiji period, which marks the starting point of modern Japan, as a temporal framework and the Meiji Jingu, which was constructed as the symbol of the period, as a physical framework. The concepts of nature, city and arts were all fundamental in the modernization of Meiji Japan and played an important role in the formation of Japanese national identity. This symposium will consider the outcome of the first stage lectures by linking the three elements together to debate whether Tokyo could become a city of symbiosis.

Keynote lecture 1
‘The Adaptable City: Designing for Uncertainty’
Professor Jeremy Till, Head of Central Saint Martins and Pro-Vice-Chancellor of University of the Arts London

Keynote lecture 2
‘Tokyo Futures: Symbiosis between Low and High’
Professor Ken Tadashi Oshima, University of Washington

Panel Discussion
‘City of Festivity: Tokyo 2020’
Discussants:
Professor Izumi Kuroishi, Aoyama Gakuin University
Kohei Nawa, Artist and Associate Professor, Kyoto University of the Arts and Design

Chair:
Professor Toshio Watanabe, TrAIN, University of the Arts London and Sainsbury Institute, University of East Anglia

MC:
Dr Yoshio Imaizumi, Senior Research Fellow, Meiji Jingu Intercultural Research Institute

The lectures and discussion will be simultaneously interpreted into Japanese and English.

This symposium is co-organised by the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures, the Meiji Jingu Intercultural Research Institute, and TrAIN, University of the Arts London with Aoyama Gakuin University, and supported by the Toshiba International Foundation.
http://sainsbury-institute.org/
http://www.meijijingu.or.jp/english/miri/about/index.html
http://www.arts.ac.uk/research/ual-research-centres/train/
http://www.aoyama.ac.jp/en/
http://www.toshiba.co.jp/about/tifo/eng/

Links