Forgotten Japonisme - Research Outcome

JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL INSTITUTE OF BRITISH ARCHITECTS

Volumes 26-47

November 1918 - October 1940

A LISTING OF REFERENCES:

MODERNISM - JAPAN - WELLS COATES

Dr Anna Basham
Research Centre for Transnational Art, Identity and Nation (TrAIN)
Chelsea College of Art and Design
University of the Arts London


R.I.B.A. Journal Volume 26 : November 1918 – October 1919 p. vii The Library Additions: 5th October 1918 - 15th October 1919 Tokio – Institute of Japanese Architects – Journal. 1a. 80 Tokio 1918-19.

p. 13 Living Architecture. By Professor W. R. Lethaby [F.] Extract from No. IV. Of the series of articles by Professor Lethaby Now appearing in the Builder under the title “A National Architecture.” Concrete seems to be a poor building material … I have no love for modernism as such, and fain would hide my head in the sands of the past, but I cannot help seeing that the courageous mind will shape even seemingly hopeless materials to its purpose … Whenever our buildings are again designed for their purpose as directly as a fiddle, a gun or even a motor or airplane, they will be romantic once more.

R.I.B.A. Journal Volume 27 : November 1919 – October 1920 pp. 209-210 Cranmore Incised Lacquer Work On view for a few days in the Institute Galleries are specimens of some pleasing decorative work based on Chinese incised lacquer, commonly known as coromandel work, which has been developed by two disabled soldiers working at Cranmore Hall, Shepton Mallet, under the direction of Sir Richard Paget Bart. [Hon. A.] … The process of application of the lacquer also differs from the Chinese and Japanese in that the lacquer is applied hot …

p. 321 Books Received Landscape Architecture: A Comprehensive Classification Scheme for Books, Plans, Photographs, Notes and other Collected Material with Combined Alphabetic Topic Index and List of Subject Headings. By Henry Vincent Hubbard, Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture at Harvard University, and Theodora Kimball, Librarian of the School of Landscape Architecture at Harvard University. Roy. 80. [Cambridge: Harvard University Press].

pp. 356-357 The Folly of Modern Art Sir Reginald Blomfield, R.A., Litt.D. [F.], delivered the fifth annual Lecture on Aspects of Art under the Henriette Hertz Trust, to the members of the British Academy on the 5th inst. Taking as his subject “The Tangled Skein; Art in England, 1800 to 1920,” Sir Reginald said that one must admit that all was not well with the Arts, and that in regard to the intellectual background, the point of view from which art should be approached, appreciated, and practised, we were worse off in the year 1920 than we were a hundred years ago … The papers lately announced the presence in a London gallery of a picture which the critics assured them transcended all contemporary art, and this was followed up by an exhibition of the work of a well-known or, he must be permitted to say, notorious French painter … The public were told that this was no mere presentation of life, but life itself; a revelation, as it were, or some quintessential mystery of existence …

p. 459 Obituary – Josiah Conder [F.] Josiah Conder (of Tokyo, Japan), who died on the 21st June, in his 68th year, was elected an Associate of the Institute in 1878, and Fellow in 1884. In 1876 he was awarded the Soam[sic.] Medallion for a Design of a Country House. Mr. Conder went to Japan in 1876, and the following particulars of his career are culled from the Japanese Gazette and the Japan Times and Mail …

p. 474 The Late Dr. Conder [F.] (ante, p. 459) … Conder was a student of architecture who wasted no energy in fancy-flights, but grimly stuck to whatever he had to do, soon proving himself a man who could be relied on to carry through whatever he had deliberately undertaken; and his enviable capability for getting work done to time was only in keeping with his characteristic thoroughness … No wonder that his fine qualities were appreciated by our friends the Japanese. Walter Millard [A.]

R.I.B.A. Journal Volume 28 : November 1920 – October 1921 pp. 1-6 Inaugural Address by the President, John W. Simpson , Membre Corr. De l’Institut de France. Delivered at the General Meeting, 1st November 1920. p. 3 … We, cheaper and easier travel abetting, have had spread before us an architectural panorama of the whole world through seven thousand years of time – Egypt, Crete, China, Japan, Mexico, India, to say nothing of Spain and the less-visited parts of Europe.

p. 78 Minutes III – The Third General Meeting of the Session 1920-21 held Monday 27 November 1920 at 8 pm. The Hon. Secretary formally announced the decease of Josiah Conder, Associate 1878, Fellow 1884 of Tokyo, Japan.

pp. 249-256 A Talk About Contemporary British Architecture and its Immediate Ancestry by H. S. Goodhart-Rendel. Read before the Manchester Society of Architects. 10th November 1920 p. 251 … For heaven’s sake don’t let us attempt yet another revival! If we go to Paris, let us learn from the living men how to do the work of our own day. p. 256 … And yet the reaction from this school which followed in the ‘nineties was not towards architectural planning. It was rather towards a sort of elaborate baldness in design. This curious movement can best be studied in the pages of the Studio, where will be found fervent exhortations to the art of architecture to strip off all its garments and ride through the streets like Lady Godiva for the common weal …

p. 341 Report of the Council for the Official Year 1920-1921 Obituary. The Loss by death have been as follows: Conder: Josiah.

p. 369 Art in Common Life. 23rd April 1921

p. 391-394 Character in Modern Architecture by Prof. C.H. Reilly. p. 393 … This brings me to my last and final point. In the absence of tradition how, for the general good, are we to restrain the individualism from which we are suffering? Abolish it we cannot and would not. If we did the architect would cease to be an artist and become a machine hack … Now in the complicated and self-conscious art of modern architecture it is only by a knowledge of the precedents established by past forms for certain predicaments that the ordinary architect can hope to give the right character to his buildings … p. 394 It is a far happier and a more profitable state for most men to feel that they are part of a great movement than to be isolated prophets crying in the wilderness and using a language which no one understands.

p. 593 The Great Cities of the World. 24th September 1921 The Garden Cities and Town Planning Association are arranging a first series of illustrated lectures on the “Great Cities of the World” to be delivered at King’s College, Strand, at. 5.30 p.m., on the dates mentioned below … Lectures on Washington, Brussels, Glasgow, and Tokio will be given during 1922 …

R.I.B.A. Journal Volume 29 : November 1921 – October 1922 pp.191-192 Presentation to Professor W. R. Lethaby on his 65th birthday. In acknowledging the address Professor Lethaby said:- … In a way, I love most art, from Egyptian to Japanese, but there are few things which suggest to me some more inward harmony and contentment than the rest …

R.I.B.A. Journal Volume 30 : November 1922 – October 1923 pp. 17-18 Reviews Japanese Temples and their Treasures. Compiled by the Department of the Interior, Imperial Japanese Government. 3 Vols. [Published Tokyo MCMX] Mr. G. Kiralfy has recently presented to the Institute Library a work on the Temples of Japan that will give pleasure to all who have felt the appeal of that country’s art. The three large volumes, in which the subject is illustrated, were produced in 1910 in view of the then forthcoming Anglo-Japanese Exhibition in London …

p. 22 The exhibition of Contemporary British Architecture which was postponed from 1 November will be held from Friday 1 December to 22 December 1922.

pp. 65-66 Contemporary British Architecture by the President (Mr. Paul Waterhouse, M.A.) This article was contributed by Mr. Waterhouse as a foreword to the Catalogue of the Exhibition of Contemporary British Architecture.

p. 211 Self-expression in Art by C.F.A. Voysey

p. 231 5 March 1923 – As Fellows – Wornum: George Grey [A. 1921] Blue Ball Yard, 64 St. James’s Street, S.W.1. Proposed by Arthur Keen, John W. Simpson, Maxwell Ayrton.

pp. 284-286 The First Exhibition of the Architecture Club by Stanley C. Ramsey … To pass to another group, we have next to consider the work of a number of men, which, for want of a better word – and I use it in no derogatory sense – I will call the “Experimentalists.” Working on traditional lines, they yet strive to infuse their work with a note of distinctive modernity, something which shall make it peculiarly the product of the twentieth century as distinct from all other centuries. Chief amongst these may be reckoned Sir John Burnet, who represents the meeting of such divergent streams as those of the modern Glasgow School and that of the French Beaux Arts … In the group may also be reckoned such men as Mr. Robert Atkinson … Mr. Goodhart-Rendel … Mr. F.W. Troup, Messrs. Percy Adam and Charles Holden, Mr. Dunbar Smith and the late Mr. Cecil Brewer, and possibly Mr. Philip Tiden …

p. 348 Review William Morris – and After. Modern Decorative Art in England ; Its Development and Characteristics. By W.G. Paulson Townsend. Vol. 1. Woven and Painted Fabrics, Wall Papers, Lace and Embroidery. [London : B.T. Batsford, Ltd. 25s.] … The work of the leading masters of decoration, and the outstanding tendencies in modern design, are well illustrated in Mr. Townsend’s book. Modern fabrics, for instance, show the use of strong and vivid colour, naturalistic flowers, contrasted stripes, the free introduction of bird forms, more than an inclination towards chinoiserie – as well as the use of geometric shapes. Many of us have, doubtless, noticed these points, though possibly we have not attached adequate importance to them …

p. 403 Students R.I.B.A. The following candidates, having passed satisfactorily through the architectural courses at the “recognised” schools indicated against their names, have been registered as “Students R.I.B.A.” Fry: Edwin Maxwell (Liverpool University), 1 Cavendish Gardens, Princes Park, Liverpool.

R.I.B.A. Journal Volume 31 : November 1923 – October 1924 p. 227 Business Meeting, 3 March 1924 An election of members will take place at the Business General Meeting, March. The names and addresses of the candidates (with the names of their proposers), found by the Council to be eligible and qualified for membership according to the Charter and Bye-laws and recommended by them for election, are as follows:- Fry: Edwin Maxwell, B. Arch. Liverpool [passed five years’ course at Liverpool University School of Architecture – exempted from Final Examination after passing Examination in Professional practice], 5 Cambridge Street, Hyde Park, W.2. Proposed by Professor C.H. Reilly and the Council.

pp. 254-255 The Emergence of a New Style by Sydney D. Kitson, M.A. [F.]. A remarkable series of articles on modern architecture has recently appeared in the Weekly Westminster. Professor C.H. Reilly’s rollicking style and occasional touches of deliberate and delightful naughtiness remind one of the Irish novels of Charles Lever and make these articles exceedingly good reading … In his final article on “the emergence of a new style,” Professor Reilly writes with a directness of vision and a force of sincerity which challenge attention … The style’s leading feature, however – called “starkness” by Professor Reilly and “nakedness” by the intelligent layman – demands a high standard of skill and scholarship in its execution and an utter absence of affection …

pp. 267-274 The Modern Movement in Architecture by A.E. Richardson, Professor of Architecture in the University of London. Read at Manchester University before the Manchester Society of Architects on 27 February. … Building, which a century since was the special province of the Architect or the Architect-Engineer, is, in these days, regarding as a sort of Tom Tiddler’s ground, free to all and sundry … It is now understood that architecture is an intellectual and a spiritual accomplishment, as well as being scientific and functional. The public, while demanding fitness of purpose, also look for a high efficiency of artistic attainment, and realise that expressive forms are wanted in place of caricatures of past styles … Commonsense points to the re-establishment of basic principles – that is to say, a return to the primary theory that use and function determine structure, and that good structure will give originality of form … The present thought – it is not Bolshevik – aims not so much at creating a new order of designing and fashioning, but a return to the structural principles of building, which alone can be used to express modern conditions. To my way of thinking, it is hopeless to be original by referring to past originality …

p. 287 Maxwell Fry elected as Associate.

pp. 298-302 A Note on Concrete Buildings

pp. 303-304 Some Fundamental Ideas in Relation to Art – by C. F. A. Voysey

p. 359 On the Library Table Japan – The journal of the Institute of Japanese Architects (Kerrchiku[sic.] Zasshi) has many views of the destruction caused by the earth-quake. The text is unfortunately only in Japanese.

pp. 409-422 Modern Dutch Architecture by Dr. D. F. Slothouwer Read before the R.I.B.A. Monday 14 April 1924. p. 421 Discussion – Mr. F.R. Yerbury [Secretary, Architectural Association]: In Bedford Square we regard Dr. Slothouwer as one of the representatives of the Centre Party of the Architectural profession in Holland, he is neither Bolshevik nor reactionary.

pp. 468-469 Exhibition of Swedish Architecture by G.G. Wornum [F.] The Exhibition of Modern Swedish Architecture arranged by the Architectural Association in the Institute Galleries was opened by His Excellency Baron Palmstierna, the Swedish Minister in London, on 12 May.

p. 625 The British Pavilion – Paris Exhibition 1925

R.I.B.A. Journal Volume 32 : November 1924 – October 1925 pp. 20-21 Reviews Exposition Internationale de l’Art Architectural a Bruxelles, Septembre, 1922. Bruxelles : Vromant & Co. 1923. The exhibition of architectural designs which is reviewed does not appear to have been supported by British enterprise. France, America, Italy and Japan are represented. C.J. Tait [F.]

p. 21 The Library Ornament. Two thousand motifs in colour, forming a survey of the applied arts of all ages and all countries. With an introduction and catalogue by H. Th. Bossert Fo. Lond. (1924). £9 9s. (Ernest Benn, Ltd). This volume treats of colour decoration and covers a wide field of research. It is fully and well illustrated with examples of pattern and other designs drawn from European sources, the Near and the Far East, Africa, America, New Zealand and other localities. The suggestions it contains should be a useful supplement to the volumes already in the Library that are concerned with the same subject. H.C.C.

p. 78 Review A History of Architecture on the Comparative Method for Students, Craftsmen and Amateurs. By Sir Banister Fletcher. 7th edition. B.T. Batsford, Ltd., 1924. The new edition of this work can be regarded as an authoritative compendium dealing with the history of building from the earliest times to the present day … The now historical styles of India, China, and Japan alone seem to have been outside his ken, but, nothing daunted, he has written about them and spared no effort to add representative illustrations of these essentially Far Eastern types. A.E. Richardson [F.]

pp. 102-103 Reviews Good Manners in Architecture. Good and Bad Manners in Architecture. By A. Trystan Edwards. [London: Philip Allen & Co.] Mr. Edwards has chosen an attractive title, and he has developed his idea so delightfully that architects owe him a debt of gratitude. When our clients want to assert their British independence by demanding buildings entirely out of keeping with their surroundings, all we need do in future is to lend them a copy of “Good Manners in Architecture” to convince them that monotony is not the only, nor even the greatest danger to be avoided … A.H. Moberly [F.] Cubist Architecture. Erich Mendelsohn, Structures and Sketches. Translated from the German by Herman George Scheffoner. Ernest Benn, Limited, London, E.C. Published in London, but printed in Berlin. Fortunately, except for a few descriptive marginal notes to the plates, there are but two pages of intensive letter-press – of unpleasant foreign type … For strange, eerie, and uncanny as they appear [uncomfortable also, we cannot but think, must be the opinion of those whose lot it is to use the cubist chairs and tables portrayed in the interior views: one involuntarily expects to see cubist books on the table; but they are apparently quite normal harmless volumes] and they bear evidence of something of definite achievement and rather wonderful achievement at that. Frank Lishman [F].

pp. 121-139 Shop-fronts and their Treatment by A.J. Davis [F.] Read before the R.I.B.A. on Monday, 15 December 1924.

pp. 273-280 Modern Architecture of the North by Howard Robertson, S.A.D.G., F.S.Arc. Paper read before the Architectural Association of Ireland, 17 February. There are unmistakable signs at the present moment of a movement in England towards an architecture which is a direct expression of a modern outlook and a solution, as far as may be possible, of modern problems … architects like Charles Voysey and C. R. Mackintosh are considered abroad as originators to a degree which is not perhaps felt in England … To sum up, I would say that the lesson of the North for us lies in the fresh impetus to the power of design and a cultivation of invention and resource … The spirit and conditions of to-day are not those of Greece and Rome in the Middle Ages, and we must develop our art accordingly.

pp. 281-283 Modern Architectural Colour by L. H. Bucknell Read before the Liverpool Architectural Society – published 7 March. … I hope you will not ask me to define ‘modern’, but I will say at once that I do not mean ‘jazz.’ This distressing word has already led to much confusion and should be quietly buried …

pp. 329-340 The Architecture of Concrete by Professor Bereford Pite, Hon. M.A. Cantab. [F.] Read before the Royal Institute of British Architects on Monday 30 March 1925.

pp. 345-346 Reviews Some Manchester Streets and their Buildings by Prof. C. H. Reilly. Some Architectural Problems of To-day by Prof. C. H. Reilly. Both published by the University Press of Liverpool Ltd. and Hodder and Stoughton Ltd. London. Reviewed by A. Trystan Edwards.

pp. 390-391 The Principles of Architectural Composition by Howard Robertson. Reviewed by Professor A. E. Richardson [F.] Mr. Howard Robertson as a practising architect is in a more advantageous position, for he takes the line that composition in architecture is susceptible of analysis in his viewpoint, while essentially, modern, is international in its breadth. He has been influenced by his studies in Paris as well as by the opinions of such writers as Mr. Trystan Edwards and has referred to many other authorities.

R.I.B.A. Journal Volume 33 : November 1925 – October 1926 p. 25 Election of Members 30 November 1925. As Fellows: Abercrombie: Professor Leslie Patrick, M.A. Liverpool [A. 1915] Department of Civic Design, School of Architecture, University of Liverpool: 18 Village Road, Oxton, Birkenhead. Proposed by Arnold Thornely, E. Bertram Kirby, Maurice E. Webb.

p. 52 Reviews Het Moderne Landhuis im Nederland by K. Sluyterman and A. J. Van der Steur. 1922. The Hague: M. Nighoff. This book comprises plans and photographs of over 200 modern houses in Holland … The book is witness to a vigorous and lively movement in building, the faults of which may be due to an unchecked exuberance of spirit which will correct itself in time. Walter H. Godfrey.

pp. 67-71 Modern Tendencies in French Architecture by H. P. Cart De Lafontaine, O.B.E. [A.] [no mention of Le Corbusier]

p. 82 Library Notes Vers une Architecture. Le Corbusier. 8vo. Paris, 1924. This, with its later companion volume, l’Art Decoratif d’aujourd’hui, by Le Corbusier, is a brilliant and compelling challenge to the architect of to-day. H.C.H.

p. 90 Elected Fellow Abercombie: Professor Leslie Patrick, M.A. Liverpool [A: 1915]

pp. 270-286 Paris Exhibition of Decorative Art by – Lieut. Colonel H.W.G. Cole, C.S.I., O.B.E. Read before the R.I.B.A. on Monday 1 March. … At the other end you have school of virulent modernity, striving to take opportunity from the unhealthy reactions of the age to satisfy an unhealthy appetite for hideous and unnatural forms …

pp. 287-288 Reviews Dutch Architecture of the Twentieth Century. Edited by J. P. Mieras, Director Bond of Netherland Architects, and F. R. Yerbury, Hon. A.R.I.B.A. London: Ernest Benn, Ltd., 1926. … This introduction is very ably written, and one recognises in a survey of the last fifty years tendencies very similar to those which characterise our own changes of outlook. He [Mieras] sketches the decay of interest taken in the influence of Dr. Cuypers, whom he compares to Voillet-le-Duc, valuable as that influence was, and the emergence of Berlage, the architect of the New Exchange, Amsterdam. Here we are reminded of Burges and Godwin, who broke through the formalities of their Gothic predecessors, while Norman Shaw frankly revolted. C. J. Tait [F.]

p. 452 The Library Notes by members of the Literature Committee on Recent Acquisitions Hamburger Staasbauten by Fritz Schumacher Vol.2. 4˚. Berlin 1921. Book on modern German architecture: ‘ examples chosen with quite exceptional discrimination and taste’. B.O.

p. 582 R.I.B.A. Probationers. Since August, 1925, the following have been registered as Probationers of the R.I.B.A.: Yorke: Francis Reginald Stevens Llwynan, Ivor Road, Redditch.

pp. 587-596 Post-War Architecture in Germany by Dr. Hermann Muthesius … The new generation is captivated by the problem of a so-called new architecture. They hold that the whole of existing architecture is wrong and that an entirely new architecture must be created … Inspiration for the new architecture is also derived from the works of the American artist, Frank Lloyd Wright. … the representatives of cubic constructions … deceive themselves into believing that their creations are purely constructive and economic and that they have nothing to do with art. They claim to build usefully at the same time they sin largely against usefulness and construction. The reason is that their minds are entirely possessed by the suggestion of cubic form. … even the biggest output of literature does not bring about new art … It is fortunate, however, that the majority of architects now active in Germany work on normal, progressive lines and have nothing to do with the extravagant fancies of the “Modern Architects.”

p. 616 Reviews Books Illustrating the Exhibition of Decorative Arts, Paris, 1925. There is a striking diversity of opinion as to the merit of the buildings and exhibits that composed the Paris Exhibition of 1925, but its importance as a symptom can scarcely be questioned. The extent of the interest aroused is proved by the number of works on the subject issued by publishing firms in France* and elsewhere, and of these the R.I.B.A. Library now possesses a full representative selection … John Murray Easton [A.] *French Books: Exposition des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, 1925. 1. Bâtiments et Jardins. M. Roux. Edition : Albert Lévy, Paris, 1925. 2. L’Architecture Officielle et les Pavillons. P. Patout. Edition : Ch. Moreau. Paris. 3. Ensembles Mobiliers, 2me and 3me Séries : Maurice Dufrene. Edition : Ch. Moreau. Paris. 4. Intérieurs en Couleurs. Preface par Léon Deshairs. Edition : Albert Levy. Paris. 5. Devantures, Vitrines, Installations de Magasins à l’Exposition. René Herbst. Edition : Ch. Moreau. Paris. 6. La Ferronerie Moderne. H. Clouzot. Edition : Ch. Moureau. Paris. 7. La Sculpture Décorative Moderne, Ièr Série. H. Rapin. Edition : Ch. Moreau. Paris.

p. 616 Correspondence Broadcast Criticism – letter from James Ransome [F.] Sir, - After listening to Professor Reilly’s condemnation of the new Regent Street “broadcasted” last week, I suggested to the B.B.C. that, in justice to those responsible for the new buildings, some defence of this achievement should receive equal publicity …

R.I.B.A. Journal Volume 34 : November 1926 – October 1927 pp. 138-141 Council for the Preservation of Rural England – Inaugural meeting 18 December 1926 [This council was formed at the RIBA]

pp. 235-240 Address to Students by Professor J. Hubert Worthington. Read before the R.I.B.A. on Monday 31 January. p. 238 … “Modernism” is a word that many of us consider synonymous with Bolshevism, but we must face this controversial topic that divides the art world into such disastrous factions … But there is something there. It cannot be suppressed, nor should we wish to suppress it. If it is vital and progressive we should rather try and guide it into safe channels. It should be guided, not stifled …

p. 247 Reviews – 5 February 1927 Laymen and the New Architecture by Fredk. R. Horns [F.] Laymen and the New Architecture. By Manning Robertson, A.R.I.B.A., F.R.A.S. John Murray. … Though it may be true that possession of natural taste by children is a delusion, it might, surely, also be said that the present-day general lack of right judgment in what is called the aesthetics of building, is mainly due to the dreadful examples of modern work with which most of us are surrounded, and that causes both small and grown up children quite naturally but mistakenly to regard Frascati’s Restaurant as “ripping” …

p. 248 Reviews – 5 February 1927 Architectural Style. By Trystan Edwards. London: Faber and Gwyer, Ltd. Mr Trystan Edwards, occupies a unique position in the architectural world. There are very few writers of architecture of any consideration, who have not sooner or later quoted from Mr. Edwards’ writings, though sometimes the acknowledgement with which it is usual to accompany such borrowings, has not been forthcoming … I imagine there are, perhaps, not a few who cannot read his books, save with a certain feeling of exasperation, earnest souls to whom such a book as Good and Bad Manners in Architecture must seem like the fantastic mutterings of a Master of Deportment … In his book Architectural Style, he has given us something which might be called a “Grammar of Design,” or a “Grammar of Architecture” … So with a grammar of architecture, the language must come first and must find a common acceptance before there can be any agreement as to the grammar – Stanley C. Ramsey [F.]

pp. 323-337 Modern French Architecture by Howard Robertson. Read before the R.I.B.A. on Monday 14 March The title of my paper at once brings me face to face with the unfortunate word ‘modern.’ Some people are thrilled by the very sound of this word, but to others it only suggests a term of opprobrium. … Le Corbusier … Externally we have a clean simplicity. It would be unfair to criticise this architecture as mannered, for, on the contrary, it is a sincere and earnest expression. Internally we see the effort to obtain effects of space and vista, and a process of elimination of detail which obviously calls for readjustment of our values and ideas as to what should constitute the atmosphere of home … Discussion – Mr. H.S. Goodhart-Rendel: … Some modern French houses are the most perfect modern houses of any I have seen. In those things the French are, as they always have been, supreme. It would be deplored that Corbusier is taken as representative of a very characteristic French tendency. Mr. H.M. Fletcher: … But when you come to Corbusier, he did not support anything upon anything. A 2-in. window-frame was considered good enough to carry miles of wall, and I do not think that is anything but an experiment from which other people may learn what to avoid. In general, it goes to show that if we consider the laws of architecture and abide by them, we shall not go wrong. Mr. Howard Robertson (in reply): … But there are some misconceptions in regard to our good friend Corbusier. He is, in many senses, more logical than he appears. True, he has thin piers at the corners of his buildings, but there are reasons for that. One is that he builds on the standard size, and his piers only require to be very small for the weight they have to carry, as they are of reinforced concrete … The function of Corbusier is to stimulate the diehards. He makes people think, and is, therefore, valuable.

p. 342 Correspondence – 19 March 1927 Professor C. H. Reilly’s Wireless Addresses Letter from E. J. Dixon [A.]

p. 373 Correspondence – 2 April 1927 Professor C. H. Reilly’s Wireless Addresses Letter in response from James Ransome [F.] Dear Sir, - The Chairman of the Bucks Society of Architects, in alluding to my letter on this subject has, I think, missed its point which is – that adverse criticism of modern building schemes should not be “broadcasted” unless facilities for equal publicity be accorded to the expression of divergent views.

p. 383 Members’ Column – 2 April 1927 Messrs. Adams, Thompson and Fry … have taken Mr. E. Maxwell Fry, B.ARCH., A.R.I.B.A., into partnership. The firm will in future be designated Adams, Thompson and Fry, and continue to practice at their offices, 121 Victoria Street, Westminster, S.W.1, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York.

pp. 449-451 Exhibition of Modern British Architecture - opened Tuesday 26 April 1927 by Viscount Peel – First Commissioner of Works … One of the difficulties in modern days is that, I suppose: that the tremendous development of science and the application of science to business have rather out-stripped the aesthetic principle … pp. 451-452 The Exhibition by Sir Reginald Blomfield, R.A. … There is a tendency among some of our younger designers, more apparent in the sister arts, it is true, than in architecture, to turn their back on the past, and act as if it had never existed … I am therefore entirely unconvinced by the latest experiments now being made in France to evolve new forms out of reinforced concrete. Most of them are of a gratuitous and appalling hideousness … The new Architecture is like the new Poetry, it is simply negative. This way madness lies, and I commend to the attention of those who think well of it, some of the efforts of modern Spanish architecture at Barcelona and of Soviet Architecture in Russia. Fortunately we have not yet suffered much from it in England, and as long as we are true to ourselves we need not fear its incursion …

p. 489 The Library Decorative Art, 1927: “The Studio” Year Book. Edited by C. Geoffrey Holme and Shirley B. Wainwright. Small fo. London, 1927. [London: The Studio.] … The standard is quite up to past years, possibly rather higher.

p. 631 Reviews - Design in Everyday Life & Things The Year Book of the Design and Industries Association edited by John Gloag. London 1927. Reviewed by S. B. Caulfied [F.] … The Design and Industries Association chose wisely in coming to birth in the year 1921. For more than fifty years before that, William Morris and his disciples, and the various societies and schools that followed them had been preparing the way … To what extent the complications of modern life are essential is a difficult question. We certainly cannot escape altogether. Morris loathed the machine … Artists must learn how to get the best out of a machine before common articles – furniture, knives and forks, teapots that pour out properly – of good design, can come into general use. Here is a rich field for the D.I.A.

R.I.B.A. Journal Volume 35 : November 1927 – October 1928 p. 8 The Inaugural Address by the President, Mr. Walter Tapper A.R.A. Read before the Royal Institute of British Architects on Monday, 7 November 1927. … We can congratulate ourselves that architecture is not liable to the vagaries of the Cubist and the Futurist, at any rate in this country … As I said at the beginning, I repeat, architecture is progressing slowly but steadily; it is better understood today than it was, say, in the fifties, and this may be said generally of the Arts. Take music, it is true we have a great deal of jazz rubbish, but also, there is always an audience for the great classic masters, and if we want this universally, we shall get it in due time, and so it is with our art. There is a great deal of jazz architecture but there is a greater quality of good work than was the case some years ago.

p. 22 Reviews Chinesishe Baukeramik. Von Ernst Boerchmann 40. Berlin, 1927. [Berlin: Albert Lüdtke] A collection of very good photographs and a few colour reproductions of Chinese ceramic work as applied to building, together with an essay and a descriptive list of plates … Those interested in the use of architectural faience and terra cotta will find inspiration in this book. J.M.E.

p. 24 Announcement of Dinner to Mr. C.F. Annesley Voysey.

p. 27 List of Students Elected at Council Meeting, 24 October 1927. McGrath: Raymond, Clare College, Cambridge (Special Exemption).

pp. 52-53 Dinner to C.F. Annesley Voysey

p. 77 Reviews Architecture Simplified. By Martin S. Briggs [F.] Architecture. By A. L. N. Russell, A.R.I.B.A. (The Simple Guide Series. London: Chatto and Windus, 1927) Learned architects are sometimes inclined to disparage attempts to cover the whole field of architectural history and theory in a single slender volume, forgetting how much they owe to the way in which their art is presented to the Great Unwashed … In many country backwaters there is still an idea that the only architecture worth attention is that of the Middle Ages, and that modern buildings and movements are things that no decent person mentions in respectable company … It is, therefore, with real pleasure that one finds a modern practising architect entering into the enemy’s country, and writing a book that presents architecture as architects themselves regard it to-day … his style of writing, though it is calculated to shock the pedant here and there, is refreshing in its easy idiom. For example, he … compares the terrible complexity of Greek optical refinements to “the Mikado’s nightmare billiards” (p.31). On p. 114 he describes late Gothic foliage as “mere shapeless cabbagery,” …

p. 83 Students elected at Council Meeting on Monday 5 December 1927: Yorke: Francis Reginald Stevens, Llwynon, Redditch, Worcs. (Birmingham School of Architecture).

p. 162 RIBA Probationers During the period 1 July to 30 November 1927, the following have been registered as Probationers of the Royal Institute:- McGrath: Raymond, Clare College, Cambridge. pp. 180-184 Chinese Architecture by Arnold Silcock. 28 January 1928 It is extraordinary that the literature of all branches of Japanese art is much more comprehensive than that on Chinese, especially when one considers that the whole culture of Japan is merely an outgrowth of the earlier Chinese civilisation. In most of the arts the Japanese have been thorough plagiarists, and it is therefore all the more remarkable that the tributary has received so much attention while the parent stream has remained comparatively unexplored. This is especially true of architecture, for the construction and decoration of Japanese structures owe everything to Chinese inspiration and influence …

p. 226 Review – Recent Foreign Periodicals. By Grahame B. Tubbs [A.] That New York is merely a convenient stopping-place for the European architect on his way to see Chicago and the Middle West, is the contention of Mr. Lewis Mumford in an article called “New York v. Chicago in Architecture” in the American magazine Architecture for November … He maintains that it is these Americans [Burham & Root and Adler & Sullivan] who have inspired Modernist architectural designers, such as Mendelsohn in Germany, Oud in Holland, and Le Corbusier and Mallet-Stevens in France. This contention would not be admitted for a moment by many whose opinion is of value. A good case could be made out for tracing the latest manifestation of modernism to the Art Nouveau movement of the beginning of the century, or it might be contended that it is a spontaneous movement starting independently in various countries and caused through the application of science to industry and especially to building … Those American architects, such as Frank Lloyd Wright, who have carried on Sullivan’s ideas, have been practically ignored in America, although their influence on the Continent has been considerable …

p. 269 Towards a New Architecture – M. Le Corbusier’s Book by A.S.G. Butler [F.] … there is below the entertaining flutter of its sentences, I think, some confusion of thought. One might call it heresy. It appears that we must have architecture which has the beauty of machines and not the beauty of architecture. We are to have buildings designed with all the hard, polished, snappy obviousness of an aeroplane. But why should we? House do not fly about; most factories do not float …

p. 305 Reviews – Towards a New Architecture by Maurice B. Adams [F.] To better understand what is at the bottom of M. Le Corbusier’s venture after what Sir Edwin Lutyens lately so well described as “the Robotism of Architecture,” … The Robots and “mass-men” who are trying to develop architecture on such up-to-date methods tell us that stone as a building material is completely dead and out of harmony with the age, hindering the development of “The Mistress Art.” …

p. 359-367 Chinese Pagodas by Arnold Silcock [F.] When Kipling wrote “Mandalay” and when Willeby composed the fine musical setting, they captured and conveyed to us the strange charm of an Oriental landscape. Kipling’s pagoda was in Burma, and, in fact, although it is always thought of as a Chinese form, the pagoda is found in the far South and also as far north as Manchuria and Japan …

pp. 435-448 Health and Recreation Centres

p. 460 Chinese Pagodas With regard to his Paper on “Chinese Pagodas,” published in the Journal on 14 April last, Mr. Silcock, replying to a correspondent, writes: “The question your correspondent raises is an interesting one, but, unfortunately, very few measured drawings of pagodas have been published …

p. 493 Correspondence - Chinese Pagodas Letters from Flinders Petrie [Hon. A.] and Maurice B. Adams [F.]

pp. 512-523 Modernism in Architecture A Debate held at the R.I.B.A. on Monday, 21 May 1928 The President, Mr. Walter Tapper, A.R.A., in the chair Mr. Goodhart- Rendel on Le Corbusier: ‘being the essential voice of the modern movement’: I do not think he is that, in any sense. I think he is one of those men who are born old-fashioned. I think he has the worst Victorian ethical view of architecture, and he only manages to be heard because he talks a great deal and is very noisy … Mr. H.W. Chester: This term ‘Modernist’ is unfortunate. It has come to be applied to the architecture which Corbusier has boomed so much in his books. He may be a fine writer, but I do not think he can be considered as a good architect. I favour the so-called ‘Modernist school,’ but I would not like to say that Corbusier’s works are typical of the new architecture … Hon. H.A. Pakington: … the best Modernists do look back, to find out what it was that other men discovered. Corbusier, I believe, has his office full of beautiful antique furniture. Mr. R.A. Duncan: … I believe Modernism to be a different method of looking at the Universe, enquiring into it, and discovering its inspiration, its systems of law and order; it is this which is disturbing the old empirical methods of art, of politics, of economics, of religion, and of industry. Mr. Howard Robertson: … The essence of the Modern view is that it has nothing to do with the concrete house or Corbusier; it has to do with the attitude of mind towards the architectural problem. The Modernist is the man who is inclined to apply the brain once more, after it has been stagnant for a hundred years, to a fresh view of problems which are fresh today … Professor Lethaby was unable to attend but contributed to the debate by letter: … I should like to have had the chance of making the remark that there are two quite opposed things which go by the name of “Modernism in Architecture.” One, reasonable building, and the other just another form of “crank” cubism, and jazzery jump. Many people appear to be agog about this latter as something they may call “style” and imitate from the Continent. The first variety of “Modernism” we shall surely have to attempt some time within, say, 20 or 200 years, but I am afraid we shall put it off until we can think of that too as a “style” we may copy. Of course, it is properly an experimental way like the steamship and aeroplane styles.

p. 532 Correspondence – Chinese Pagodas Letter from Arnold Silcock replying to Messrs. Petrie & Adams.

pp. 561-567 Ideals and Methods in Schools of Architecture – First series 1. School of Architecture, University of Liverpool By Professor C.H. Reilly, M.A. (Cantab.)., [F.] p. 567 Correspondence – Chinese Pagodas Letter from J. Standen Adkins referring to Dr. Christopher Dresser and Mr. Conder. Sir, - On 5 December 1884 Dr. Christopher Dresser read a paper before the A.A. on “Japanese Architecture” … Three years later Mr. Conder read a paper at the R.I.B.A. on the “Domestic and Civil Architecture of Japan,” …

pp. 611-612 Correspondence – Chinese Pagodas Response from Arnold Silcock Sir, - Mr. Standen Adkins quotes Mr. Conder as saying Dr. Dresser’s statement, that the centre posts of Japanese pagodas were hung pendulum fashion with the idea of reducing the effect of earthquake shocks was absolutely unwarranted … Further comment from Maurice B. Adams Sir, - I am glad Mr. J. Standen Adkins has been good enough to confirm my memory as to Dr. Christopher Dresser’s lecture before the A.A. on 5 December 1885[?] … It does not appear that the paper read before the R.I.B.A. in 1886 (reported in Vol. III, New Series, of The Transactions, by Mr. Josiah Conder on The Domestic Architecture of Japan, includes any reference to pagoda construction, and makes no mention of the idea of Dr. Dresser …

pp. 648-650 Is Architecture still the Mother of the Arts? Debate held at the Victoria and Albert Museum on 26 July under the auspices of the Board of Education. The debate was one of a series of lectures designed as a short course for teachers in art schools. The following contribution to the debate has been received from Mr. C.F.A. Voysey: The architectural mother of to-day, like the human modern mother, favours small families … But the modern architect too often contents himself with the bastard children of the mass-producing machine. And so, much so-called modern architecture is not architecture at all, but merely commercial building, therefore the children of so corrupt a mother can never exhibit the aristocratic qualities that architects fostered before they flirted with foreign styles … My answer to the question, then, is yes! Architecture is still the mother of the arts, but her children are, generally speaking, illegitimate.

p. 719 Cambridge student’s work – drawing of an Airport – modernistic.

R.I.B.A. Journal Volume 36 : November 1928 – October 1929 p. 24 Arts and Crafts Exhibition at Burlington House. By Fredk. R. Hiorns [F.]

pp. 25-26 Reviews – Notes on Recent Foreign Periodicals by Grahame B. Tubbs Mr. Frank Lloyd Wright continues his brilliant series of papers – “In the Cause of Architecture” – in the Architectural Record for October … In the building that he has imagined, all the weight is borne by internal concrete columns, from which the floors are cantilevered, the external walls being mere screens … It may be recalled that it was assumed that this principle of construction was used for the “House of the Future” at the Ideal Homes Exhibition this year. In the October number of Architecture, the third part of Mr. Lewis Mumford’s penetrating analysis of “American Architecture To-day” is printed, and shows still further evidence that the seeds of modernism are beginning to germinate in the United States, as well as in Europe. The American Architect for the same month prints some replies to a questionnaire sent to eminent architects, as to what they consider the ten finest American buildings … The editor prints a long letter from an artist (who shows signs of “breaking out” into modernism) who asks in vigorous language how many of the buildings included in any of the lists are truly American and not mere foreign styles “warmed up”. p. 32 Publications Received Gardens and Design by J. C. Shepherd and G. A. Jellicoe. 40. Lond. 1927 [Benn.]

p. 41 Election of Members – 3 December 1928 As Associates – McGrath: Raymond [Special Exemption], Clare College, Cambridge. Proposed by Major Hubert C. Corlette, E. Stanley Hall and Theodore Fyfe.

p. 54-62 The Organisation and Equipment of American Buildings – Part I. By Doris Adeney Lewis [A.] Winner of the RIBA (Alfred Bossom) Studentship, 1926. p. 56 … A further development of the large unit principle has been made in many of the plans of Frank Lloyd Wright, in which a single large apartment is sub-divided by screens, bookcases, or fitted furniture into various sub-divisions of dining room, study, recess, etc. The result is great spaciousness of effect in a comparatively limited area, and the production of interesting perspectives; similar methods of planning are at present being attempted on the Continent, notably in the domestic work of the French modern school.

p. 68 Reviews Examples of Modern French Architecture. Edited by Howard Robertson and F. R. Yerbury. … The general impression left is that in its handling of concrete this ultra-modern French architecture is dehumanised. Concrete is a plastic material and can be easily relieved, so why not relieve it? … The Corbusier houses seem to go unnecessarily out of their way to resemble the bridge decks of steamers where they do not resemble cardboard boxes … D. Theodore Fyfe [F.]

p. 113 The Arts and Crafts Exhibition of 1928 by C. F. A. Voysey … The Barnsley brothers have set an example that has been very happily and skilfully taken up and carried on by Ambrose Heal, Gordon Russell, and others.

p. 131 Election of McGrath: Raymond [Special Exemption] Cambridge.

pp. 135-149 The Development of the Stûpa. By A. H. Longhurst. Archaeological survey of India. p. 137 The toranas were introduced into Korea, China and Japan along with the Buddhist architecture from India about 600 A.D. … p. 138 Thus we have the primary idea of the accumulated honour of the pyramid of stone or metal discs, which subsequently became such a prominent feature of Buddhist architecture, culminating in the many-storeyed pagodas of China and Japan. p. 148-149 Metal chhattrâvalîs of this kind no longer exist in India, although they seem to have been common enough in the seventh century when Hiuen Tsiang visited the country, but a few good specimens may still be seen adorning the many-roofed wooden pagodas of China and Japan. p. 179-190 Modern Glass - Basil Ionides – 12 January 1929 p. 186 I have had a panel done for a room at the Savoy Hotel on which a figure is shown in Japanese dress. The different robes are done in different tones or degrees of acid, and gilded in different golds touched in places with scarlet. The background is of gold leaf behind clear glass in staggered squares. There is a similar panel in silver in the next room. p. 211 The Contribution of Charles Rennie Mackintosh an obituary by Howard Robertson With the passing of Charles Rennie Mackintosh the architectural profession loses a pioneer whose work is probably better known and appreciated abroad than in England; for Mackintosh was in every sense a prophet in deeds if not in words. His designs for the Glasgow School of Art, the Glasgow Tea-rooms, the Herald office, and houses in Chelsea, are amongst his best known works. Their interest, to-day, lies not only in the individuality of the designs, but also in the extent to which they are prophetic of much that is happening in the advanced modern movement, more particularly on the Continent. The Glasgow School of Art contains in its external treatment, and in many characteristics of its interior detail, the germ of themes to-day familiar through the work of men like Hoffmann, Behrens, Gropius, or Le Corbusier …

p. 324 Reviews Modern European Buildings. By F. R. Yerbury. Lond. [Victor Gollancz, Ltd.] … One feels also that the bulk of the work is serious, and worthy to rank with that of any past age, in spite of much that is frankly experimental. Some of it reflects passing fads and fashions; but that is healthy. Fashions are not to be condemned; in architecture they are like the foam and froth of a great wave, which breaks and forms again in its progress towards an ever distant shore. Howard Robertson [F.]

pp. 443-447 Allied Societies – 13 April 1929 West Yorkshire Society of Architects at Leeds on 21 March lecture on “Modern Design and Decoration” by Mr. Howard Robertson [A.] … The Orient, particularly Japan, has been a source of inspiration to the modernist. Flat tones, plain surfaces, colour combinations of red and black, yellow and green, the use of lacquers are typical of Japanese art, and very popular today. And rhythm, which is fundamental in the decoration of the Orient, is a basic factor in present-day design. The modern movement has come to stay, because it is real and vital; and the twentieth century will be one of the great periods of a living art. pp. 520-526 International Exhibition of Modern Commercial Architecture

p. 557 Reviews – Notes on some recent foreign periodicals by Grahame B. Tubbs [A.] The half-yearly volume of L’Architecture Vivante, the Bible of the Advance Guard of Architecture, has just arrived from Paris. M. le Corbusier writes on the application of mathematical ratios to architectural design, so continuing the interest in a subject that has fascinated many artists since the time of Leonardo … These designs are difficult to criticise, as all the customary criteria of beauty and convenience seem to have been ignored. It would appear that M. le Corbusier’s theories are more convincing in the abstract than when carried out in concrete.

pp. 779-783 Architecture as Sculpture Notes of a lecture delivered to the Liverpool Architectural Society on 21 November 1928. By Eric Gill.

pp. 783-784 The Same Subject from an Architect’s Point of View. By A. Trystan Edwards [A.]

pp. 793-794 The Spread of Ugliness by the Dean of Manchester

R.I.B.A. Journal Volume 37 : November 1929 – October 1930 p. 65 Allied Societies – 23 November 1929 Essex, Cambridge and Herts Society of Architects – Southend and District Chapter. A lecture on “Domestic Architecture” was given by Mr. H. Baillie-Scott, F.R.I.B.A. at the School of Arts and Crafts on Wednesday 6 November. … It was an age of machinery. They designed their motor cars on lines of strict utility and efficiency. Why not do the same with houses and cut out all the artistic business, especially as the pursuit of artistic ideals had in the past led them so far astray? Let them be sensible. If they were sensible, they must realise that the problems involved in building a house were something essentially different from those to be considered in making a machine. The modern ideal of the home has been summed up in the phrase “a machine to live in.” It would be almost as reasonable to describe a church as “a machine to pray in” …

p. 106 Allied Societies – 7 December 1929 West Yorkshire Society of Architects Mr. G. H. Foggitt, F.R.I.B.A., delivered his presidential address before a meeting … on 21 November at the Hotel Metropole, Leeds: Modern Tendencies and the Modernist Movement … In this country we have as yet few examples of the work of this school as compared with the Continent. The tendency is perhaps most apparent in the shop fronts which indicate to us that the new spirit is in our midst, whether we admire all its manifestations or not.

pp. 164-165 The R.I.B.A. London Architecture Medal and Diploma 1928 Presentation to J. Murray Easton [F.] and Howard Robertson [F.]

p. 201 Reviews Photographs and Drawings of the Bank of Japan. A Memorial of the Life work of Dr. Kingo Tatsuno. Fo. [Tokyo.] 1929 Among the more important recent presentations to the Library of the Institute is the portfolio of plates illustrating an outstanding work of noted Japanese architect, the late Dr. Kingo Tatsuno.

p. 204 Modern Architecture by Bruno Taut London 1929 The Studio, which has always been keenly alive to the development of the arts abroad, has published a translation of Bruno Taut’s book on Modern Architecture, which originally appeared in Germany. While there are many illustrations, this work does not consist merely of a collection of these strung together, but of an essay in eight chapters, each illustrated by the appropriate subjects. Bruno Taut’s thesis for the new aesthetic is:- “The aim of architecture is the creation of the perfect, and, therefore, also beautiful, efficiency.” p. 311 [correction – book commissioned by The Studio subsequently sold to Germany]

p. 235 Japanese Palace, Dresden, pencil sketch by Sir Reginald Blomfield R.A.

pp. 244-245 Application for membership – Election 7 April 1930 Sano : Dr. Riki, Lecturer of Imperial University, Tokyo President of the Japanese Institute of Architects, Dean of Technical College of Nihon University, Tokyo, 160 Kagamachi, Koishikawa-ku, Tokyo, Japan. pp. 251-263 Himalayan Architecture. By A. H. Longhurst, Superintendent, Archaeological Survey, Southern Circle, India. Fig. 18 – The Monastery of Horinji, Japan. p. 252 The smaller shrines have a plain gable or pent-roof … but the larger and more important buildings have a pyramidal wooden roof some-times rising in several tiers like the pagodas of China and Japan. p. 254 We know that the Buddhist religion and architecture from India reached China and Japan through Korea about 600 A.D. … It must not be forgotten that the form of Indian architecture that found its way into China and Japan was the later style of Buddhist architecture of the seventh century A.D., when for the most part structural temples had replaced the stûpas as the religious edifice. The earliest Buddhist monuments in China and Japan are all in this later style, the so-called wooden “pagodas” being merely temples in the Himalayan style. p. 257 Some of these little stone shrines bear a striking resemblance to the stone memorial lanterns set up in the temple enclosure in Japan … p. 263 The striking resemblance between the temples of Nepal and the earliest wooden pagodas of China and Japan, seem to indicate that it was mainly from Nepal, via Tibet and Korea, that this style of Indian architecture found its way into these remote countries.

p. 270 The Institute of Landscape Architects The Institute has been formed to promote the study and general advancement of the art of landscape architecture and to serve as a medium for friendly intercourse between the members and others practising or interest in the art.

pp. 300-307 Himalayan Architecture – Part II p. 303 Prior to the sixth century A.D., Japan was a comparatively uncivilised country and the religion of the people was a primitive cult of the dead, of which the modern Shinto is a somewhat artificial revival. But in the p. 304 seventh century, at the instigation of Prince Shotoku, Buddhist priests, builders and scholars arrived from Korea. Nara became the capital, and in a few years the Koreans founded the famous monastery of Horiuji, an historical event which marks the birth of Japan as a civilised power … Fig. 19 – Yakushiji Pagoda, Japan. Here too, for the first time, we find the roof struts and double brackets which subsequently became such characteristic features of Japanese architecture.

p. 391 12 April 1930 – Elected as Hon. Corresponding Member: Sano: Dr. Riki, Lecturer of Imperial University, Tokyo. President of The Japanese Institute of Architects, Dean of Technical College of Nihon University, Tokyo.

pp. 434-435 Allied Societies – 26 April 1930 West Yorkshire Society of Architects at the Leeds College of Art on 20 March Mr. Howard Robertson, F.R.I.B.A., Principal of the Architectural Association School of Architecture, London, gave a Lecture on modern architecture in Germany. … In England, architectural design has been so preoccupied with the maintenance of tradition that a truly modern building comes as a shock, and may be out of key with its more or less ‘old world’ surroundings …

p. 515 Review Decorative Art. By Arnold Silcock. The Studio Year Book of Decorative Art, 1930. Sm.fo. London, 1930. Ceramics – Bernard Leach – high standard. The place for these pieces [glass and metal tube furniture] is surely the interior of one of the highly sanitary, whitewashed group of boxes illustrated under the title “New Influences in Architecture” … Some of the houses illustrated have the appearance of a species of box-like guinea-pig house which might have been devised by a megalomaniac millionaire for the housing in sunny, sanitary quarters of his pets.

pp. 546-557 Science and the Art of Architecture An Introduction to the Study of the Causes of the Disturbance of Traditions. By Ronald Aver Duncan [A.] [awarded the R.I.B.A. Silver Medal, 1930] p. 555 Chapter IV – Architecture the Social Art. The art of China and Japan while making a less insistent demand for permanent materials, has suffered no loss of virtue in consequence.* *By comparison with European building methods and materials those of China and Japan are, for the most part, of a much more temporary nature. Particularly, is this the case in house construction, but even in temple building, wood and lacquer predominate as materials for the super structure.

p. 557-558 The Stockholm Exhibition 1930. By Ll. E. Williams [A.] … Many of the exhibition buildings seem to have been designed on the doctrines laid down by Le Corbusier. The Motto of the promoters of the Swedish Arts, Crafts, and Industries Exhibition, which opens this month at Stockholm is “An Ideal Home for Everyone”, and large sections will be devoted to architecture and interior design.

p. 559 Reviews The City of To-morrow. By H. W. Chester [A.] The City of To-morrow and Its Planning. By Le Corbusier. Translated from the 8th French Edition of Urbanisme by Frederic Etchells. London 1929. This book is well produced and should prove of great interest both to the architect and general reader.

p. 562-563 Notes on some recent foreign periodicals – 7 June 1930 … Evidence that such thought is spreading is seen in the special number of the Revista di Arquitectura of Buenos Aires which is given up to modernistic work. The letter-press of this number is largely taken up by a translation of the discussion at the Architectural Association, London, which was initiated by Mr. R. A. Duncan’s Paper on “Modern Tendencies in Architecture” … This month the German town planning magazine Stâdtebau has been amalgamated with Wasmuths Monatshefte für Baukunst … The February number gives examples of the smallest type of house from various countries and prints an article on le Corbusier. This issue also has photographs of a series of houses at Hollywood by Frank Lloyd Wright … Frank Lloyd Wright is also represented in the American Architectural Record for January by a number of coloured drawings for a glass skyscraper …

p. 608 British Architects Conference at Norwich 18-21 June 1930 Inaugural meeting – 19 June 1930 Members were officially welcomed by the Lord Mayor:- … You are most fortunate in meeting under the presidency of one who is world-famous in his profession. His unique gifts have been recognised not only in all parts of Europe, but so far afield as China and Japan, whilst academic honours have been showered upon him. [The President – Sir Banister Fletcher, F.S.A.]

p. 706 Reviews – 20 September 1930 Chinese Architecture. By Arnold Silcock [F.] Bulletin of the Society for the Research in Chinese Architecture. No. 1, July, 1930. Vol. I. This is the title of a new art journal, printed and published in Peking, of which a copy of the first issue has just arrived in England … It is just this type of society and publication which China needs and it is to be hoped that western scholars will be only too pleased to help such young organisations by allowing their work to be reprinted in this way in China.

pp. 731-732 Reviews Modern Sculpture. By Robert Atkinson [F.] Modern Architectural Sculpture. Edited by W. Aumonier. 40. Lond. 1930 [Architectural Press].

R.I.B.A. Journal Volume 38 : November 1930 – October 1931 pp. 3-13 The Inaugural Address – The President, Sir Banister Fletcher 4. Conclusion … Every architect should remember that streets and roadways are our common property, and he should respect their human amenities and not erect a building resembling the Mappin Terraces suitable for tigers at the Zoo, or something so ultra-modern that it quarrels violently with its quiet elderly neighbours.

pp. 63-79 Modern Cinema Design – Mr. J. R. Leathart

p. 91 Christmas Holiday Lectures on Architecture for Boys and Girls by the Hon. Humphrey Pakington entitled “Architecture To-day and To-morrow” I. Why look back? The Sense of Beauty. II. Why be modern? Steel, Concrete and Glass. III. Are we progressing? Flying Houses.

pp. 106-107 Accessions to the Library. October – 15 December 1930 Precisions. By Le Corbusier. … there will be great enjoyment over his dogmatic utterances … Modern Architecture. Hitchcock Modern Theatre and Cinemas. By Morton Shand Art Nonsense, and Other Essays. By Eric Gill pp. 150-151 Reviews - Modern Theatres and Cinemas : The Architecture of Pleasure. By P. Morton Shand – reviewed by Robert Atkinson The present tendency of the public to run after decorators with foreign names is not what we are sacrificing ourselves on the altar of modernism for. It is quite a good thing to follow, appreciate and assimilate whatever is good abroad, but quite a different thing for Mr. Colinsky or Mr. Confusius to practice at Olympia.

pp. 167-172 The R.I.B.A. London Architecture Medal and Diploma 1929 Presentation to Charles Holden and L. G. Pearson Charles Holden: I believe that is the thought underlying the best of what is called “Modernism” to-day. It must be remembered that it was the modernist of the past who was the maker of the traditions which some would have us follow exclusively to-day. p. 223 Reviews - The New Interior Decoration. By Dorothy Todd and Raymond Mortimer – reviewed by E. K. D. Hughes The chapter called “The Influence of Architecture” is a stimulating one – though the authors are apt to accept clever current generalisations of artistic criticism – and they specially support the teachings of Corbusier and his school.

p. 265 Reviews – The Plan Requirements of Modern Buildings. By Verner O. Rees – reviewed by Howard Robertson A further criticism, which, of course, results from considerations of space … Also, the domestic plan contribution of men like Le Corbusier and Lloyd Wright would have made clear the present fluid state of plan theory in this field.

p. 271 Allied Societies – Birmingham Architectural Association 24 January 1931 – an address by Mr. A. Trystan Edwards on the Modernist Movement in Architecture. Mr. Edwards said that he disliked skyscrapers, garden suburbs, twentieth century Tudor, and a good deal of what was known as twentieth century classic, but still more did he dislike the eccentric manifestations of the modernist movement … Mr. Tystan Edwards defined the new functionalism as ‘That unattractive residuum obtained when you deprive a building of its proper components of good manners and good composition.’

p. 333 Reviews – Modern English Furniture. By John C. Rogers – reviewed by Charles Spooner The “operating-theatre” style so much beloved by the school of M. Corbusier, has not been tried yet in England, I believe; I feel sure it will always be repugnant to nearly all of my countrymen.

p. 353 Some Aerodromes in Germany and Holland by John Dower

pp. 370-371 Reviews - Past, Present and Future Men and Buildings. By John Gloag The New World Architecture. By Sheldon Cheney – reviewed by EJC Mr Gloag’s book, we have said, is an excellent comment on The New World Architecture, partly because he is, if anything, unduly intolerant of the modern schools, and has many hard words to say about those whom Mr. Cheney praises most. He represents fairly, however, the attitude of the medium advanced opinion in England …

pp. 435-455 Modern Flats by G. Grey Wornum

pp. 456-458 The Architecture of Modern Transport Opening of Exhibition at the R.I.B.A. by Mr. H.G. Wells The President, Sir Banister Fletcher, F.S.A., in the chair

p. 464 Reviews – Le Corbusier und Pierre Jeannert. Ihr Gesamtes Werk von 1910-1929 – reviewed by E. R. Jarrett Sir Reginald Blomfield in a recent lecture at the Royal Academy on Modernism quoted the gibe thrown at Le Corbusier by Bruno Taut, that, “his merit lay principally in his books.” Comparing the work, both architectural and literary, of Taut and Le Corbusier, this is fairly amusing, but whether the phrase contains a germ of truth or not it must be conceded that Le Corbusier is no mere, unpractical scribbler.

Modern Interiors in Colour. English Ed. of “Farbige Raumkunst” The modern revolt against unnecessary over-elaboration in decoration can lead to strange results.

pp. 480-495 Modern Bridges by Maxwell Ayrton

pp. 502-504 Exhibitions – The Royal Academy 1931 This year’s exhibition of architecture at the Royal Academy leaves an impression of restlessness and uncertainty, and may thus be considered as representative of the state of affairs in English architecture to-day … The designs vary from traditional to experimental, if one may still class the flat-roofed, all-window type in the last category.

The Architecture Club 1931 Exhibition – reviewed by H. Austen Hall … Although many of the subjects show how successful the modern manner can be in capable hands, nevertheless the feeling of disturbance remains …

pp. 509-510 Notes by the Science Standing Committee – Orientation of Buildings Sun Planning by Means of Models. The Dufton-Beckett Heliodon

pp. 650-651 The International Housing and Town Planning Congress, Berlin, 1931 By Edward Unwin, A.R.I.B.A. It is to people brought up in these conditions that the new flats come as deliverance, the balcony which forms a feature of every new apartment, with its ample fresh air and sunlight, meaning as much to them as the open development of the English housing scheme to our own slum dwellers … This house had a reinforced concrete frame and stood on legs, about 12 feet above the ground, with the whole of the space underneath available for garden or other purposes.

p. 671-677 The Karl Marx Hof, Vienna by Donald Brooke

p. 683-684 Reviews - Two books on Modern Cinemas and Halls Salles de Spectacles et de’Auditions. Paris Lightspielhauser, Tonfilmtheater. By Paul Zucker & G. Otto Stindt - reviewed by E. Wamsley Lewis What a German writer says about any phase of our own work, and especially the points which he appreciates, is bound to be of interest. It is inevitable that he, belonging to a nation which puts efficiency first, will be scathing in remarks about work built for owners who seldom realise the value of employing an intellectual architect.

pp. 696-698 W.R. Lethaby – Obituary by F.W. Troup

pp. 716-724 The Modern Volksschule of Hamburg by R. Neville Brown

pp. 726-728 Architectural Taste by Sydney D. Kitson Being extracts from an address given by Mr. Sydney Kitson at Winchester, to the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Architectural Association, in July, when he opened an exhibition of drawings by members. It seems to me that never, since the early days of the Renaissance in Italy, was there a more difficult and a more thrilling time for the young architect … A modern school of thought, which flourishes more abroad than in England, would have us rely only on functionalism [tradition versus modern argument]

p. 728 Architects (Registration) Art, 1931

pp. 730-731 Modern European Housing by R. Minton Taylor

p. 737-738 W. R. Lethaby – Obituary letter from Arthur Keen His book on “Architecture” closes thus: “The modern way of building must be flexible and vigorous, even smart and hard. We must give up designing the broken-down picturesque which is part of the ideal of make-believe. The enemy is not science but vulgarity, a pretence to beauty at second hand.”

p. 756 The Journal To make changes in such a revered and ancient institution, as the R.I.B.A. Journal is a venture not lightly faced … Meanwhile our modernists and our traditionalists can both hope, and both perhaps gain some assurance from the fact that the Journal committee has had the distinguished help from Stanley Morison and Eric Gill.

p. 771 Accessions to the Library. 30 July – 9 October 1931 Impressions of Japanese Architecture and the allied Arts. By R. A. Cram. [new ed.] Lond. 1931 [Harrap.]

pp. 772-773 Architecture : What’s the Use? A popular lecture delivered at the R.I.B.A. on Saturday, 10 October. By Mr. Clough Williams-Ellis, F.R.I.B.A. Lord Riddell (Hon. A.), in the chair. Mr. Clough Williams-Ellis … went on to explain the phrase by the practice of the Design and Industries Association with its touchstone of “fitness for purpose,” which was first applied to small things such as pots and pans, then to the houses that contained them, then to the cities, and last to the countryside. “Ugly, shoddy surroundings produce mean and shoddy living.” From fitness for purpose has arisen the style of architecture called functionalism …

R.I.B.A. Journal Volume 39 : November 1931 – October 1932 p. 11 The Inaugural Address by the President Dr. Raymond Unwin given on Monday 2 November 1931 Vote of thanks given by Rt. Hon. Sir Herbert Samuel Social Awareness You know the saying that “It is more important to raise the souls of people than the roofs of their habitations.” But, after all, if you raise the roofs of their habitations in the sense of giving them more worth dwellings in which to live, and in the sense of giving them more noble cities as their environment, you do help to raise the souls of the people … Dr. Unwin has spoken to us to-night not only of the social aspect of architecture through town planning, but also of the difficulty of maintaining a right balance between tradition and originality …

p. 18 “Fletcher’s History” a review of A History of Architecture of the Comparative Method by Sir Banister Fletcher. Reviewed by W. S. Purchon

p. 19-20 Some Opinions on Furniture and Decoration A popular lecture delivered at the R.I.B.A. on 17 October by Mr. H.S. Goodhart-Rendel, Mr. D.S. MacColl, in the Chair The uncompromising modernist did not have all right on his side. Novelty could not be made by mere effort of will. “Doing what nobody has done before may only be doing what nobody has been fool enough to do before.” Said Mr. Goodhart-Rendel… In a “period” room you must hide the gramophone; from a modern, or rather ultra-modern, room you must expel the family portraits, it is this sort of unaccommodatingness that makes it ‘ultra.’

p. 20 Tendencies In Very Modern Buildings A popular lecture delivered at the R.I.B.A. on 24 October by Mr. A.S.G. Butler, Sir Richard Paget in the Chair Among the dangers of modernism Mr. Butler said that there was a risk of too great severity of treatment, and a lack of suitability to position. We must not forget position in our eagerness to worship purpose.

pp. 41-54 Modern European Architecture by Mr. H.S. Goodhart-Rendel A paper read before the R.I.B.A. on Monday 16 November 1931 The President, Dr. Raymond Unwin, in the Chair … modern European architecture has suffered lately from too much illustration rather than too little. I have also arrived at very few conclusions, and this I regret; an attitude of agnosticism is one of cold comfort in a lecturer …

pp. 64-65 The Arts and Crafts Exhibitions Society at Burlington House Review of Leach Pottery

p. 65 The Uses of an Architect A popular lecture delivered at the R.I.B.A. on 31 October by Mr. H. B. Creswell [author of the Honeywood File]

pp. 81-93 Street Architecture of London by Mr. Howard Robertson. Monday 30.11.31.

p. 100 Correspondence – The Present State of Architecture … Everyone I meet hates modernist architecture and wonders whatever has overtaken the profession that it should want to exchange tradition for such tripe … Ours is an age of spiritual, moral, intellectual, aesthetic and economic confusion. For this reason the architecture of the speculating builder, because it faithfully reflects this confusion, is the only kind of architecture which may finally claim to be the expression of the age in which we live … architecture ought to aim at being prophetic … Arthur J. Plenty P.S. Is our new building to be Traditional or Modernist? If it is to be Modernist we shall be a laughing stock to the next generation.

pp. 152-153 Correspondence – “Modernism” Response from R.G. Wilshere to Arthur Plenty’s letter … Now that I am awakened to this appalling thing that is gnawing into the vitals of our art, I beg Mr. Plenty to guide us further, and to tell us what constitutes a Traditional Building and what is tripe – I mean modernism …

p. 186 Reviews – Two Books on Housing Moderne Nederlandsche Villa’s en Landhuizen by Prof. Ir. J.G. Wattjes, Amsterdam & Modern Housing by J.R.H. McDonald, London While many in England are preaching the overthrow of our tradition and the advent of “modern” ideas from the Continent, it is instructive and amusing to see the very strong English influence on these recent domestic buildings in Holland. Reviewed by E.P.

p. 187 Lectures to Boys and Girls Given by Mr. E.R. Jarrett on 28 and 30 December and 1 January Houses and Homes: Homes of the Ancients, Mediaeval and Renaissance Homes, and Homes of the Moderns. It is notable, but, perhaps, not altogether surprising, that the last lecture which dealt with the modern home seemed to meet with the most approval. Certain Victorian interiors caused some laughter, and remarks upon good and bad planning were thoroughly appreciated …

p. 235-239 The Principles of Modern Architecture An address by Eliel Saarinen to the 46th Convention of the American Institute of Architects My topic will be: The historical and ethical necessity of the contemporary movement in the development of our culture.

p.271 Reviews – The Adventure of Building by P. Graham A review by Dr. Raymond Unwin, President R.I.B.A. … To save our country from disfigurement, nothing is more necessary than to secure a better understanding on the part of the public of what it is that the architect can do for his comfort by good planning, and for his satisfaction and pleasure by good design …

p.273 Reviews – Frank Lloyd Wright Modern Architecture. Being the Kahn Lectures for 1930 by FLW Two Lectures on Architecture by FLW - reviewed by Trystan Edwards All the world loves a dogmatic writer, and for this reason Lloyd Wright’s book is certain to find appreciative readers…

pp. 293-313 W.R. Lethaby – An Impression and a Tribute by Sir Reginald Blomfield on Monday 5 February 1932 Vote of thanks proposed by Miss May Morris [William Morris’s daughter] Mr. Henry Fletcher: … In architecture or building design his teaching has surely been in large measure responsible for the saner side of what is vaguely called the modern movement …

pp. 314-317 The Drawings of W.R. Lethaby A review of the drawings exhibited at the R.I.B.A. by Noel Rooke … His knowledge of Greek, Roman, Gothic and modern architecture and modern craftsmanship was immense, sound and illuminated by his own living criticism …

pp. 325-326 Correspondence – Modernism Response from Arthur Plenty to R. G. Wilshere … It appears to me that modernist architects went wrong when they began to idealise concrete … Modernism in architecture is a comparatively new thing. But modernism in general is a very old thing; only it was not called modernism, but heresy …

p. 336 The following poem appeared on 17 February in The Times and we print it with permission: BALLADE OF DEVASTATION They’re breaking down the bridge at Waterloo; They’ve daubed the house of Henry James at Rye; They’ve caught a man and put him in the Zoo; They’ve let the Japanese into Shanghai; …

pp. 373-378 The Royal Gold Medal Presentation to Dr. Henrik Petnus Berlage on Monday 7 March 1932 p. 378 Sir Reginald Blomfield: … I feel that Dr. Berlage, from his modernist point of view, is doing all he can to advance architecture, just as we are from ours, old-fashioned traditionalist or stick-in-the-muds, as some may think us.

pp. 417-430 A Layman’s Thoughts on Architecture by Professor J. W. Mackail Monday 2 March 1932

pp. 431-436 The Problem of Originality by R.E. Stradling … In all ages man must have been faced with the problem of absorbing into his tradition the results of original thinking or flashes of inspiration; the problem becomes peculiarly intense in the present age when new scientific methods are so much to the fore …

p. 439-440 Correspondence – W. R. Lethaby

p. 501 Aerodromes by John Dower – Monday 11 April 1932

pp. 545-567 English Inns by Basil Oliver – Monday 25 April 1932 pp. 560-561 GERMAN STEEL FURNITURE – My final illustration formed the frontispiece of the July 1931 number of Innen-Dekoration, a delightful magazine published in Darmstadt. Actually it is of a reading room, and was designed by Professor Walter Gropius … I show this as a distinct possibility for the furnishing of the public-house of the future. This particular example does not suggest an operating theatre … It is undeniably more hygienic than red sodden plush … Surely, too, if one aims at a light and airy “atmosphere” for public-house interiors, one can, if the central heating system is functioning properly, safely ignore the inevitable hackneyed criticism “It looks cold”?

pp. 620-621 Architecture at the Royal Academy … Mr. Stanley Ramsey’s Proposed Tea Lounge for Winter Gardens, Margate is another example of proper functionalism. Sir John Burnet, Tait and Lorne exhibit more than one design in the modern manner: the Burlington School for Girls, Streatham and a Block of Flats, Guernsey, both being typical of the best restrained English modernism.

pp. 685-692 Art and the People A symposium by Mr. H.S. Goodhart-Rendel, Mr. Eric Gill and Mr. Thomas D. Barlow Eric Gill: … The people – the “people” go to the pictures to see the pictures, not to see the picture palace …

pp. 809-810 Mr. Goodhart-Rendel’s Lectures - A Review by Howard Robertson

pp. 810-811 An Analysis of Modern Architecture by Howard Robertson Reviewed by A.L.N. Russell … Mr. Robertson comments on the general poverty and lack of imagination at present displayed in our attempts to design decorative details for modern buildings … I found abiding comfort, as well as sudden joy, in his passage about the modernist chair which fails in “mental functionalism” and which is “perfectly designed for comfort but is nevertheless so deficient in aesthetic charm that its owner takes no joy in sitting in it, but prefers to patronise some less perfect but more sympathetic piece of furniture” …

R.I.B.A. Journal Volume 40 : November 1932 – October 1933 pp. 63-64 Reviews – Philosopher-Architects The Works of Man by L. March Phillipps The Substance of Architecture by A.S.G. Butler Vitruvian Nights by H.S. Goodhart-Rendel Modern Architectural Design by Howard Robertson Reviewed by William G. Newton Mr. Robertson is one of the few who can walk with Mendelssohn nor lose his common sense … He has studied with critical insight much European work, and has many wise things to say about the claims of structure, function and materials. He sums up what is no doubt a provisional creed by saying that “the real contribution of modernism resides in a revived conception of orderliness.”

p. 91 R.I.B.A. New Premises Competition. By Robert Alkinson F.R.I.B.A. Hall, Easton and Robertson I think their elevation is very fine, very dignified and fills the bill admirably. Press Notices Week-End Review of 7 May had the following:- “The designs exhibit a poverty of invention and a disregard for the amenities of Portland Place, which are only fully apparent when it is realised that the judges have actually awarded the first prize to the best design … It is at least possible to affirm a definite regret that to the modernist devil of the B.B.C. building at the end of Portland Place should now be added this deep sea of conventional mediocrity.” - Robert Byron And the Daily Express of 4 May:- “Even architects have to live in the twentieth century – though you would not think it to look at this exhibition. Nine out of ten of the designs submitted are in the Greco-Swedish departmental-store style – ornate metal grille doors, sham classical pillars, sham modern ‘jazzy’ decorations, refined plaques and friezes – which makes a walk in London’s newer main streets so painful … ” - The Dragoman

p. 111 Membership Lists Applications for Membership Election 9 January 1933 As Fellows – The following Licentiates who have passed the qualifying Examination:- Chermayeff: Sergius Ivan, 173 Oxford Street, W.1; 52 Abbey Road, N.W.8. Proposed by G. Grey Wornum, Edward Maufe and Christian Barman.

p. 142 Reviews – My Book of the Garden by Arthur Stanley. London: Ivor Nicholson and Watson. 1932. Now the serpent, however important in the Garden of Eden, has no place in a rectangular plot.

pp. 234-239 Architectural Education with Special Reference to Part-time Schools by W.S. Purchon, Head of the Welsh School of Architecture, the Technical College, Cardiff With regard to actual work in design, I suppose the outstanding question is that of tradition versus modernism. I am of opinion that in any case the work of the early years – say the first three – should definitely be based on tradition … Give the students as much latitude as they like in short subjects and in buildings of a more or less flippant type, but in more serious work the reproduction of experimental forms should be tactfully discouraged …

pp. 249-276 Glass in Modern Building by M. L. Anderson pp. 261-263, R.I.B.A. series of Technical Articles No. 2 & 266-269 [Some pages have been selected for particular interest including: Hays Wharf, Studios at Broadcasting House by Wells Coates, The Embassy Club, the Savoy Cinema, Acton and the bar at Fischer’s Restaurant.]

pp. 301-303 Factories by Thomas Wallis A paper read before the R.I.B.A. on Monday 20 February 1933 The President, Sir Raymond Unwin, in the Chair The Old Factory and the New Architecture When talking on architecture it is the usual custom to refer to historical structures, but, unfortunately, with industrial architecture there are none existing worth mentioning. Industrial architecture has a clear unfettered birth free from tradition, and I lay claim that it is the pioneer of the new style which I will name “Transgressional” since it may be considered to violate the accepted canons of design … p. 311 Discussion – Mr. Laurence Gotch: There is one small point which has not been referred to. Professor Reilly has criticised the question of factories being on the Great West Road, and Egyptian facades, and so on; but I should like to thank Messrs. Wallis, Gilbert and Partners for the delightful picture one is presented with on coming along home after a good day’s golf and seeing these floodlighted buildings. They give one a sense of joy, so that I wish to thank his firm for the delightful picture they give me when I am on that road. pp. 367-368 Mr. Thomas Wallis has communicated the following answers to the questions that were asked during the discussion that followed the paper on Factories: to Professor C. H. Reilly - I am afraid you did not quite appreciate my words on Modern Architecture. I said until a few years ago the schools did not take up modern design. I fully appreciate the good work they are now doing, and we owe a deep debt of gratitude to Mr. Howard Robertson, Director of the Architectural Association, for his splendid efforts in this direction …

pp. 368-369 Reviews – Housing Problems in the U.S.A. by T. Alwyn Lloyd House Design, Construction and Equipment, Housing Objectives and Programs. Volumes V and XI of President Hoover’s Conference on Home Building and Home Ownership … We are told that in America the standard of decorative design is deplorably low, and that the Committee observed “a common tendency in the use of decorative features unrelated to the underlying structures,” which is not altogether unknown in England! …

p. 371 Accessions to the Library - 1932-1933 – IV History – Hitchcock (Henry Russell) and Johnson (Philip) The International Style: Architecture since 1922.

p. 452 “Where Londoners Work” the third R.I.B.A. public lecture given by Mr. Darcy Braddell “Where Londoners Play” the fourth R.I.B.A. public lecture given by Mr. Morton Shand … The importance of the bar in theatre architecture was emphasised by Mr. Shand, who while admitting that they were very much improved and often very charming, condemned on the whole the modern bar architecture as being a decadent form of the “1925 Parisian jazz manner” … Mr. Shand, speaking of modern theatres, said that he did not think we had yet achieved the proper expression of the age in our theatre architecture. As an exception he quoted the Cambridge Theatre, which gives the necessary feeling of restfulness and avoids the current dangers of “jazz modernism.”

p. 553 Reviews – The Modern Home Design in the Home by Noel Carrington. Reviewed by Michael Dugdale Mr. Carrington rightly scorns the “modernist,” more so the “modernistic.” But by what extra syllables can we execrate the steps up, the steps down, the intricacies and angularities, the jazz modernisticalism that, self-restricted to British examples, he has been compelled to include among his plates? … Sometimes new materials and methods used with more eagerness then intelligence have betrayed designers into error. The new exhilaration that comes from hiding a source of light behind some jazz complication has been responsible for effects resembling toothache more closely than architecture …

p. 556 Accessions to the Library Details - Carrington (N) - Design in the home Allied Arts – British Broadcasting Corporation – Design in modern life (Broadcast talks pamphlets) Gardens – Tipping (H.A.) – The garden to-day

p. 571 Editorial – 27 May 1933 … We therefore welcome the formation of the new Modern Architectural Research Group (commonly known as “Mars”) which, with Mr. Wells Coates as Chairman and Mr. F. R. S. Yorke [A.] as secretary, is to co-operate in the programme of the next and future International Congresses of Modern Architecture [CIAM] …

p. 597-598 Reviews – The Loom of Architecture – reviewed by EJC Architecture in the Balance by Frederic Towndrow

p. 636 Reviews – Houses by Baillie Scott & Beresford Houses and Gardens by M. H. Baillie Scott and A.E. Beresford Reviewed by A.L.N. Russell

p. 656 Editorial – 8 July 1933 The Exhibition of British Industrial Art at present being held at Dorland Hall is a challenge to all those who hold that for all that is best and most up to date in modern design and decoration we must go abroad …

p. 689 Reviews – Thoughts on Modern Architecture The Architecture of a New Era; revolution in the world of appearance by R.A. Duncan – reviewed by Serge Chermayeff

p. 737 Reviews - Mr. Betjeman’s Good Taste Ghastly Good Taste : Or a Depressing Story of the Rise and Fall of English Architecture by John Betjeman – reviewed by John Summerson … Our author’s enthusiasms are for the Regency and the right-up-to-date-modern (not jazz) …

p. 743 Correspondence – Thoughts on Modern Architecture Response by R.A. Duncan to Serge Chermayeff’s review of his book

p. 751 Competitions – Bexhill: Proposed Entertainments Hall

p. 776 Reviews – “Home” Architecture Home Architecture by Newcomb and Foster. 1933. New York … The subject is covered with an astonishing catholicity, ranging from a typical Frank Lloyd Wright drawing of a typical Frank Lloyd Wright house, labelled “House in the Prairie Style (Courtesy of the Western Architect)” to detailed descriptions of the highly developed equipment of modern American houses …

p. 783 5 August – Bexhill competition.

p. 788 Editorial – 9 September 1933 The views of a number of well-known architects have recently been aired in the columns of The Listener, which on 26 July published an Architecture Symposium, demanding from so representative a collection of architects as Sir Reginald Blomfield, Mr. Charles Holden, Professor A.E. Richardson, Mr. W. Curtis Green, Mr. M. H. Baillie-Scott, Mr. Joseph Emberton, Mr. Christian Barman and Mr. Wells Coates an answer to the question “Is Modern Architecture on the Right Track”? …

pp. 798-803 The Permanency of the Classic Tradition by Arthur T. Bolton … It is seldom necessary to oppose violently a new movement, as it will be proved to carry the seeds of its own decay, in so far as it has an alloy of falsehood and exaggeration in its composition … p. 811 Accessions to the Library – 1932-1933 – IX Aesthetics – Betjeman (John) Ghastly good taste or a depressing story of the rise and fall of English architecture British Broadcasting Corporation – Is modern architecture on the right track? [From The Listener, 26 July 1933] Gloag (John) and Fry (F. Maxwell) The need for planning town and countryside [From The Listener, 21 June 1933] Atkinson (Robert) and Gloag (John) Design in public buildings [From The Listener, 14 June 1933 – Design in Modern Life series] Domestic – Fuji (Koji) The Japanese dwelling-house R.I.B.A. Journal Volume 41 : November 1933 – October 1934 pp. 5-14 The Inaugural Address by the President, Sir Giles Gilbert Scott Read before the R.I.B.A. on Monday 6 November 1933 … In my grandfather’s time the fight between Gothic and Classic schools was fierce and relentless … conducted with as much, if not more vigour than the present issue of Traditionalism and Modernism. Pugin was one of the first to start the racket, and my grandfather, writing of the enthusiasm engendered by what he describes as the thunder of Pugin’s writings, says:- “I was from that moment a new man, old things had become new, or rather modernism has passed away from me, and every aspiration of my heart has become mediaeval.” … In architecture, I think this is a consoling thought that extreme Traditionalists and extreme Modernists are serving a useful purpose in cancelling each other out! The President (in reply): … I have said some rather harsh things about Modernism, and I think I led you to believe I am against it. We have a guest to-night one of the ablest exponents of Modernism, I think, in the world, Mr. Erich Mendelsohn, and I am glad to welcome him here. He is an architect of international reputation and I am only sorry that by the order of the proceedings to-night he is unable to get up and, perhaps, completely answer all the accusations which I have made against Modernism to-night. He is bound to silence, and I think I ought to apologise to him for that.

pp. 23-24 Cockfosters Railway Station

p. 28 A Visit to the Underground Railway Stations on the Cockfosters Line on Monday 9 October 1933

p. 39 Accessions to the Library Le Corbusier and Janneret (Pierre) Zwei Wohnhäuser

p. 59 Editorial – 25 November 1933 … To-day Art in Industry is much “in the air” to use the words of the President of the Royal Academy … The B.B.C. has given support by staging a lively series of talks on Design in Modern Life … All this found fruit in the exhibition last spring at Dorland House[sic.] … The increasing readiness of shops and stores to stage exhibitions of goods notable rather for their good design … and at Whiteley’s is a larger exhibition staged by Mr. Serge Chermayeff to illustrate how the excellence of design already achieved in the manufacture of many objects of use can be extended throughout the house.

p. 87 Correspondence – Modernism by Evolution Response to Inaugural Address from Herbert Baker … one of the best gems of Sir Giles address, when he said “I should feel happier about the future of architecture … if Modernism had come by evolution rather than be revolution” …

p. 103 Licentiates and the Fellowship rules Bexhill Competition: date of entry extended to 29.12.33

pp. 109-125 Contemporary London Buildings by Charles Marriott A paper read before the R.I.B.A. on Monday 4 December 1933 The President (Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, R.A.) in the Chair p. 116 … For practical convenience in modern terms controlled by good taste, the minimum flat, by Wells Coates shown at the recent exhibition of Industrial Art at Dorland House[sic.], set a good example in a direction that is bound to be followed, and the same applies to the week-end house, by Mr. Chermayeff. p. 121 More recent shops are mostly ground floors only, and of them a long list could be made. Mr. Trystan Edwards illustrated some excellent examples in his “Architecture of Shops,” and I should like to quote as typical of modern treatment the Cresta shop, Brompton Road, By Mr. Wells Coates …

p. 126-7 The London Architecture Medal, 1932 The Presentation of the R.I.B.A. medal and diploma to Messrs. Sir John Burnet and Partners, Messrs. Campbell, Jones, Sons and Smithers Associated Architects

pp. 165-179 New Materials and New Methods by Serge Chermayeff A paper read before the R.I.B.A. on Monday 18 December 1933 The President (Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, R.A.) in the Chair p. 167 … Professor Julian Huxley spoke in a recent broadcast on applied science of “ Tradition and Prejudice” as synonymous terms … Discussion – Eric Gill: … We are not living in the Middle Ages, nor in the time of the Ancient Greeks, why, therefore, should not nineteenth and twentieth century materials and methods be used in the form which is natural to them in our building?

p. 199 Review of Periodicals – 23 December 1933 Domestic - Architectural Forum (N.Y.) Vol. LIX, 5. November The November Forum, with a special supplement on conversion of old houses, is almost entirely concerned with domestic works and contains many interesting examples new and old … and an article by F. Lloyd Wright … Building. Vol. VIII, 12. December Seven blocks of medium sized flats with rentals of between £100 and £200 p.a., are illustrated and described.

Congress Report – Texnika Xponika (Athens) Vol. B.IV, 44, 45 and 46. 15 October This Greek journal contains the full reports of the fourth International Congress of Modern Architects held in Athens last summer … 34 towns were studied, including London, on which a report had been prepared by the London M.A.R.S. group …

pp. 223, 225 [Technical article on swimming pools – some illustrations showed modern & 229 tendencies: “Showboat” Maidenhead, St. Leonards and Morecambe.]

p. 361 Accessions to the Library – 1933-1934 – IV History - Silcock (A) China’s treasures of art in danger [In The China Review, Jan.-March 1934] Presented by the author Mendelsohn (Eric) Russland, Europa, Amerika [1929] Mendelsohn (Eric) Bauten und Skizzen [1923] Mendelsohn (Eric) Amerika [1928] All presented by the author

p. 365 Review of Periodicals – 10 February 1934 Domestic – Architectural Review. Vol. LXXV. No. 447. February. The one-roomed flat, article and illustrations of several examples.

p. 414-15 The R.I.B.A. Public Lectures on Architecture Traffic and Architecture – The first R.I.B.A. Public Lecture 1934 given on Wednesday 14 February by Mr. W.R. Davidge who dealt with the subject of Modern Architecture in relation to traffic. The Architecture of the Modern Home – Second R.I.B.A. Public Lecture was given on 21 February by Mr. E.B. Maufe … The flat roof, said Mr. Maufe, had been accepted as one of the characteristics of a modern house, but he questioned its value, and pointed to signs that modernists in other countries seemed to be less convinced of its value now than they were ten years ago …

pp. 460-463 The Station and Shopping Centre, Southgate

pp. 472-3 Review of Periodicals – 10 March 1934 Broadcasting Studio – Architects’ Journal Vol. LXXIX. No. 2040. 22 February. The Birmingham Broadcasting Studio (S. Chermayeff) [F.] is well illustrated and described. Domestic – Architects’ Journal Vol. LXXIX. No. 2041. 1 March Working details of a cupboard kitchen in a Chelsea flat by G.K. Green Equipment – Design for To-Day. Vol. I. March 1934 W.F. Crittall on the Window: a brief history of the development of window design. Biography – L’Architecture d’Aujourd’hui. Vol. IV. 3rd Series. 10. Le Corbusier remains the patron saint of modernism, despite the claims of pretenders. The whole of this number is given to an exposition of his ideas and illustrations of his work and an assessment of Corbusier’s place in the history of modernism. All rather self-conscious and a bit smug. Nevertheless of great interest, and indispensable to the student of modernism.

p. 534 The R.I.B.A. Public Lectures on Architecture The Architecture of Shopping – Fifth in the series given on Wednesday 14 March by Mr. Maxwell Fry … Speaking of the position to-day, Mr. Maxwell Fry said that competition and the study of persuasive display is leading to the design of many excellent small shops which show real understanding of the particular problems of shop design and right use of materials …

pp. 557-565 William Morris by Professor J.W. Mackail

pp. 570-573 Eresby House, Rutland Gate London Architects: T. P. Bennet [F] & Son

p. 582 Accessions to the library – 1933-1934 – VII Allied Arts - Blomfield (Sir Reginald) Modernismus London: Macmillian. 1934.

p. 668 Editorial – 19 May 1934 … It is, perhaps, owing to the failure of English architects to appreciate the theories of Philip Webb and Lethaby, which correspond very closely to those of Professor Gropius, that the modern movement is so little understood in this country … it is none the less our clear duty to be intelligently aware of what is going on and to do honour to such an outstanding educationalist and architect as Walter Gropius.

pp. 679-694 The Formal and Technical Problems of Modern Architecture and Planning by Professor Walter Gropius [Detailed histories of a) the Bauhaus and b) the modern movement worldwide] p. 686 … Vigorous young groups have been formed in Czechoslovakia, Poland, Spain and England, while a very active Japanese group exists at Osaka. p. 688 … The second objection, that mass-production of dwellings would cause the destruction of handicrafts, can be countered by the pertinent example of the Japanese, who for centuries have been making completely standardised houses of the highest quality carried out by manual labour …

p. 703 The Opening of the Gropius Exhibition The Exhibition of the work of Professor Walter Gropius, which is being held at the R.I.B.A. from the 15 to the 21 May was opened on Tuesday, 15 May, by Sir Raymond Unwin … In speaking of the new movement as illustrated by Professor Gropius’s work, Sir Raymond said that tradition would continue to mean to him and to many an association of things which we have loved and things which we have found beautiful, an aurora which we cannot altogether break through. We must not expect fully to understand all the new ventures in architecture, the new forms and the new structures …

pp. 704-706 Book Reviews – “Who will deliver us from the Greeks and Romans”? Modernismus by Sir Reginald Blomfield. Reviewed by W. Veron Crompton … “Modernismus” is the reflection in art of this collapse, from which only “fundamentalism” seems to have been snatched from chaos or the vortex … Naturally, at the sight of “functionalism” he has rushed in and has dealt quite shrewdly with the slack and hazy thinking of Mr. Towndrow, Mr. Emberton and others about this blessed word …

p. 706 Photograph of Professor Gropius’s own house at Dessau

p. 708 Accessions to the library – 19 May 1934 Allied Arts – Holme (C.G.) Editor, The Studio Yearbook of decorative art.

p. 710 Review of Periodicals – 19 May 1934 Factories – Architectural Record. Vol. LXXV. No. 3. March The Tokyo factory of the Otis Elevator Co. (A. Raymond). A modern, steel frame building. Domestic – Architects’ Journal. Vol. LXXIX, No. 2048. 19 April A block of flats in Peckham, designed by E. Maxwell Fry [A], of Adams, Thompson and Fry, is illustrated by model and plans. This is a very important contribution to the problem of industrial housing. The whole scheme is based on “rigorous standardization” of accommodation and structural units to lower costs without any lowering of accommodation standards. The article should be read by everyone interested in the subject.

p. 722 Exhibition in the R.I.B.A. Galleries The exhibition of the works of Professor Walter Gropius, the celebrated German architect, now being held in the R.I.B.A. Galleries, will be open from 23 to 26 May inclusive, between the hours of 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. (Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.)

The Licentiateship of the R.I.B.A. and the Architects (Registration) Act & The use of the Titles “Chartered Architect and “ Registered Architect” Competitions – Olympia: Exhibition Stand Messrs. Venesta, Ltd., invite architects resident in Great Britain and under the age of 30 on 31 January 1935 to submit in competition designs for an exhibition stand to display Venasta plywoods at the Building Trades Exhibition at Olympia in September 1934 …

p. 723 Competition for the Lay-out of an “Ideal Village” The proprietors of the Builder invite suggestions for the general lay-out of an Ideal Village on garden city lines, suitable for a population of about 5,000 persons …

p. 728 Editorial – 2 June 1934 The photograph of William Burges at the foot of this page is published for two good reasons. First because it is a recent gift of unusual interest to the R.I.B.A. from Mr. Beresford Pite … secondly in order that it may be used as a peg on which to hang a request to senior members of the Institute to look through their collections and to give the R.I.B.A. Library any photographs of nineteenth century architects which they may have …

pp.768-769 Review of Periodicals – 2 June 1934 Shops and Offices – Design for To-day. Vol II. No. 14. June An article on shop-fronts illustrated by a number of examples, good and bad. Gardens – Mon F. Bunkunst u. Stadtebau. Vol. XVIII. No.5. May German gardens illustrated and described in two articles. Profile. Vol. 2. No. 4. April A special number on small gardens and flowers. General – L’Architecture Vivante. 1933. Winter issue “Au revoir a l’Architecture Vivante’!” is the heading to the foreword by le Corbusier which we are pleased to find has no direct architectural significance since the au revoir refers only, though unhappily, indeed, to the periodical and not the style of design with which it and le Corbusier are associated. This last number contains excellent photos, details and descriptions of Corbusier’s Swiss pavilion in the Paris Cite Universitaire and a house in Algiers …

pp. 806-813 Synthesis in Architecture : The Contemporary Process by Lionel B. Budden – Roscoe Professor of Architecture in the University of Liverpool A public inaugural lecture delivered in the University 2 March 1934 p. 811 … In modern – or, as it might more appropriately be called, rational – architecture, the approach to the solution of any given problem is p. 812 primarily logical … Though we continually hear of “the modern style” in architecture the term is meaningless. There is and can be as yet no p. 813 modern style … At present we have to recognise that we are in the initial stages of a period that is above everything else one of transition …

pp. 814-818 The Architect and Housing by the Speculative Builder by C. Bertram Parkes, L.R.I.B.A. also 24 February pp. 385-392 and 28 April pp. 649-53.

pp. 828-829 Review of Periodicals – 23 June 1934 Exhibition Buildings – Architect and Building News. Vol. CXXXVIII, No. 3415. 1 June. The Penguin pool at the London Zoo by “Tecton” an amusing and efficient new concrete building. Construction Moderne. Vol. XLIX. No. 36 and 37. 3-10 June The scheme by A.G. Perret and by Tournon and Chappey for the 1937 Paris Exhibition on the site of the Trocadero – perspective views and plans. Cinemas – Building. Vol. IX. No. 6. June “Dreamland,” Margate. An entertainment pavilion and cinema ( J.B. Iles [A.] and Leathart and Granger [F.F.] ) Housing and Domestic – Builder. Vol. CXCVI. No. 476. 8 June. Plans and illustrations of several large schemes for middle-class flats in London … General – Architectural Record. Vol. LXXV. No. 5. May Special “New Architecture” number illustrating many good modern buildings in Europe and America and Japan.

pp. 830-831 Accessions to the Library – 1933-1934 – X – 23 June 1934 Building Types – Fry (E. Maxwell) English town hall architecture. [From The Listener, 18 April 1934] Oliver (Basil) The Modern public house. London 1934 Domestic – Gropius (Walter) Rehousing in big cities – outwards or upwards? [From The Listener, 16 May 1934] Topography and Maps – Aerofilms Limited Air survey and map revision London [1934] Presented by the Company

pp. 832-833 Correspondence – Professor Gropius and Architectural Theory From Denis Winston [A.] of Harvard, Massachusetts to Gropius’s paper … Professor Gropius continues: “The very nature of architecture makes it dependent on the mastery of space.” So, of course, does the very nature of horse-racing or making mud pies; the sentence appears to have no significance …

pp. 845-864 Modern Practice in Brickwork p. 854 Photograph of “Dreamland.” Margate. Broad scale textual effects achieved by projecting courses and a rustic-faced brick

p. 886 Reviews – Common Sense and Furniture English Furniture by John Gloag (In series:- The Library of English Art) London. Black. 1934 – reviewed by John C. Rogers … how English furniture design has since A.D. 1500 reflected the changes in national taste and how a tradition of comfort and comeliness has been maintained, whether furniture has been made from oak or mahogany or tubular plated steel or plywood.

p. 887 Review of Periodicals – 7 July 1934 Exhibition Buildings – Architecture (Paris). Vol. XLVII. No. 6. 15 June. New buildings at the Paris Zoo designed by MM. Chausse-miche and Letrosne after visits to all the other leading European Zoos. The buildings are simple, all the imagination of the designers has been concentrated on the naturalistic open-air enclosures with ambitiously conceived rock-terraced caves and paddocks. Libraries – Pencil Points. Vol. XV. No. 6. June Supplement of illustrated details of Bookshelves in private houses.

p. 896 Competitions – Results of the Venesta Stand competition The premium of £100 for a preliminary design for a stand for Venesta Limited at the Building Trades’ Exhibition has been awarded to:- Mr. F. Skinner, c/o Tecton, 57 Haymarket, London S.W.1

p. 927-929 Book Reviews – Professor Goodhart-Rendel’s Slade Lectures Fine Art by H.S. Goodhart-Rendel. Oxford and Clarendon Press. 1934 reviewed by W. Vernon Crompton

p. 929-930 Theory and Practice The Modern House by F.R.S. Yorke. London. The Architectural Press 1934 – reviewed by EJC Some weeks ago Professor Walter Gropius, in a Paper which he read to the Design and Industries Association and which was published in this Journal, said that adherents of modern style must beware of “artistic aspirations” and superficial slickness in technique. His audience, which was composed of most of the doctrinaires and practitioners of modernism in London, was so exultant in its applause of the first phrase … that it had no chance of hearing the second … This review would never have been so long if The Modern House had not proved to be such a delightful and provocative book which must obviously find a place on every architect’s bookshelf, so that he can train and entertain himself by puzzling out how half the buildings in the book came to be there except on their purely aesthetic merits.

pp. 931-932 Accessions to the Library – 1933-1934 – XI – 21 July 1934 Domestic – Yorke (F.R.S.) The Modern house. London 1934 Allied Arts – Gloag (John) Design in modern life, by Robert Atkinson, Elizabeth Denby, E. Maxwell Fry etc. London. 1934 Town and Country Planning – Council for Research on Housing Construction Slum clearance and rehousing. London 1934

p. 933 Review of Periodicals – 21 July 1934 Theatres and Cinemas – Journal of the Institute of Japanese Architects. Vol. XLVIII. No. 585. May An article which is luckily well illustrated, the text being in Japanese, on recent Japanese cinemas and theatres. Exhibition Buildings – Architectural Review. Vol. LXXVI. No. 452. July. The Penguin Pool at the London Zoo. Illustrated by photographs taken before the tenants took up residence.

p. 967-974 The Nurses’ House, The Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street, W.C.1. Architects: Stanley Hall and Easton & Robertson.

p. 982-983 Accessions to the Library – 11 August 1934 Allied Arts – Gill (Eric) Art and a changing civilisation. London 1934 Drawings – Burgess (William) Three grotesque designs for wood carving i. Frog with viol. ii. Frog with stagbeetle. iii. Frog with riding snail. Presented by Sir W. Goscombe John. R.A.

pp. 983-984 Review of Periodicals – 11 August 1934 Domestic – Builder. Vol. CXLVII. No. 4772. 20 July The Lawn Road Flats (Wells Coates). A very interesting block of “minimum” flats, i.e. bed-sitting rooms with small dressing and bathrooms and kitchen pantry. The only flats of their type in England and deserving close study for their construction, planning and design.

p. 992 Competitions: Results of Gidea Park Modern Homes Exhibition “E” Messrs. Skinner and Tecton

pp.1016-1020 Tenements Wilcove Place, St. Marylebone, N.W.1. Architect: Louis de Soissons, O.B.E. [F.] S.A.D.G.

p. 1026 Accessions to the Library – 8 September 1934 Smeeton (R.A.) Modern domestic building in timber (R.I.B.A. Final Examination thesis.) 1934 Presented by the author.

pp.1027-1028 Review of Periodicals – 8 September 1934 Hospitals etc. – Journal of the Institute of Japanese Architects. Vol. XLVIII. No. 587. July Description (in Japanese) and illustrations of the Kôraku Hospital and Laboratory of the Japanese foundation for Cancer Research, the Sanatorium of the Fukui Red Cross Hospital. Housing and Domestic – Building. Vol. IX. No. 8. August. Flats. An article by J.R. Leathart describing six recent London buildings and a short article by T.P. Bennett on Points in Planning, also detailed description of Latymer Court Hammersmith (Gordon Jeeves [F]) and of a flat scheme in Brighton by Wells Coates and of the Lawn Road Flats, also by Wells Coates … Building Times, Vol. IV. No. 9. August Illustrated account of the Lawn Road Flats (Wells Coates), a modern concrete building a single room service flats. Architects’ Journal. Vol. LXXX. No. 2066-7. 23 August Four blocks of bed sitting room flats. Little Orford Street, Chelsea (Austin Blomfield [A.]) Embassy Court, Brighton, a design. Flats by Wells Coates.

p. 1033 The Engineering Society of Japan The death is announced of Baron Furuichi, for many years President of Nihon Kogakkai, the Engineering of Japan. In 1929 Baron Furuichi presided over the World Engineering Congress. Baron Shiba has been elected President of Nihon Kogakkai in his place.

p. 1066 Accessions to the Library – 1933-1934 – XIV Domestic – Gidea Park: Modern Homes Exhibition [catalogue] 9”. 128 pp. London. 1934. 6d. R.

R.I.B.A. Journal Volume 42 : November 1934 – October 1935 The R.I.B.A. Centenary 1834-1934

p. 123 The Opening Ceremony The following were present at the opening ceremony on 8 November: … Mr. S. Chermayeff; Mrs. Chermayeff … Mr. E, Maxwell Fry; Mrs. Fry

pp. 128-132 A House in Jersey. Architect: A.B. Grayson, A.A.Dip. [A.]. 24th November 1934

pp. 135-136 Reviews - The Modern Garden Garden Design of Today. By Percy S. Crane. p. 136 Designs on the Public – Design in Modern Life by Robert Atkinson; Elizabeth Denby; E. Maxwell Fry; James Laver; Frank Pick; A. B. Read; Gordon Russell. Edited by John Gloag. 1934 … With the increasing activities of the Design and Industries Association, assisted by the B.B.C., and by the fact that the Royal Academy itself is opening its doors in January next to an Exhibition of Art in Industry, one is made aware that a determined assault is being made on the mind and feelings of the general public with regard to design …

p. 138 Balconies for Babies [Letter on the subject of the provision of balconies in tenement buildings was prepared by the R.I.B.A. and submitted to the Minister for Health.] p. 139 The R.I.B.A. memorandum on balconies for babies was honoured by “The Times” with a fourth leader on the subject under the much more engaging title than the official one – “Babies for Balconies.” Letter from Gladys Thornely to Sir Giles Gibert Scott on the subject. [The subject of fresh air and babies was topical in the 1930s – a Japanese nursery on show at the Ideal Home Exhibition in 1930 was much praise for its ventilation]

p. 146 Exhibition of the R.I.B.A. International Architecture 1924-1934 30 November 1934 – 3 January 1935

pp. 151-152 Editorial – 8 December 1934 An unofficial conference event – unofficial as far as the R.I.B.A. was concerned – was the wireless debate between the staunch champions of two schools of architectural thought, Sir Reginald Blomfield, R.A., and Mr. Amyas Connell. In a careless moment we almost wrote “architecture old and new,” but realised in time that the supporters of both traditionalism and modernism claim that theirs is the only truly traditional form of building and the only architecture of the future. The other is dead so says one side, or sterile says the other …

pp. 167-178 Ornament in Modern Architecture; Unneighbourliness in Buildings Papers read to the conference at the meeting held in the Henry Jarvis Memorial Hall, on Friday 23 November. The President, Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, R.A., in the Chair. p. 167 Ornament in Modern Architecture by Mr. Kenneth Clark, M.A., [Hon. A.] Director of the National Gallery … our best architects have created a style of such severity that every decorative motive, even the simplest moulding, has been excluded. They have created what in the last century would have been considered a contradiction in terms; an architecture without ornament … p. 170 Unneighourliness in Buildings by Mr. F. B. Malim, Headmaster of Wellington College p. 174 Discussion – Mr. Henry M. Fletcher: … Among the influences to which Mr. Clark referred as leading to the present absence or skimpiness of ornament. I do not think he mentioned fashion, and that is a strong motive in all changes in style. It has become the fashion to cut out anything that can be called ornament … p. 175 Mr. James Saunders: I should like to say a few words with regards to the unneighbourliness of buildings … now that I live at Southend-on-Sea, which is a new town and which has been developed by the speculative builder, I seriously think that it would be better if some form of regulation could be made which would enforce a degree of neighbourliness in all buildings erected in these new towns … p. 176 Mr. W.S.B. Purchon: … McIntosh[sic.] in Glasgow played a very big part at the beginning of our present modern methods, and many of us realise that it was unfortunate that in his day so many of us paid particular attention not to the big things that he was doing but to the little things. There were too many imitators of the little tricks of the modernism of that time … Mr. M.S. Briggs : …There is one thing he [Kenneth Clark] omitted in his study of the place of ornament, especially in small houses. He touched very delicately on the position of pictures in the small flat, but he said nothing about the absence or the presence of books in the small flat. Everybody who has seen a perfectly designed room knows that books do lend an element of colour to the decoration, and many of the present flats seem to be rather unsuited for that particular form of ornament …

p. 203 The Opening of the Exhibition of International Architecture by H.R.H. the Princess Royal, Friday 30 November 1934

p. 212-213 Obituary – Arthur Beresford Pite, M.A. (Hon) Canta. FRIBA

pp. 259-263 Ideals in Architecture by Beresford Pite An address to students of the Royal Technical College, Glasgow, November 1933. Mr. Beresford Pite offered this paper to the Journal shortly before he died. It is published as an apposite companion to the obituaries which appeared in the last number of the Journal and are published in this number. – Ed. … If, as it appears, modern architecture has elected to forgo connection with the forms of its evolutionary history, as furnishing means of expression, and to be neither progressive, nor, if you will, retrogressive – in short, to build without architecture as hitherto understood, fulfilling Professor Lethaby’s half-humorous advice “to rub out the architecture” from our designs – the non-existence of any positive ideal or basis of idea has eventuated, and a situation has arisen which craves the attention of this harassed but earnest student … It may then be necessary to recreate the ideals of the recent past in order to escape from the inevitable concrete frame of a bare constructional reasonableness, which would result in a mongrel cross between the Crystal Palace and a ferro-concrete engine shed … sit down to the clean double-elephant sheet; accept inevitable conditions, triumph over constructive problems and await that afflatus from limbo, neither Greek, Latin, Gothic nor far Eastern, the idiosyncrasy requisite to idealism and architecture …

p. 266 Letters of congratulations on the completion of the new R.I.B.A. building and the centenary from: The Institute of Japanese Architects and The Nippon Architects’ Association.

p. 268 Correspondence - Balconies for Babies Letter from Reginald Rowe, Chairman of the Housing Centre

p. 269-270 Book Reviews – Skyscrapers Building to the Skies – The Romance of the Skyscaper by Alfred C. Bossom, London: The Studio – reviewed by Francis Lorne … I am sorry to miss in the book illustrations of the work of Sullivan, Frank Lloyd Wright … Mr. Bossom commences his final chapter … by saying that he is “definitely against skyscrapers in England,” but he does not give very convincing reasons for it … Corbusier of Paris has the idea to erect a large skyscraper in the centre of each city block … It is perhaps the ideal city of the future, and, provided we live better, what do we care where the ideas by which we live come from? …

p. 276 Review of Periodicals – 22 December 1934 Housing (Domestic) – Architects’ Journal. Vol. LXXX. No. 2080. 29 November. R. E. Sassoon House, Peckham. (Adams Thompson and Fry). One of the most important completely modern blocks of low rent flats yet built in the country. The experimental nature of the design is reduced to the minimum by a proper reliance on Continental precedent and open-minded consideration of each detail of plan and construction. Architect and Building News. Vol. CXL. No. 3439. 16 November Flats at Lyme Grove, Hackney, for the Shoreditch Housing Association (John Dower), the result of exact reasoning to produce the most economic solution, this scheme is a valuable contribution to the problem of low cost housing on urban sites … Building. Vol. IX. No. 12. December A short description and plans and views of the scheme of a “modernist” town, Frinton Park, on the Essex Coast, Mr. Oliver Hill is the controlling architect and there are houses by 19 of the most advanced firms of English architects.

p. 277 Obituary – Beresford Pite by Mr. Goodhart Rendel

p. 292 Editorial – 12 January 1935 Description of new library Brief overview of the Exhibition of International Architecture

pp. 293-310 Modern Church Architecture by Mr. Edward Maufe Read before the R.I.B.A. on Monday 17 December 1934

pp. 313-316 British Industrial Art at the Royal Academy by A. Llewellyn Smith [Detailed description of the design of each gallery: Architectural Room – Mr. Charles Holden Gallery I (Ceramics) – Professor Goodhart-Rendel, (Glassware) – Mr. Maxwell Fry, Gallery E (Silverware and Leather) – Mr. John Grey etc] … it is possible to hold that the display in this Exhibition is disproportionately elaborate and expensive. In this respect perhaps the 1933 Dorland Hall Exhibition more nearly achieved the right balance … As regards dinner- and tea-sets, which form the bulk of the section, the chief honours undoubtedly go to designers working in the trade, notably Freda Beardmore, Millicent Taplin, Susie Cooper and Truda Carter …

pp. 326-327 Book Reviews – Art in Industry by W.G. Holford Art and Industry by Herbert Read. 1934 Industrial Art Explained by John Gloag. 1934 … Readers of Art Now and Unit One will find Mr. Read more lucid in this book and more convincing. Perhaps this is due to the nature of the subject, which has obviously demanded the clearest of thinking; perhaps it is due to the lead given by Dr. Gropius …

pp. 328-329 Accessions to the Library – 1934-1935 – II – 12 January 1935 Theory – Blomfield (Sir Reginald) and Connell (A.D.) For and against modern architecture (From The Listener 28 Nov.1934) History – Le Corbusier et Pierre Jeanneret oeuvre complete de 1929-1934. Zurich. 1935 Williams-Ellis (Clough) and Summerson (John) Architecture here and now. London. 1934 Domestic – Mendelsohn (Erich) Neues Haus – Neue Welt. Berlin. 1933 Allied Arts – Read (Herbert) Art and Industry. London. 1934 Quennell (Marjorie and C.H.B.) A History of everyday things in England, 1851-1934. London. 1934

pp. 376-380 Motor Coach Garages Near London Architects: Wallis, Gilbert & Partners

pp. 384-385 Reviews – Twentieth-Century Houses by Raymond McGrath reviewed by A. Trystan Edwards … This book is a blend of information and propaganda … consists of brief biographies of no fewer than 128 modern architects, one quarter of whom are British and the rest citizens of fourteen European countries, U.S.A. and Japan … The historical section shows a wide knowledge of the modernist movement in architecture, and the author traces the connection between the work of innovators like Otto Wagner, Lloyd Wright and Dudok with William Morris, Lethaby, Mackintosh and other English rebels against the Classic tradition … An alternative “system” of architectural composition, sponsored by Le Corbusier is mentioned … This is based upon a method of “guiding lines and triangles,” … And when the “artist” begins to juggle with these little triangles, that, of course, is the point at which the mathematician walks out of the room! Architectural composition seems a poor thing if it can be explained, as Le Corbusier professes to explain it, in terms of mathematics of a scarcely higher level than that reached in Standard I of an elementary school …

pp. 386-387 Everyday Things Once Again by Percival M. Fraser A History of Everyday Things in England, 1851-1934 written and illustrated by Marjorie and C.H.B. Quennell. 1934 … There is an odd confusion of thought in the extra-ordinary statement that “Reinforced concrete is, after all, not very real building, because it depends on the carpenter … and this adds to the cost.” The same could obviously be said regarding bricks, cast iron and much else. It cannot surely be the authors’ intention to decry a material which has opened up new vistas in architectural design and infinite possibilities in the matter of construction …

p. 389 Review of Periodicals – 26 January 1935 Sports Buildings – Architects’ Journal. Vol. LXXXI, No. 2086. 10 January. P. 54. Blackpool Pleasure Beach. (Joseph Emberton) An efficient and imaginative combination of every type of amusement contrivance. Domestic – Architects’ Journal. Vol. LXXXI, No, 2087. 17 January. P. 113. An analysis of a block of flats by Lubetkin and Tecton at Highgate. An important article of value to every one concerned in this type of work. Illustrates the essential architectural process of thought applied to the solution of a modern problem in which the designers have made an unusually conscious attempt to reason from first principles. Architects’ Journal. Vol. LXXXI, No. 2086. 10 January. P. 58. Modernist house at Bognor (A.M. Chitty and Tecton). Reinforced concrete and severely “functional.” Architect and Building News. Vol. CXLI, No. 3447. 11 January Apartment House, Paris by Le Corbusier and Jeanneret.

pp. 405-410 An Address to Students read by Mr. A. H. Moberly before the R.I.B.A. on Monday 28 January 1935 … If your blood boils when you hear the word “Modernism” or “Traditionalism” you are not in the right frame of mind to decide what the architecture of the twentieth century ought to be … See that your opinions are really your own, based on good reason, not on mass prejudice. Witch-hunting, Jew-baiting, blood-feuds and war passions are among the more evil manifestations of herd psychology and the crowds which grow hysterical over the arrival of a film star among its more silly ones … I think it is clear that the modern movement in architecture has sprung from intense convictions, and that it has met with such a world-wide response because it has everywhere appealed to the sanity and to the adventurousness of the younger generation. But I look forward to its future with both hope and fear … If the modern movement is able to use scholarship intelligently, and is able to distinguish clearly between the logical implications of new methods of construction and the idiosyncrasies of those who merely attempt novelty, there is a real hope of the development of a fine imaginative architecture of the twentieth century …

pp. 437-438 The Value of Simplicity to the Teacher and the Student by G.D. Gordon Hake – A paper read to a conference of those engaged in the teaching of Architecture, held at the R.I.B.A. on Saturday, 19 January. The Chairman of the Board of Architectural Education, Mr. A. H. Moberly was in the chair. … The one outstanding lead that is being given to-day in the direction of simplicity is, I think, to be noticed in the fine arts. In architecture, perhaps, this is most noticeable. It is a curious paradox that, at a time when technical complexities are greater than ever before, when the whole field of man’s decorative development is temptingly open to us, we are producing, on the whole, buildings of great fundamental simplicity. We are agreed, I imagine, that this movement which can be seen equally in sculpture and the other arts, is largely a protest against the wrong thinking of our immediate ancestors, and also a genuine attempt to get back to fundamental principles, and, in the case of architecture, economic realities …

p. 439 Schools of Art, Architecture and Technology on the Continent by Howard Robertson – from Mr. Howard Robertson’s Godwin Bursary Report for 1933.

p. 453 Reviews – Modern Planning and Design and the Public Town and Country Planning in Wiltshire. An explanatory booklet issued by the Wiltshire Joint Planning Committee. … most of the pamphlet is given to recommendations on building materials and design. This is one of the most fundamental problems of modern architecture. Modern architecture, if it is to be properly alive and not merely maintained by blood transfusions from older styles, must evolve its own criteria. Local materials can often be well and economically used to-day …

Architecture and Music by Alexander Walton. 1934 Reviewed by S.E. Dykes Bower … and, once he has established his premises to his satisfaction, writes a final chapter on Modernism in Architecture and Music which is easily the best thing in the book. Whether it is all of it strictly fair is perhaps a matter of opinion and not very important. As a spirited debating attack it has excellent points to make and makes them neatly and forcibly.

pp. 460-461 School Notes – Glasgow School of Architecture The increased responsibility which is imposed on the architect in modern times, with regard to both building construction and amenity, was emphasised by Sir George Macdonald, former Permanent Head of the Scottish Education Department, when he addressed the students of the Glasgow School of Architecture on 5 December in the Royal Technical College … They now thought of getting their effects by mass and dignity of line and accuracy of spacing. The first to give expression to those ideas in his work was a Glasgow architect of great originality, the late Charles Rennie Mackintosh, who was held in higher honour in some foreign countries than in his own …

p. 468 Editorial At one time there was a bad habit, which has now luckily been thrown over, of accepting very nearly everything that was offered [to the library], and a deplorable collection of valueless nineteenth- and early twentieth-century “junk” is the result.

p. 500-502 The Library Exhibition

p. 509 Accessions to the Library Wright (G.N.) The Chinese Empire illustrated by Thomas Allum. Presented by Mr. J. E. Yebury

pp. 554-555 Accessions to the Library Details – Whittick (Arnold) Symbols for designers. 1935 Allied Arts – Gloag (John) Industrial art explained. 1934

pp. 573-592 Royal Academy Exhibition of British Art in Industry by Mr. John De La Valette and Mr. J. Spedan Lewis - Paper read before the R.I.B.A. on Monday, 11 March – Mr. W. H. Ansell, Vice-President, in the Chair pp. 575-576 Mr. De La Valette: … For those whose theories about modernism were quite rightly shocked by Professor Goodhart-Rendel’s cheerful indifference to them, Gallery II provided the antidote. “Here,” they would exclaim, with sighs of relief and approbation, “here is real up-to-date fitness for purpose, coupled with a truly modernistic appearance” …

pp. 593-599 No.7 West Heath Close, Hampstead Architects: Percy Tubbs, Son and Duncan [AA.]

pp. 607-608 Reviews – The Question of Design – reviewed by A. G. Gibson Design by Noel Carrington. 1935 The Conquest of Ugliness by John de la Valette. 1935 Decorative Art, 1935. The Studio Year Book. … The year book has done great work in the past in making up lost ground, but the time is nearly here when a more fundamental attitude towards design will be necessary, if it is not to become merely a stagnant backwater of taste.

pp. 609-10 Review of Periodicals – 23 March 1935 Theatres and Cinemas – Architectural Record/ Vol. LXXVII. No. 2. February. P. 87… Also Auditoriums for women’s college in Tokyo. By Antonin Raymond, illustrated by model. An extremely interesting building in reinforced concrete a la Perret Brothers … Broadcasting Studio – Architects’ Journal. Vol. LXXXI, No. 2093. 28 February. P. 329. The B.B.C. Newcastle Studios. (Wells Coates.) Flats – The Architect and Building News. Vol. CXLI. No. 3455. 8 March. P. 305. & Building. Vol. X. No. 3. March. P. 108. Avenue Close, flats in Avenue Road, London, by Stanley Hall and Easton and Robertson [FF.] Rentals from £675 for a seven bedroom flats to £375 for three bedroom flats.

p. 629 The Work of Smith & Brewer by Henry Martineau Fletcher M.A., F.R.I.B.A. – Monday 25 March

p. 666 Accessions to the Library – 6 April 1935 Educational – Robertson (Howard) Schools of art, architecture and technology on the Continent. (Godwin Bursary, 1933, report.) (With plans and 5 prospectuses in pocket.) Allied Arts and Archaeology – Studio, publ. Decorative art. 1935. C. G. Holme. Ed. Carrington (Noel) Design and a changing civilisation. 1935 De La Valette (John), editor The Conquest of ugliness. (By var. authors.) 1935

p. 685 The Royal Gold Medal – Presentation to Mr. W.M. Dudok [Hon. Corresponding member] – 15 April 1935

p. 732 Reviews – Garden and Landscape Design Landscape and Garden. The bound volume of the publication of the Institute of Landscape Architects. Edited by Richard Studell. London. 1934

p. 733 Review of Periodicals – 27 April 1935 Builder. Vol. CXLVIII. No. 4810. 12 April. P. 683. Clinics and Welfare Buildings - Sir Owen William’s building for the Pioneer Health Centre, Peckham. One of the most interesting social and welfare buildings of recent times. Architect’s Journal. Vol. LXXXI. No. 2099. 11 April. P. 551 Cinemas – Builder. Vol. CXLVIII. No. 4809. 5 April. P. 631 & Architect and Building News. Vol. CXLII. No. 3459. 5 April. P. 13. Dreamland Cinema, Margate (Iles, Leathart and Granger [A.FF.])

pp. 737-738 Obituary – Basil Champneys by Sir Reginald Blomfield, R.A. … Champneys, essentially an individualist, never joined the Institute, and in the famous but now forgotten controversy of “Architecture, a Profession or an Art,” he was one of those who signed the memorial to the R.I.B.A. in 1891, opposing the registration of architects. With him were Shaw, Bodley, Jackson, Bentley, Butterfield, Arthur Blomfield, Ford Madox Brown, Sedding and most of the known young architects of the time; Holman Hunt, William Morris, Walter Crane, twelve academicians and associates …

pp. 753-773 Modern Lighting by Waldo Maitland A.R.I.B.A., A.A.Dip.

pp. 779-780 Royal Academy Exhibition, 1935 by H. Austen Hall [F.] … A number of designs for flats are included in the exhibition, and it must be said with regret that the majority of these are not good. Nothing changes the face of our towns so quickly as these great blocks, generally the biggest things of their kind in the view …

p. 788 Review of Periodicals – 11 May 1935 Flats – Architects’ Journal. Vol. LXXXI. No. 2102. 2 May. P. 660. Special number on Residential Flats. A useful reference illustrating a number of the best recent modern style flats in England, including Highpoint, Highgate, by Tecton [AA.]; King’s Court, Ravenscroft Park, by J.H. Minty [F.]; Highfield Court, Golders Green, by A.V. Pilichowski [A.] … Town Planning – Architectural Record. Vol. LXXVIII. No. 4. April. P. 243. Frank Lloyd Wright describes “Broadacre City,” an ideal community; “a general decentralisation and architectural re-integration of all units into one fabric.” Explained by means of a large model made by Wright and his apprentices at Taliesin, Wisconsin.

p. 800 Editorial – 25 May 1935 Discussion on saving The Red House – market value £4,000 … notice of the formation of a British section of the International Re-Union of Architects … which has its members architects from most European countries … There will be, however, a number of papers by experts on various aspects of modern architecture … Mr. Howard Robertson is Chairman and Mr. E. Goldfinger hon. secretary …

pp. 832-833 Book Reviews – Philip Webb and His Work by W.R. Lethaby. 1935 reviewed by Christian Barman

pp. 835-836 Review of Periodicals – 25 May 1935 Zoos – Architects’ Journal. Vol. LXXXI. No. 2103. 9 May Shelter at Whipsnade Zoo. (Lubetkin and Tecton) Shops – Architectural Review. Vol. LXXVII. No. 462. May. P. 217 The Modern Store. Article by Professor C.H. Reilly Welfare Buildings and Clinics – Architectural Review. Vol. LXXVII. No. 462. May. P. 193. The Pioneer Health Centre (Owen Williams). Described and analysed by J. M. Richards [A.] Domestic – Architectural Review. Vol. LXXVII. No. 462. May. P.188. Analytical description of the site planning of a large scheme of flats in a park near Windsor to be built by Walter Gropius and Maxwell Fry [A.]. The buildings have 8 storeys and are distinctly modern in concept. The whole scheme illustrates admirably the modern approach to the problem of housing estate development. General – Architecture d’Aujourd’hui. Vol. V. No. 4. April. P. 46. Japan. Special articles on Japanese architecture, traditional and modern. Excellently illustrated by plans and photos of modern buildings, mostly in Tokyo or Osaka.

pp. 882-888 Earthquake Resisting Design by C. Reginald Ford – A paper read before the New Zealand Institute of Architects on 27 February 1935 … I believe I am right in saying that there has been one measurement by a seismograph of an earthquake motion in the actual area of damage in a disastrous earthquake, and that was for five seconds only in the University of Tokio during the 1923 earthquake …

p. 892 Review of Periodicals – 8 June 1935 Exhibition Buildings – Kentiju[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo). Vol. XXIX. No. 4. April. The 1935 Yokohama Exhibition. Illustrations of the buildings. Restaurant – Architects’ Journal. Vol. LXXXI. No. 2105. 23 May. P, 807 & Architect and Building News. Vol. CXLII. No. 3466. 24 May. Restaurant at Whipsnade Zoo (Lubetkin, Drake and Tecton), a simple reinforced concrete structure.

pp. 905-917 British Architects’ Conference at Glasgow – 19-22 June 1935 The Inaugural Meeting in the Fore Hall of the University held at 10.20 a.m. on Thursday, 20 June 1935, The President, Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, R.A., in the Chair p. 907 The Presidential Address: … The present controversy of Modernism versus Traditionalism is the same issue under other names. Modernism, by its attempt to approach architecture purely from the functional and materialistic point of view, appeals to the scientific or thinking side of our minds, and by its extremism has made, by contrast, all Traditionalists appear Romantics … the extreme Modernists might like to chisel and enamel the chalk cliffs of England to make them smooth and shiny and render them more in keeping with the slick machinery ideal of their dreams … p. 908 … with the result that modern architecture is becoming monotonous and boring, and the prospect of continuous playing on these two notes for ever is alarming. One wonders what escape there is from the apparent cul-de-sac into which modernism seems to have found itself … But modern developments have undoubtedly brought a breath of fresh air into what had become a stagnant architectural atmosphere … p. 909 Glasgow has produced men who have had considerable influence upon developments of modern architectural thought, including Mackintosh, considered by some to be the first Modernist, and from whom the pioneer Continental modernists derived inspiration … p. 910 Sir John Stirling-Maxwell’s Speech: … We also know that it is very difficult to apply traditional designs to new types of building. Is it possible? Must there be a complete break with tradition? I hope not. p. 911 “The Modern Movement – A False Start” – Professor T. H. Hughes … I do still think this modern work all bunkum. I think 90 per cent. of modern work in art, music, painting and sculpture is pure rubbish. I really think it is a disease, and insidious disease, and I think at this Conference we ought to try to take some steps to do something about it and lead the modern movement on to better lines. I gave up that rude title “This Bunkum of p. 913 Modernity” … The Great War has introduced to our tastes Corbusier … Modern architecture bears to real architecture the same relation as “hot Jazz” to Weber or a rhumba to the stately minuet … The cornice goes, but the desire to mark its position remains. This is done by bricks laid to destroy the value of any bond or by bands of zig-zag lines, flutes, or perhaps the primitive spiral forms of the uneducated stone-age savage … p. 915 Discussion – Mr. Eric Jarrett: May I put in a word for the modernist? Has anybody in Glasgow hear of Mackintosh? I went to the Art School to-day and saw one of the finest modern buildings I have ever seen, and that building is 35 years old and yet we talk about tradition. I was talking to a Dutch architect a few years ago; he was showing me around the buildings of Amsterdam, and I said, “That building looks familiar,” and he said, “If you don’t know Mackintosh, we do, and Mackintosh and Lloyd Wright are our Bibles” …

pp. 920-926 The Conference Banquet Mr. Percy Thomas: …Glasgow has always been associated in my mind with two great architects, “Greek” Thomson and Mackintosh. I wonder whether you in Glasgow think as much of these men and are as proud of them as we are outside your city, and as people are all over the continent of Europe … I have been asking several of my friends in Glasgow whether there is any permanent record of the work of Mackintosh, and I find there is not. I do with all respect throw this out as a suggestion to the local architectural chapter that before it is too late the works of Mackintosh should be collected and published in book form … p. 926 Lieut.-Col. T.C.R. Moore, C.B.E., F.R.G.S., M.P. [Hon. A.]: … when the war was over, there was a demand for freedom of expression, which led, of course, to licence, and so we get to-day and have been getting for the last 12 or 14 years, not alone in painting, but in music, photography and even in sculpture, this jazz effect which has been a complete reversal of the type of art that existed in the days before the war. Now, that is understandable, but I feel that architects are sliding a bit into that line themselves …

pp. 932-939 The British Pavilion at the International Exhibition, Brussels Architect: Howard M. Robertson [F.], S.A.D.G.

p. 944 Review of Periodicals – 29 June 1935 Schools – Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo) Vol. XXIX. No. 5. May. P. 37. Illustrations of several educational buildings in Japan.

p. 965 Notes on the Construction of Cheap Furniture by David Booth, A.R.I.B.A., A.A.Dip.

pp. 972-977 A Standard of Values for Architecture To-day by Francis Lorne Paper read before the Northern Architectural Association at Newcastle-on-Tyne on 13 February 1935 p. 973 … If you want to see the most amazing collection of grandmotherly fittings parading around in modern garb, visit the Royal Academy Exhibition of British Art in Industry. You will see a lot of modern ornament plastered on industry, but the art and the industry have not fused in design any more than before … p. 977 Those of us who have grown up in architecture in this country, who have had also the advantages of working abroad, and who have kept our eyes and our minds open for ideas and influences that come in from every quarter of the world to-day, artistic, business and social, realise that we must work henceforth more for the service of society, and not so much for ourselves and our individual client … Our responsibilities are enormous, they are toward art and toward functional things, too – design, plan, conveniences, money and time, not to speak of the ever-present public authority. But over and above all of them our real job is to steam-roll ugliness, to search for order and beauty in every department of life, and having found them, to spread them as far over and as far into society, to re-make society, in fact, as much as it is possible for us to do in our day.

pp. 978-984 The Conference Visits and Tours Visit A – Tour round Glasgow by John Begg [F.] … Next to getting a coup d’oeil of Glasgow perhaps the chief interest of the drive lay in the opportunity to see something of the work of the two men whose names, above those of all others in local architecture are of world-wide importance, “Greek” Thomson and C.R. Mackintosh, those two pioneers of the “Modern Movement” by the side of whose names there is hardly more than one British name to be set, that of Philip Webb … Poor Charles Mackintosh! The Art School is almost the sole example of his amazing genius that we could be shown. But there it stands, eloquent with the message that was to ring through the continent of Europe from Holland to Vienna. One can see from it what he owed to his predecessor Thomson, and what our younger spirits of to-day owe to him, at long range in space if not in time …

pp.1006-1007 Review of Periodicals – 13 July 1935 Exhibitions – Architectural Review. Vol. LXXVIII. July. P.1 Brussels Exhibition. A vigorous and well illustrated critical appreciation of the Exhibition by John Gloag. Recreation Buildings – Architect and Building News. Vol. CXLII. No. 3471. 28 June. The Architecture of Pleasure. Illustrations of J. Emberton’s Blackpool Pleasure beach buildings. Domestic – Architect and Building News. Vol. CXLII. No. 3469. 14 June. P. 315. One storey house at Churt for Mr. Lloyd George (Chitty and Tecton [AA.]). Furniture – Architectural Record. Vol. LXXVII. No. 5. May. P. 304. Furniture and domestic equipment. Illustrations of a number of good modern pieces, including chairs designed by Marcel Breuer, which won prize as best aluminium chairs in the world. Town Planning – American Architect. Vol. CXLVI. No. 2633. May. P. 55. Broadacre City. Frank Lloyd Wright’s model of an ideal community group. The plan for a tract of 4 square miles provides facilities for 1,400 families averaging over five persons per family. It is notable that he has designed for houses and not skyscraper tenements.

p. 1008 Correspondence – The Glasgow Conference and Modern Architecture Response from Raymond McGrath to comments made by Professor T. Harold Hughes. … So much for Glasgow. A breathless telegram arrived as the discussions were ending. “Congratulations on your progress.” Progress! Was there ever an age and an art in which the real progress was so obscured by petty issues? …

R.I.B.A. Journal Volume 43 : November 1935 – October 1936 pp. 16-19 A Furniture Shop – Architect: G. A. Jellicoe, A.A. Dip. [A.] The London showroom of Messrs. Gordon Russell, Ltd.

pp. 23-24 Arts and Crafts and Modern Needs The Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society’s 16th Exhibition, Dorland House[sic.], Piccadilly. When the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society held their last show, in 1932, at Burlington House, it was still possible to talk of the useful arts without in the same breath mentioning industry and yet not seem out of date. Since then our excitement, hysteria almost, over Art and Industry has become so great that no body of craftsmen or artists could be expected to have escaped untouched …

p. 34 Accessions to the Library – 1935-1936 – I. Architecture - Kishida (Hideto) Japanese architecture. (Tourist Library: 7.) Tokyo: Maruzen. 1935. Building Types (Civil) – Le Corbusier, pseud. Aircraft. (The New Vision series, I.) Lond: The Studio. 1935.

pp. 54-56 Journal – 23 November 1935 The Exhibition of Chinese Art The exhibition of Chinese Art opens at the Royal Academy on Thursday next, 28 November. This will be the fifth of the great exhibitions of foreign art which the Royal Academy has offered the British people … Architects are, fortunately, in no danger now of seizing on the details of foreign art as the basis of a revivalist style, as was done by Sir William Chambers and the furniture designers of the eighteenth century, nor are our painters now inclined to attempt more personal assimilation of such as Whistler or Conder.

p. 77 Early Chinese Palaces and Temples. By Arnold Silcock, F.R.I.B.A. Reprinted from the October number of the Asiatic Review, together with extracts from Mr. Silcock’s recently published book An Introduction to Chinese Art (Oxford University Press).

pp. 88-92 The Domestic uses of Electricity The Demonstration House Built at Stoke Bishop, Bristol, by the Electrical Association for Women. Architect: Adrian E. Powell [A.] … The site is a typical suburban plot of 45 feet frontage and 142 feet depth … The living room in Mr. Powell’s plan can obtain sunshine throughout the day except for a brief period. As built, the two rooms are separated by a curtain, but the plan would allow of any type of partition or doors if required …

pp. 106-107 Allied Societies Hampshire and Isle of Wight Architectural Association … on 25 October, Lieut.-Colonel R. F. Gutteridge, T.D. [F.] delivered his Presidential Address … A new outlook, he said, followed the War, and he found it difficult to express any views on so-called Modernism … What is Modernism? In his view the great test of architecture of any era was whether it aptly fitted into its surroundings, and its use. There was no question of style, for they all knew and loved buildings in all styles. That, he thought, was the Modernist’s aim … Mr. H. S. Sawyer [F.] (Winchester), continuing the discussion, said that he was particularly interested in the President’s remarks about Modernism because he thought that was perhaps the most exciting thing going on …

p. 144 The International Exhibition of Chinese Art Burlington House, 1935. By Arnold Silcock, F.R.I.B.A. … In such a unique collection it is impossible to mention the outstanding exhibits because all are of an extraordinarily high standard. There are over 800 pieces from the Imperial collection, once housed in the Forbidden City, Peking, but now a part of the National collection of China, and generously lent by the Chinese Government … The only improvement, and one which is unfortunately unattainable, would be the exclusion of 50 per cent. of the crowd in galleries so transformed that “every prospect pleases and only man is vile!”

p. 154 Accessions to the Library – 7 December 1935 Domestic – Bertram (Anthony), The House a machine for living in. Illustrated by A. G. Wise. Lond: A. & C. Black. 1935. Allied Arts and Archaeology – Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society. Catalogue of the sixteenth exhibition. pam. 6” Lond. 1935.

p. 176 Editorial – 21 December 1935 Chinese Art and Western Understanding … in The Architect and Building News some weeks ago it was said: “… Chinese art is not always easy to accept at once, but the very effort we make in trying to coil our minds into the right attitude is infinitely refreshing and helps to break down the accretion of petty prejudice which constantly encrusts the intellect.”

pp. 191-192 Posters for the R.I.B.A. Exhibition of Everyday Things A Criticism of the Designs by John Gloag … Many of the competitors seemed to think that everyday life is spent entirely in the kitchen. This obsession with the apparatus of cooking gave too much prominence to mere hardware, and however graceful and exquisite a kettle or a tap may be to a pukka functionalist, such concentration on the bleaker forms of utility is apt to leave the general public cold …

pp. 194-195 House at Perton, Staffs Architects: Lavender & Twentyman [F. & A.] … Requirements of the owner were that the flat main roof should be of easy access and that the principal bedroom should have a sleeping balcony …

pp. 201-202 Reviews - Chinese Art by F. A, Walker [F.] Introduction to Chinese Art, by Arnold Silcock. Oxford University Press. London, Milford. 1935. … I who have lived in China for a number of years, and, as a consequence, know the Oriental mind, realise what great difficulties confronted Mr. Silcock in his research work … p. 202 Building for People by A.C.H.R. The House: A Machine for Living In, by Anthony Bertram. London: Black, 1935. This is a short book written for the general public, the sort of people who often build or buy by instalments their own homes … It is perhaps an over-simple view of history that is presented, but the argument is one that should appeal to English love of precedent and is a good weapon against the lingering belief that modern architecture is in some way opposed to tradition and that revivalism is in accordance with tradition … After nearly two decades of the architectural movement in Europe large sections of the English public are either oblivious of it or misunderstand it …

pp. 225-241 Modern Building in Timber. By R. Furneaux Jordan, A.R.I.B.A., A.A. Dip. p. 226 … To the architect it is quite unnecessary to point out that timber buildings have in the past ranked with the highest forms of building … The great houses and palaces of Japan (p. 240) are less well known, but are worth mentioning because they show that timber construction is to be found under all climatic conditions provided the material itself is available … One of the most impressive facts about timber on the structural side is its adaptability to modern methods of planning; the wide spans and the flexible plan forms of the modern house might well have been evoked for a timber style rather than for steel or concrete. Illustrations: The “Rin-untei” Pavilion in the garden of the Emperor’s Shugakuin Palace, Kyôto, built 1653. The “Rinshukaku” Pavilion built in 1587 as part of the Juraku Palace, Yokohama. Reception Room of a house in Tokyo, built 1928. p. 229 … How “concrete-like” are the proportions of the openings in the mediaeval Japanese house which we illustrate, and in the other modern houses. p. 238 … The possibilities latent in the timber plan were fully realised by the Japanese centuries ago. The material available, the need, in an earthquake country, for a light form of construction and an inborn sense of good proportion all contributed to the planning of buildings such as the Katsura Palace at Kyôto (1589-1643). This palace (see page 240) is typical of the larger Japanese houses of sixteenth and succeeding centuries. Its plan is astonishingly modern in many respects and shows a freedom and flexibility which would only be possible in a very light form of construction. It seems to have realised some of those qualities which have been striven for by Frank Lloyd Wright and by Corbusier, and it shows that the idea of arranging a series of apartments, each well proportioned and well lit for its purpose, in convenient relationship to each other, was an idea which was fully developed in the Far East many centuries ago. The paper and fibre-covered partitions, so similar in appearance to plywood, and the long proportions of wide-spanned openings as well as the general simplicity of treatment, all help to give a very modern aspect to the interior. p. 240 Plan of the Emperor’s Katsura Palace at Kyôto, 1589-1643.

pp. 310-311 Review of Periodicals – 18 January 1936 Libraries – Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo). Vol. XXIX. No. 11. November. Tiba Library, Tiba City, by J. Watanabe. A medium sized public library. Hospitals, etc. – Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo). Vol. XXIX, No. 12. December. Saisekai Prefectural Hospital, Osaka, by Y. Nakamura; also the Osaka Dental College Hospital. Domestic – Architectural Review. Vol. LXXIX. January. P. 25. House at Chipperfield, Bucks. An interesting small modern house in brick and timber; also houses at Wimbledon and Bagshot by E. Maxwell Fry [A.] Architects’ Journal. Vol. LXXXIII. No. 2137. 2 January. P. 9. House at Chalfont St. Giles, Bucks, by Mendelsohn and Chermayeff [F.]; also flats at Uxbridge Road, Ealing, by Ernest Schaufelberg, and at Hall Green, Birmingham, by F.W.B. Yorke. Builder. Vol. CL. No. 4849. P. 83 Featuring flats in London and Hove. Construction – Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo). Vol. XXIX. No. 11. November. P. 13. The execution of anti-earthquake construction, by Y. Sekine. Illustrated article.

p. 328 Editorial – 8 February 1936 The Exhibition of Everyday Things is to be opened at 3 p.m. on Wednesday, 19 February … The Committee’s chief object has been to show that good design can be obtained in inexpensive mass-produced objects for household and similar use …

pp. 372-375 Circus House, Gt. Titchfield St., London W.1 Architect: H. Courtenay Constantine

pp. 392-393 Editorial – 22 February 1936 Everyday Things – It is part of the common merging of taste which is one of the happiest signs of life to-day. The rich man is not required to have an entirely different outlook of art and life to the poor man. The poor man’s gas-cooker must work just as much as the rich man’s, and if it is designed well will work well and look right; beer mugs can be as lovely as wine-glasses …

pp. 416-422 “Everyday Things” The R.I.B.A. Exhibition The Exhibition, which is the principal one of the year organised by the Exhibition Sub-Committee has three aims … (1) To show the public that inexpensive mass-produced objects for household and similar use can be of good design as well as efficient. (2) To show that the minor fittings, equipment and furnishing of buildings are important factors in everyday life. (3) To show that production by machine processes of such objects for the community is an important field of study for designers …The Exhibition inevitably reveals the architect in his capacity as selector. The things shown are of kinds which the architect normally selects both for his own and for his clients’ houses. It also, in some cases, shows him as actual designer, either as a practising architect occasionally designing for industry, or as an architect-trained man or woman working solely for the trade … Section Organisers and their collaborators … E. Maxwell Fry … John Gloag … Raymond McGrath …

pp. 427-430 Book Reviews – Modern Housing – A Remarkable Survey Modern Housing, By Catherine Bauer. London. 1935 Reviewed by Felix Goldsmith [A.] … The subject is full of contentious matter, and we have to thank Miss Bauer that she deals adequately, but concisely, with such time-honoured arguments as “high buildings v. low,” and “can architecture be truly functional” … A Philosophy of Aesthetic Bridge Design by Ian G. Macdonald Review by Maxwell Ayrton [A.] … Much of the aesthetic shop window is here displayed at a glance, into which it would be well if some of our modernists would peep, when they would see that functionalism has been given its proper and stable position as an indispensable background instead of regarding it as some sort of mechanical toy nodding its head with importance in the front of the shop window … Industrial Architecture edited by C.G. Holme. London: The Studio Reviewed by C.A. Minoprio [A.] … The Studio, Ltd., have now produced a book of plates showing a selection of the best examples of the industrial architecture of to-day. The book is intended to be of assistance to designers, builders and industrialists. It consists chiefly of photographs of industrial buildings in all parts of the world, with an introduction of some twelve pages by Mr. L. H. Bucknell, F.R.I.B.A., which forms the text of the book …

p. 433 Review of Periodicals – 20 February 1936 Domestic and Housing – Architectural Review. Vol. LXXIX. January. P. 5. “Highpoint,” flats at Highgate, by Lubetkin and Tecton. One of the most interesting modern concrete flat schemes in England, illustrated and described in articles by Le Corbusier and J. M. Richards [A.] General – Journal of the Royal Society of Arts. Vol. LXXXIV. No. 4339. 17 January. P. 247. Post-war tendencies in German art schools, by Dr. Nikolaus Pevsner. A remarkably interesting paper dealing with present-day German art training and ideals, and the methods that preceded the Nazi regime’s changes; includes a generous tribute to the work of Walter Gropius and a statement of Nazi opinion about the Bauhaus.

p. 437 Accessions to the Library – 22 February 1936 Allied Arts and Archaeology Fry (Roger) and others, Chinese Art. An introductory handbook, etc. (New ed. of Burlington Magazine, Monograph I, Chinese Art. 1935) Silcock (Arnold) Introduction to Chinese art. Oxford. 1935

p. 455 Editorial – 7 March 1936 Everyday Things … During the first two weeks people have been coming to the Exhibition at about the rate of a thousand a day … the quality of the exhibition … has met with well-deserved approval from people who have been impressed, perhaps for the first time, with what we suppose can be considered the essentially architectural qualities of arrangement and order in a show of this kind …

pp. 457-466 Sculpture by Frank Dobson A paper read before the R.I.B.A. on Monday, 24 February 1936 The President, Mr. Percy E. Thomas, O.B.E., in the Chair. … Before I finish, as I am talking to the Royal Institute of British Architects, I feel I ought to say something about sculpture in relation to architecture … Sculpture which has anything to do with architecture must primarily be considered as an embellishment … I think that architects are not sufficiently aware of the possibilities of decoration there are in much modern and purely abstract sculpture. It seems to me that here is a new form of ornament which is much more in keeping with modern architecture than the re-hash of Greek and Renaissance ornament with which so many modern buildings are deformed … [illustrations of model of statue for the Terrace of Bexhill Pavilion]

pp. 477-480 The Opening of the Exhibition of Everyday Things by the Right. Hon. The Earl of Bessborough Acceptances for the Private View – General … Miss Elizabeth Denby … Mr. John Gloag, Dr. and Mrs. Walter Gropius …Mr. & Mrs. J. Craven Pritchard … pp. 481-482 “Everyday Things” A Review of the Character and Effect of the R.I.B.A. Exhibition by John Gloag … the 1925 Paris Exhibition, which muddled most people’s ideas about design and modernity …

pp. 483-486 A House at Chipperfield Common, Buckinghamshire Architect: E. Maxwell Fry, B. Arch [A.]

p. 494 Accessions to the Library – 7 March 1936 Domestic – Orui (N.) and Toba (M.) Castles in Japan. (Tourist Library, 9) Tokyo. 1935 Allied Arts and Archaeology – R.I.B.A. “Everyday things” 1936. Catalogue to the exhibition arranged by the Royal Institute of British Architects.

p. 527- 533 The Hongkong and Shanghai Bank, Hongkong. Architects: Palmer and Turner

p. 543 Accessions to the Library – 1935-1936-V – 21 March 1936 Conder (Josiah) The Theory of Japanese flower arrangements. [Reprint of paper 1889 with new plates.] Kobe & London 1935

pp. 546-548 Public Lectures at the Exhibition of Everyday Things “The Educational Aspects of Design” given by Mr. Frank Pick on Wednesday 26 February at 6 p.m. Mr. R.A. Duncan was in the chair. ‘Now if we are to have some ornament, some sense of humour, some novelty, some vogue, we still do not escape from those primary elements of good design which must find fitting expression. Fitness of purpose still remains … Modernism has never pulled itself together. There is no consistent body of thought or doctrine enshrined in the things it has given us …” “Design in Everyday Things” given by Sir Eric Maclagan, Director of the Victoria and Albert Museum on Tuesday 10 March. Mr. J. Murray Easton in the chair. … At the moment there was a reaction from ornament towards simplicity. It was impossible in speaking about any subject connected with industrial art to over-estimate the debt which we owed to William Morris …

p. 548 The Fourth Informal General Meeting – The place of the architect in the community

p. 549-550 The Northern Architectural Students’ Association Third Congress was held at the School of Architecture, Armstrong College, Newcastle, on 28 and 29 February … At 6 p.m. Professor Walter Gropius read a paper on “Modern International Architecture” in which he comprehensively traced the origin and the development of modern work in a brilliant and inspiring way. Over 250 people attended this meeting. The first day’s proceedings closed with a supper, at which Professor Gropius was the principal guest …

p. 564 Editorial – 4 April 1936 The Liverpool School Exhibition – On Monday last Professor Gropius opened an exhibition at the Building Centre of work by past and present Liverpool University School Students … Professor Gropius’s address was a brilliant and constructive survey of the place of architecture and architectural education in the modern world. We wish we could find room to publish it here, but probably it will appear in full elsewhere so that members may have an opportunity of relating Professor Gropius’s many ideas and his pregnant philosophies to the papers and discussion on architectural education published in this Journal … “Things to Come” – We believe that the R.I.B.A. building appears in Wells’ “Things to Come” – a background example of what architecture was in the degenerate nineteen-thirties … A more cryptic reference to the R.I.B.A. inspired by the film, appeared in a lively criticism by Alastair Cooke in The Listener …

pp. 580-582 The Place of the Architect in the Community by Charles Marriott … But by now we are above the ground floor, and concerned with elevations. Here, again, there is an entanglement for the architect in his pursuit of order, proportion and beauty in the social fabric, and I can best call it the descriptive tradition. It will not have escaped your notice that a good many modern buildings which subscribe to the fundamentals of architecture; order, proportion and formal – or at any rate geometrical – beauty, the Highpoint flats, for example, are hotly opposed not only by the public, but by older architects …

p. 583 Some Aerodrome Buildings – Architect: Graham Dawbarn

pp. 595-599 Radiant City and Garden Suburb – Corbusier’s Ville Radieuse Reviewed by Godfrey Samuel [A.] … When Wells broadcast an appeal for prophetic opinions, in 1932, The Listener invited Le Corbusier, amongst others, to reply. He did so, and pointed out very clearly that the things were here, it was only the shapes that were to come. (The Mayor of Algiers had just told him that his now famous new plan for the town would be very welcome in a hundred years’ time.) … But the value of this book lies in its general doctrine and in the superbly sane approach behind that doctrine. It may have in a touch of what Frank Lloyd Wright calls the Café Philosopher … An English translation should be considered, less for the sake of architectural students, who will devour it anyway, than for those members of our local town-planning authorities who are deterred by the French, for Le Corbusier has been too long considered merely a stimulant for the schools, or at best a private inspiration to some of our moderns.

pp. 599-601 Book Reviews – The Present and Hope of Things to Come The Good News Days by Marjorie and C.H.B. Quennell. London. 1936 Reviewed by H. C. Hughes [F.] … If intelligent people would all go back to living in flats and writing convincingly about their delights, in time (wasn’t it 30 years an eminent statesman gave lately as the time for the spread of an idea?) ribbon developments might end … The Studio Year Book – Decorative Art: 31st Annual Issue of the Studio Year Book. Edited by C.G. Holme. London. 1936 … On the more general question of what form of design is characteristic of modern architecture, the Studio is in little doubt if we judge from the pictures chosen. Flat roof, light coloured walls, sometimes a box-y form, large windows, and a general open air-ness – these are obvious characteristics; and all the buildings and most of the furniture and equipment represent the modern synthesis of construction and expression which is the characteristic of their work of which modern architects have most reason to be proud … Modern Gardens – When I Make a Garden by Ralph Hancock. London This is a collection of about one hundred and twenty good photographs of recent gardens mostly in England or America, but also including examples from the continent. They represent much of the best in modern garden design …

pp. 606-607 Correspondence – Architectural Education

pp. 621-628 The Royal Gold Medal Presentation to Mr. Charles Henry Holden [F.] Vice-President at the R.I.B.A. on Monday 6 April 1936

pp. 672-673 Correspondence – Architectural Education

pp. 716-717 Correspondence – Architectural Education

p. 721 Book Reviews – Colour Design Colour Designs for Modern Interiors. 80 designs in colour. Julius Hoffman, Stuttgart, re-issued London 1935 – reviewed by R.E. … The preface states that in the new architecture “we must avoid anything glaring or gaudy, and that only the smaller objects should be intensively coloured, that the walls should be in light pale shades with only a slight pattern of a kind that will gain, not lose, by the reflection of the sunny world outside.”

The Charm of the Timber House, with an Introduction by S.P.B. Mais … London 1936 … illustrate some old and new timber houses in England and the U.S.A.

p. 724 Review of Periodicals – 9 May 1936 Domestic – Architect and Building News. Vol. CXLVI. No. 3513. 17 April. P. 69 & Architects’ Journal. Vol. LXXXIII. No. 2154. 30 April. P. 659. Concrete house in Sussex by Connell, Ward and Lucas. Well described, with some technical details. An interesting example of monolithic concrete construction. Town Planning – Architecture d’Aujourdhui. Vol. VII. No. 3. March. P. 38. Algiers. Town planning, including a scheme for the application of Corbusier’s ideas and Corbusier’s scheme for Nemours. American Architect. Vol. CXLVIII. No. 2643. March. P. 17. Le Corbusier on America’s urban planning problem.

pp. 725-726 Accessions to the Library – 1935-1936 – VII – 9 May 1936 Architecture – Gropius (Walter) Architects in the making. An exhibition by the Liverpool School of Architecture … Opening address History – Glasgow: McLellan Galleries – Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh. Memorial exhibition. Glasgow 1933 Building Types (Civil) – Kitao (H.) New style in Chashitsu (tea-cult house). Kanda, Tokyo. Decorative Art. The Studio Year book. C.G. Holme editor.

p. 740 The Dinner to Mr. Howard Robertson Held in honour of Mr. Howard Robertson who is relinquishing his post as Director of Education of the A.A. School. “Nobody ever leaves the A.A.”

pp. 768-769 Obituaries C. Howard Walker [Hon. Corr. Member] – by Dr. Thomas Adams … My last view of him in action was in a brief combat of wits with Frank Lloyd Wright. Wright was giving a lecture in Boston, and claiming for “Wrightism” something that was opposed to both modernism and classicism. Walker resented Wright’s claim to originality, and questioned the artistic quality of designs that had been shown, but the occasion was not one to permit him to score …

Seiichiro Chujo [Hon. A.] We regret to record the death of Mr. Seiichiro Chujo on 30 January. Mr. Chujo has been an Honorary Associate of the Institute since 1926.

p. 770 Correspondence – Architectural Education Response from Percy J. Waldram … My letter made no suggestion of aridity in any architectural movement, modern or otherwise, but merely mentioned the arid period which invariably characterises the degeneration of any style into slavish copying …

p. 773 The Annual Elections – New Nominations to council and standing committees – The following nominations have been made by members in accordance with Bye-laws 35 and 56:- Chermayeff, Serge [F.]: Nominated by Professor Lionel B. Budden, Professor R. A. Cordingley, Joseph Emberton, Edward Maufe, Professor C.H. Reilly, Thom. T. Tait, Fellows; E. Maxwell Fry, Professor W. G. Holford, Raymond McGrath, Basil Ward, L.W. Thornton White, Associates.

p. 788 Trend – A new half-crown magazine with the significant name: Trend has recently appeared, sponsored by the Design and Industries Association, whose official journal it is … The first number has articles on pottery, refrigeration, zip fasteners, furniture, packaging and much else …

pp. 813-817 Miss Blanc-White – convenor of the Students’ Sub-committee of the Junior Members’ Committee – Architectural Education – A Report of the Informal Meeting held at the R.I.B.A. on Tuesday, 19 May 1936. Mr. John Summerson [A.] in the Chair.

p. 829 Everyday Things at Bristol The Opening of the Exhibition of Everyday Things at the Royal West of England Academy, Bristol on 18 May 1936.

pp. 833-834 Correspondence – Education and Civic Architecture Letter from A. Trystan Edwards [F.] – 100 New Towns Association … Having determined the general shape of the building by considering its relationship to the town as a whole, within that shape we plan the rooms. Thus the modernist doctrine of planning the building “from the inside outwards” is thoroughly perverse. If there is to be such a thing as civic manners we must design “from the outside inwards” … buildings can no more afford to be completely naked than can human beings … In entering some of our modernist buildings I have the same kind of resentment as I should feel if I were arrested by a policeman in plain clothes … It is the complete failure to acknowledge civic values which renders the Le Corbusier skyscraper proposals so completely unacceptable …

p. 844 Editorial – 27 June 1936 Everyday Things – A Radio Talk

pp. 867-871 British Regional Broadcasting Stations

p. 875 Book Reviews – A New Short History of Architecture A Key to English Architecture by T.D. Atkinson. London. 1936. … Publishers do not, presumably, lack common sense in their interpretation of what the public wants, so that we can conclude that they do now want a key to the history of English architecture at a time when other evidence might be taken to show that the general interest in factual history is dying down …

p. 878 Review of Periodicals – 27 June 1936 Schools and Universities – Kentikie[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo). Vol. XXX. No. 4. April. P. 1. Nippon Middle School, Tokyo. A large State school on modern European lines, by K. Imai. Shops – Architectural Review. Vol. LXXIX. No. 475. June. P. 269. Illustrations of three recent London shops. Peter Jones, Sloane Square, by Slater and Moberly [FF.] with C.H. Reilly [F.] and W. Crabtree [A.]; Simpsons, Piccadilly, by J. Emberton [F.], and shop at Golders Green by E. Goldfinger with R. Jensen.

p. 881 Accessions to the Library – 1935-1936 – IX – 27 June 1936 Boerschmann (Ernst) Picturesque China. Architecture and landscape. Louis Hamilton. Trans (Orbis Terrarum) New York: Brentano [1925].

pp. 885-886 Obituary – Dame Henrietta Barnett O.B.E. A Memoir by Sir Raymond Unwin P.P.R.I.B.A. conceived and carried to success the Hampstead Garden Suburb project

pp. 901-903 The Architecture of To-morrow by G. A. Jellicoe, A.R.I.B.A. A paper read at the inaugural meeting [illustration of Bexhill Pavilion] … If we examine how building may become architecture we find that there are two sources of inspiration. There is the question “What will be the new relation to Mankind?” and afterwards, “What will be the new relation to Landscape?” … Of modern buildings in this country probably the de la Warr pavilion at Bexhill is the most expressive … The relation to landscape is one in which I am particularly interested, and I think it is safe to say that a new landscape is being formed … Discussion – Mr. H.M. Fletcher: … Le Corbusier is all for law and order, but is law and order interpreted by a professor of logic, and when Mr. Jellicoe says that Le Corbusier’s ideas are the nearest approach to the Acropolis we must surely protest … Mr. P. J. Waldram: … I appreciate modern design, but to my ideas the proportions of many of the buildings of to-day are too cold. There does not seem to me to be enough consideration for light and shade in grouping … The thing that matters really is that a building should be suitable for the country it is built in; that it should fit its surroundings. I do hope that the modern school are going to give a little more light and shade, and that they will clothe their bare walls a little more …

pp. 913-917 The Conference Banquet held on Thursday, 25 June, on the Royal Steam Packet Company’s liner Asturias, lying in Southampton docks. pp. 916-917 The Bishop of Winchester: … Then there is the note of simplicity. I think that is the most remarkable feature of the architecture of our time. Stress is laid on line and mass and simplicity, and most modern architecture is impressive on that account. Attention is being paid, too, to suitability. I mean that buildings are being put in the right places. A building which might be thoroughly suitable in a town could be an eyesore in the countryside … Where you get a building that has been erected for use you get a rather striking beauty, as I think you can do, especially in certain lights, in the case of the great power station at Battersea … We have a splendid heritage of building in the past; we must not only preserve that heritage but see that we hand down a new heritage, bearing the impress of our own time, having strength and beauty, dignity and simplicity …

p. 936 The Exhibition of Everyday Things at Liverpool At the opening on Saturday, 4 July, Lady Rutherford said that the Exhibition revealed that it was possible now to obtain beautiful things as cheaply as things which had no beauty.

pp. 939-940 Book Reviews – The Death of the Squire The Rule of Taste by John Steegmann. London 1936 Reviewed by Dudley Harbron … In The Rule of Taste Mr. Steegmann raises a great many interesting issues which it is impossible to discuss here – as the inferiority complex of the English, our hereditary romanticism and the present quality of architecture. He brings to mind many more that he does not consider.

p. 942 Review of Periodicals – 18 July 1936 Domestic and Housing - A number of articles on flats Construction – Architectural Review. Vol. LXXX. No. 476. July. P. 7. The Seaside: review of seaside planning, building and amenities.

Accessions to the Library – 1935-1936 – X – 18 July 1936 Japan Times & Mail, publ. Architectural Japan. Old : new. Hibiya Tokyo. 1936

p. 960 Editorial – 8 August 1936 The R.I.B.A. Film – The picture at the foot of this page is a “still” from the Gaumont-British film of the R.I.B.A. which has been prepared under the auspices of the Film Sub-Committee of the R.I.B.A. Public Relations Committee. It shows the President seated in the debonair surroundings of the Gaumont-British sound-recording studio, about to start his running commentary on the pictures which follow the Portland Place building …

pp. 975-984 The Architect and Housing by the Speculative Builder VI Some Estates in Devon - Architect: Louis de Soissons [F.] S.A.D.G. Builder: Staverton Builders, Ltd. – associated company of Dartington Hall Ltd.

pp.1042-1044 Coram’s Fields, Guilford Street, London, W.C.1.

pp.1045-1046 Book Reviews Small Houses – Houses for Moderate Means by Randall Phillips. London: Country Life 1936 Industrial Symbols – Symbols by Kenneth Brady. Manchester 1936 The Cost of Intensive Development – The Housing Problem: How planned distribution may prevent overcrowding by Sir Raymond Unwin. Modern Alphabets – Lettering: A Handbook of Modern Alphabets by Percy J. Smith. London 1936 … Mr. Percy Smith is one of the experts whose work is well known in England now. Among his clients have been the L.C.C., the B.B.C., the Underground Railways and the R.I.B.A. …

pp.1046-1047 Review of Periodicals – 5 September 1936 Museums and Exhibitions – Architectural Review. Vol. LXXX. 1936. August. Exhibition stand at Royal Agricultural Show, Bristol, for furniture manufacturer, by Marcel Breuer and F.R.S. Yorke [A.] Commercial – Architectural Record. Vol. LXXX. No. 2. 1936. August. Article on stores and other commercial buildings; many useful plans and photographs. Architects’ Journal. Vol. LXXXIV. No. 2171. 1936. 27 August. Film studios at Shepperton by Connell, Ward & Lucas. An analysis of the principles governing the design, with some very useful illustrations. Domestic – Architects’ Journal. Vol. LXXXIV. 13 August. P. 210. Architects’ Journal. Vol. LXXXIV. No. 2170. 1936. 20 August. Architectural Review. Vol. LXXX. 1936. August. P. 55. House, Frognal Way, Hampstead, By E. Maxwell Fry [A.] the most important concrete dwelling house yet built in London. Architects’ Journal. Vol. LXXXIV. 1936. 6 August. P. 175 Architect and Building News. Vol. CXLVII. 1936. 7 August. P. 167. Houses at Haywards Heath by Tecton … The Architectural Forum. Vol. LXV. No. 2. 1936. August. A review of Britain’s building boom. Also a splendid analysis on the planning of domestic units.

p. 1049 Accessions to the Library – 3 September 1936 Patmore (Derek) Modern furnishings and decoration. Lond: The Studio 1936.

p. 1060 Editorial – 17 October 1936 The Building Exhibition … There was one large part of the show where able exhibition was seen at its best. In the New Homes for Old Exhibition in the gallery the Housing Centre, the M.A.R.S. group and A.T.O. had a first-rate theme and presented it as near faultlessly as could be …

pp.1078-1082 No. 13 Downshire Hill, Hampstead, N.W.3. Architects: M. J. H. Bunney, M.A. (Oxon.), A.A. Dip., [A.] Charlotte Bunney, A.A. Dip. [A.] … The living room is fitted with what may be described as units of movable built-in furniture …

p. 1089 The Exhibition of Everyday Things at Manchester … In his speech Mr. Goodhart-Rendel explained that the Exhibition aimed at being a sort of shopping guide to those who wished to buy simple, cheap things of agreeable design … “I believe,” he said, “that none of the stupid, gaudy, misshapen, clumsy things which are sold in the shops is bought for its qualities, but for something else which might exist just as well in objects which have not got these faults …

pp.1092-1094 Review of Periodicals – 17 October 1936 Exhibitions – Architect and Building News. 1936. 18 September. P. 335. British Pavilion for Paris 1937 Exhibition by Oliver Hill [F.]. Transport Buildings – Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo). 1936. July. Plates p. 10. Yaizu and Wada Railway Stations, Japan. General, Aesthetics and Biography – Architectural Record (New York). 1936. September. P. 181. The Architect in a Modern World. Article by R.L. Duffus, analysing opinions of many leaders of architectural thought, sociologists, etc. An interesting contribution to architectural sociology and education. Also article on apprenticeship training for the architect by Frank Lloyd Wright.

pp.1094-1095 Accessions to the Library – 1935-1936 – XII – 17 October 1936 History – Harada (Jiro) The Lesson of Japanese architecture. C.G. Holme, ed. Lond.: The Studio. 1936 Building Types (civil) – Parsons (W.M.T.) Shops and shop fronts. (Thesis for Final Examination, July.) (domestic) – Jordan (R.F.) The Charm of the timber house. London. 1936

p. 1100 Obituary – Edward Hudson – founder of Country Life

R.I.B.A. Journal Volume 44 : November 1936 – October 1937 pp. 11-13 Presentation of the R.I.B.A. Bronze Medal and Diploma, 1935 to Mr. R. H. Uren … Some may say that 1935 must have been a bad year for London architecture. Possibly it was! The modernists may say “Retrograde! Antique!” and the traditionalists may say something very much worse …

pp. 23-30 The Architect and Housing by the Speculative Builder – Article VII – The Hanger Hill Estate, Park Royal, London Architects: Herbert A. Welch and Felix J. Lander [FF.] Builders: Haymills, Ltd.

p. 34 Correspondence – 7 November 1936 The R.IB.A. Film – comments from A.F. Russell - reply from the Public Relations Committee Architecture and Archaeology – letter from Charles F. Annesley Voysey … to mix up the architectural expressions of different nations or allow any foreign style to contaminate our own is like blending two different national languages, as too often happens in our modern literature. The architecture of every country in its purity has always been the accurate history of the moral, spiritual and material condition of the time and country in which it is found. And if it is mixed with the feelings of other nations it is false history. And all falsehood is poisonous.

p. 38 Review of Periodicals – 7 November 1936 Exhibition Buildings – Construction Moderne (Paris). 1936. 18 October. P. 50. Designs for pavilions in Paris Exhibition. 1937. Zoos – Nippon Architect (Tokyo). 1936. October. P. 1. Tokyo Imperial University aquarium and aquatic laboratory. Offices – Architecture U.S.S.R. 1936. October. P. 27. Office of the Commissariat of Light Industry, Moscow, by le Corbusier and P. Jeanneret, with N. J. Colli.

p. 41 Accessions to the Library – 7 November 1936 Allied Arts and Archaeology – Pevsner (Nikolaus) Pioneers of the modern movement from William Morris to Walter Gropius. London: Faber & Faber. 1936 Town and Country Planning, Gardens Gothein (M.L.) A History of garden art. W. P. Wright, ed. Trans. from German by Mrs. Archer-Hind. London. 1928 Jellicoe (G.A.) Garden decoration & ornament for smaller houses. Lond.: Country Life. 1936

pp. 61-80 Rehousing from the Slum Dweller’s Point of View by Elizabeth Denby Paper read before the R.I.B.A. on Monday, 16 November, at 8 p.m.

pp. 86-90 Showrooms for the Luton Gas Company Architect: H. Austen Hall [F.] (Whitnney, Son and Austen Hall [FF.])

p. 99 Review of Periodicals – 21 November 1936 Museums and Exhibitions – Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo). 1936. September. P. 1. Osaka Municipal Art Gallery. Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo). 1936. September. P. 6. Sinmaiko Aquarium, Japan, By G. Kume. A Well-equipped modern aquarium.

p. 112 Editorial – 5 December 1936 Architecture and the Arts – The Next Informal Meeting The Architect in relation to the Arts will be opened by Mr. L. Moholy-Nagy and Mr. Serge Chermayeff. Mr. Herbert Read will sum up … Exhibition of Everyday Things – Tour Closes at Manchester City Art Gallery

pp. 113-128 Planning and Architectural Developments at the Seaside by Wesley Dougill – Read before the R.I.B.A. on Monday, 30 November 1936 The President (Mr. Percy E. Thomas) in the Chair p. 119 … Front Facades – The tendency, I believe an inevitable one, is to increase the height of the buildings on the front. It seems a natural thing to extract the utmost value out of the unlimited open space seawards. Embassy Court, at Brighton, by Mr. Wells Coates, is the most direct evidence of the tendency. It is a multi-storey block of flats. Discussion – Dr. Alfred Cox: … the writer – not a very serious person, but someone who gives a great deal of amusement to people every week – alluded to the architecture of a favourite resort of mine as “a mixture of Early Wedding Cake and Late Water Closet.” I am afraid that description, though vulgar, is not inapt; there is evidently room for a great deal of improvement …

pp. 129-131 Slums and Housing – History, Conditions and Policy in New York City Thomas Adams, Consultant, Regional Plan of New York … The modern claim by some housing reformers in England that flats should be erected to provide housing near to work, a claim that is largely based on fallacy …

p. 144 Book Review – Houses in Japan The Lesson of Japanese Architecture by Jiro Harada. London: Studio 1936 [edited by C.G. Holme] … Japanese domestic architecture has a factual as well as a spiritual lesson for people in Western Europe: that Japan can be to the modern Englishman as Rome was to his ancestors … so we can make a livelier contact with the standardisation, variety in unity, conformity of a mode of living, connection with nature, simplicity, and, of course, usefulness to purpose of Japanese building. If this is Mr. Holme’s purpose, it is one that interprets well our needs and our achievements. Without conscious imitation, or even spiritual contacts, much modern architecture has developed in a way that shows definite affinity, in plan particularly, with Japanese work ….

p. 146 Accessions to the Library – 1936-1937 – II – 5 December 1936 Architecture – Lancaster (Osbert) Progress at Pelvis Bay. London 1936 Le Corbusier, pseud., and Jeanneret (Pierre) Le Corbusier et P- J-. Oeuve complete de 1929-1934. Zurich 1935

pp. 163-164 Editorial – 19 December 1936 Televising Architecture – Friday, 11 December 1936, should be regarded by architects as a historic date, for on it took place the first television broadcast on architecture. Seated on steel chairs before a horizontally barred window, Mr. John Gloag and Mr. Serge Chermayeff discussed “The Modern House” … Modern Art and Architecture – The Informal Meeting of Wednesday, 9 December, was in some respects one of the best there has yet been; in other respects it was disappointing, for though those who came had the privilege of listening to a series of really excellent speeches by leaders of modern art, Mr. Moholy-Nagy, Mr. Gabo and Mr. Herbert Read, the discussion which it was hoped these confessions of faith would stimulate was almost non-existent …

pp. 176-179 Hotel Modernisation by Howard Robertson An Address delivered at the Seventh Annual Conference of the Hotel and Restaurants Association on 10 October 1936 … Part of the charm of the best modern work is its sense of fragility and structural daring …

p. 191 Review of Periodicals – 19 December 1936 Domestic – Architectural Review. 1936. December Special number on the Modern English House. A chronological survey of recent English domestic architecture. Many excellent illustrations and plans classified under three headings: (a) Bricks; (b) Frames; (c) Concrete. A fully illustrated article on interior equipment. Town Flats. 1936. December. P. 130. City flats in Charterhouse Square, London, by G. Morgan and Partners.

pp. 209-219 Modern Art and Architecture – Reports of the Principal Speeches at the Informal General Meeting on Wednesday, 9 December 1936 L. Moholy-Nagy: Between 1920 and 1930, when a good deal of propaganda was being made for the new architecture, you often heard people express the opinion that neither painting nor plastic art had any place in a modern room … Herbert Read: … Modern art provides the industrial designer with analogies, not with rules and models … Art was concerned with the whole range of human experience, not only space but time as well. It was the reaction of the human mind to every form of sensuous experience and all phenomena of growth and evolution of nature and mankind, of dream and reality. It was art in this integral humanistic sense which we had to relate to modern architecture.

pp. 220-224 Flower Boxes for Windows and Balconies Compiled in collaboration with Lady Allen of Hurtwood, F.I.L.A. Broadcasting House, London. Because the boxes are so wide and deep it is only necessary to plant three times a year. The Bay trees have been in position for nearly five years. They are very large concrete retainers. Garden Architect, Lady Allen of Hurtwood. B.B.C. photo.

p. 238 Book Review – The Sea Saw It and Fled Progress at Pelvis Bay by Osbert Lancaster. London 1936 … it covers all flights of the bourgeois fancy from “modified” modern hotels to outlying housing estates where the “greatest care has been taken to avoid all suspicion of urban monotony and utmost variety of architecture has been encouraged” … Museum of Modern Art, New York – Publications The R.I.B.A. Library and Exhibitions Committee have now established relations with the New York Museum of Modern Art and publications are exchanged … The Modern Architecture Catalogue includes a foreword by Mr. A.H. Barr, Director of the Museum, outlining the principles and practices of modern architecture. Mr. Philip Johnson gives an Historical Note, and together with Mr. Henry-Russell Hitchcock, gives a short resume of the extent of modern architecture in various countries …

p. 240 Review of Periodicals – 9 January 1937 Domestic – Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo). 1936. November. No. 11. Special Japanese House Number, with many photographs illustrating ritual and other elements of the house. Architects’ Journal. 1936. 24 December. P. 869. Two Houses in Church Street, Chelsea, by Mendelsohn & Chermayeff and by Walter Gropius & E. Maxwell Fry. Architects’ Journal. 1936. 31 December. P. 906. House at Iver, Bucks, By F.R.S. Yorke [A.]. Reinforced concrete construction.

p. 241 Accessions to the Library – 1936-1937 – III – 9 January 1937 Architecture – New York: Museum of Modern Art. Modern architecture. International exhibition. 1932 R.I.B.A. [Exhibitions] British architecture of today. [Travelling exhibition.] London. 1935

p. 255 Members’ Column – Dissolution of Partnership The partnership between Erich Mendelsohn and Serge Chermayeff [F.] has been dissolved by mutual consent as from October 1936. Erich Mendelsohn will practise at 17 Berkeley Square, W.1. Serge Chermayeff will continue to practise at 173 Oxford Street, W.1, until the early spring.

pp. 261-272 Exhibition of British Architecture, 1900-1936, Royal Academy of Arts 11 January – 6 March 1937 – Professor Lionel B. Budden [F.] p. 263 … Amongst the wealth of significant drawings displayed here – the range of authorship comprises, amongst many others, Smirke, Wilkins, Barry, Elmes, Cockerell, Hardwick, Street, Burges, Gilbert Scott, Norman Shaw, Philip Webb and C.R. Mackintosh – p. 264 … are assembled various ecclesiastical designs by Pugin, Brodrick, Bodley, J.L. Pearson, Butterfield and their contemporaries, all of them interesting not the least so being a drawing belonging to a Gothic scheme for the second Liverpool Cathedral competition by C.R. Mackintosh. p. 265 … and Mr. Stanley C. Ramsey’s Winter Gardens, Margate, the last most attractively shown … But the most stimulating exhibit will be generally admitted to be Messrs. Mendelsohn and Chermayeff’s De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill. This shown by a number of excellent photographs, drawings and autograph sketches (the latter so composed on a single sheet as to give the impression of having been prepared specially for the occasion) and by incomparably the finest model in the whole exhibition. Incidentally, it may be observed that the Committee appears to have amused itself more than once in its placing of exhibits. There are some sly juxtapositions and the arrangement in the neighbourhood of the illustrations relating to the De La Warr Pavilion provides as good an instance as any. p. 266 … The work of the less literally traditional architects is represented by such examples as … Sun House, Hampstead, by Mr. E. Maxwell Fry … a House at Chalfont, St. Giles, by Messrs. Mendelsohn and Chermayeff, Working Class Flats, Chalk Farm, by Messrs. Connell, Ward and Lucas …

pp. 276-283 The Comet Hotel – Hatfield, Hertfordshire Architect: E. B. Musman, B.A. [F.]

pp. 298-299 Book Reviews – Modern Theatre Design Teatri by Bruno Moretti. Milan 1936 … One of the worst cinema exteriors of any in the world is surely the Takarayuka Theatre in Yokohama; this front exhibits the worst of modern forms. It is clumsy and inept, and except that it provides the author with an example which justifies the international scope of his collection of modern theatres there is no other reason for its inclusion. England is represented by four theatres and cinemas; the Cambridge and Shakespeare Memorial Theatres, and two cinemas by Mr. Robert Cromie – The Regal, Wimbledon, and, what is probably his best design, the Plaza, Sutton …

p. 299 Review of Periodicals – 23 January 1937 Shops and Departmental Stores – Architectural Review. 1937. January. P. 25. Shop for the sale of nursery equipment, by Erno Goldfinger and G.W. Flower

p. 302 Correspondence – Modern Art and Architecture Response from C. H. Lay [F.] … The revelations in it [report] are certainly astonishing, especially to one who helped to found the modern movement in art in pre-war days … Mr. Herbert Read tells us that there exists a play of forces between sculpture and architecture. I put the same remark in my notebook when I heard it at a lecture at the Architectural Association in 1911.

p. 306 Membership Lists – Applications for membership Election: 11 January 1937 As Licentiates – Coates: Wells, B.A., B.Sc., Ph.D.

pp. 315-316 Editorial – 6 February 1937 The Registration – The Architects Registration Bill The Airports and Airways Exhibition … will consist of several hundred photographs, models and diagrams …

p. 357 The Registration Bill – The following leading article appeared in “The Times” of Wednesday, 3 February 1937 & The Following is the Text of the Bill

p. 361 Notes – Professor Walter Gropius wishes to announce that he has accepted the offer by the Senate of Harvard University of the U.S.A. of the Chair of Architecture in the Graduate School of Design … The partnership subsisting between Professor Gropius and Maxwell Fry will continue for a further period, and will be dissolved only when Professor Gropius’ duties at Harvard University make this necessary …

p. 407 Review of Periodicals – 20 February 1937 Domestic – L’Architecture d’Aujourd’hui (Boulogne). 1937. January. P. 65. A Japanese house, by Bruno Taut. Architectural Review. 1937. February. P. 60. Architect and Building News. 1937. 5 February. P. 174 Reinforced concrete bungalows at Whipsnade, by Lubetkin and Tecton. General – Architectural Association Journal. 1937. February. P. 291. “On the Philosophy of Modernism: A Criticism.” Paper by Hope Bagenal [A.].

pp. 408-409 Accessions to the Library – 1936-1937 –IV – 20 February 1937 Architecture – Lewis (Wyndham) The Caliph’s design. Architects! Where is your vortex? London: The Egoist 1919 History – Pevsner (Nikolaus) Pioneers of the modern movement, etc. 1936 Town and Country Planning and Gardens – Kuck (L.E.) One hundred Kyoto gardens. London: Kegan Paul; Kobe: Thompson [1935 or –36]

p. 415 Allied Societies – Manchester Society Professor Gropius addressed the Society on 13 January and claimed that we were now in a position to prove conclusively that the outward form of modern architecture and design was not the whim of a few architects or artists hunger for innovation, by the inevitable consequential product of the intellectual, social and technical conditions of our age …

pp. 444-447 The Airports and Airways Exhibition

pp. 448-450 A Review of the Exhibition by Roderick Denman … The photograph of the empty Control Officer’s desk conveys the suggestion that this important individual can never sit still for any length of time. This, if not as it should be, is about how it works out in practice. Compared with so good an example of design as the B.B.C. Dramatic Control Panel, it cannot be said that the Airport Control Officer’s desk takes one’s breath away by its beauty … [although not credited in the article, the Dramatic Control Panel was designed for the BBC by Wells Coates in 1931 (Sherban Cantacuzino, Wells Coates: A Monograph, p. 33)]

pp. 456-458 Book Reviews – Pioneers of the Modern Movement. From William Morris to Walter Gropius by Nikolaus Pevsner. London. 1936 Reviewed by Raymond McGrath … Consider only the work of Le Corbusier, Mendelsohn, Markelius, Oud, Lurcat, Lloyd Wright, Neutra, Gropius, van der Rohe. If by self-expression Mr. Pevsner means an arbitrary effort at doing something different he will naturally find it absent in the work of these architects. But if he means saying what one wants to say as clearly as possible, which surely admits of whatever self-expression can possibly ask for, then he has failed to understand the work of these architects and the fact that modern architecture stands for liberation from style and façade. p. 457 Contemporary Domestic Arts Decorative Art, 1937. 32nd Annual Issue of the Studio Year Book. Edited by C.G. Holme. London: The Studio 1937 pp. 457-458 Cinemas – Modern Cinemas. Reprint from Architects’ Journal. London: Architectural Press 1936 Cinema designing hitherto has not come within the scope of the competition system. The ownership of most cinemas in England by large financial groups has resulted in the concentration of cinema designing in the hands of comparatively few architects … p. 458 The Tokyo Olympic Games General Architectural Scheme for 12th Olympiad, Tokyo, 1940. Proposed by Students of Architectural Department, Waseda University, October, 1936. Waseda 1937 This booklet illustrates designs for all the Olympic buildings on a scale similar to that adopted in Berlin, 1936, though more positively internationally modernist in style … p. 460 Review of Periodicals – 6 March 1937 Civic - Journal of the Institute of Japanese Architects (Tokyo). 1937. January. P. 127. The Imperial Diet (Parliament) Building, Tokyo. Grandiose Western planning.

p. 462 Accessions to the Library – 6 March 1937 Civil – Architects’ Journal [Special number.] Cinemas. (7 Nov.) London 1937 Tokyo: Waseda University – Architectural Department General architectural scheme for 12th Olympiad, Tokyo, 1940 Tokyo 1936 Domestic – Architectural Review [Special number.] The Modern English house. (Dec.) London 1936 Allied Arts and Archaeology – Studio, publ. Decorative art. 1937. C.G. Holme, ed. London 1937 Council for Art and Industry, Design and the designer in industry. London 1937 Barr (A.H.) junr., editor Fantastic art. Dada. Surrealism. New York: Museum of Modern Art; London: Geo. Allen & Unwin. 1936

pp. 466-467 Obituaries – Arthur J. Penty – An Appreciation by Joseph Armitage … About 1905 he and Mr. Charles Spooner joined forces as Elmdon & Co, for the design and production of furniture. In the foreword of their catalogue they said: “The qualities to be looked for in good design are not so much the enrichment of the thing, as pleasing proportion, and the fact that the thing, whatever it may be, looks, and is convenient and altogether suitable for its purpose, and for the material of which it is made” – an early recognition of the functionalists’ slogan “Fitness for Purpose” …

p. 467 Allied Societies The Birmingham and Five Counties Architectural Association The fourth general meeting of the session was held … on Friday 27 November, when the President, Mr. Alfred Hale [F.], occupied the chair and a paper entitled “Sculpture on Machine-made Buildings” was read by Mr. Eric Gill [Hon. A.] …

p. 483 The Working of the Advisory Panels System by G.H. Jack [photo: An example of unneighbourliness]

p. 513 Review of Periodicals – 20 March 1937 Museums and Exhibitions – L’Architecture (Paris). 1937. 15 February. P. 37. Further illustrations of the Paris Exhibition, 1937. Buildings and plans. Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo). 1937. January. Reviews of four Japanese furniture exhibitions.

p. 551 Modern Architecture and the Countryside The last informal general meeting on 24 March produced a lively if inconclusive discussion on modern architecture and the countryside. Mr. Maxwell Fry started off. He said that architecture, being indivisible, there could never be one architecture of the town and one of the country … Mr. W. Palmer (Secretary of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings) thought not. Modern architecture was an affront … The meeting … after excursions into the ethics of flat roofs and the architect’s function of leadership in the community proceeded to the more immediate problem of when modern architecture is good manners …

p. 563 Accessions to the Library – 10 April 1937 History – Kaufmann (Emil) Von Ledoux bis Le Corbusier. Ursprung und entwicklung der autonomen architektur. Vienna 1933 Educational – Tokyo: Waseda University. Its history, aims and regulations. Tokyo 1936 Presented by Professor S. Soshiroda, of the Architecture Department of the University.

p. 565 Correspondence – Modern Art and Architecture Comments from H. O. Weller [Hon. A.]

pp. 659-660 Editorial – 8 May 1937 Exhibitions, Modern Architecture and Thomas Harris There are several architectural exhibitions on in London now … There is not much time left in which to see the Liverpool School Exhibition which closes on 14 May. It is a vigorous, vivacious show and excellently hung. Professor Julian Huxley opened the exhibition on Friday, 30 April, modestly disclaiming his qualifications to do so, but emphatically disproving his disclaimer by the fact of his own reputation as a sociologist and a scientist and as one of the most adventurous patrons of modern architecture in England in his position as secretary of the London Zoo. Another modern architecture exhibition of a very special kind which is coming off soon is the Modern Architectural Research Group’s (Mars) Exhibition at the Burlington Galleries. This will be opened on 21 June and will demonstrate the essential character of modern design … Among the patrons of the exhibition are Lord Derby, Lord Wakefield, Lord Horder, Sir Michael Sadler and Mr. George Bernard Shaw, who is contributing the foreword to the catalogue. Mr. Goodhart-Rendel’s paper on modern French architecture was an apposite antidote to enthusiasms and prejudices for “modern” modern architecture … His delicately administrated pin-pricks in the broad flank of modern architecture … left that usually lively beast too bewildered to know which way to turn. But since the only reference to Le Corbusier was in an acid comparison with a certain Mr. Thomas Harris, unknown until the end of the meeting to anyone but the lecturer, what could the modernist say in his defence? This Mr. Harris … wrote in 1860; “ This is an age of new creations, steam power and electric communication, neither the offshoot or any former period, but entirely new revolutionising influences. So must it be in Architecture, if it is to express these changes. We must no longer grope about among the images of former ages, but must ascend to clear first principles and with strong faith chisel out for ourselves new expressions, being content with simple, and, it may be, rude achievements at the outset …”

pp. 661-676 Recent French Architecture by H. S. Goodhart-Rendel [F.] A Paper read before the R.I.B.A. on Monday, 26 April 1937 The President (Mr. Percy E. Thomas) in the Chair p. 672 … When the history comes to be written of the modern style, the style whose boastful adjective already tends to be put into inverted commas, when that style is bottled on a museum shelf beside the dustier bottles containing the pre-war Style Moderne, the Art Nouveau of 1900 the experiments of the Century Guild, the Victorian style of Mr. Thomas Harris … I think that the only thing those exhibits will be seen to have in common will be the spirit of revolt. Writers make solemn attempts nowadays to trace a common direction through all the revolting movements they happen to have heard of, with very curious results. Paxton joins hands with Mackintosh and no doubt somebody will soon find that Thomas Harris has been reincarnated in M. le Corbusier … In modern architecture we can generally be sure enough of getting modernity, but I think that in France primarily (I had almost said in France alone) can we be also sure of getting architecture. p. 674 Discussion – Mr. Howard M. Robertson: … What he [Goodhart-Rendel] has said to us is valuable in many respects. He has got through a lecture on French architecture with the mention only once of Le Corbusier – who is Swiss. He has not mentioned many of the other hardy annuals with whom in England we associate the modern movement … p. 675 Mr. H.S. Goodhart-Rendel: … Now I will come to the one point on which I was challenged: Mr. Thomas Harris. If you look in the Oxford Dictionary for the word “Victorianism.” You will find that the first time the word “Victorian” appears is in a pamphlet by Mr. Thomas Harris entitled “Victorian Architecture,” of which a copy exists in this library. It was followed by an illustrated book bearing the same title, a book we do not possess. I happen to know it, and so I can tell you about various works in which Mr. Thomas Harris exemplified his view of what Victorian architecture should be … Harris’s view was that anything which was nothing else must certainly be Victorian. In that he seems to have anticipated the popular view of modern architecture at the present day. He apparently had a much more virtuous old age, when he went Queen Anne with the times; but the works of his youth still remind us that there were other people besides Mackintosh and who might be discovered as being the true progenitors of the modern style …

p. 698 Accessions to the Library – 1936-1937 –VII – 8 May 1937 History – Raymond (Antonin) A- R-. His work in Japan 1920-1935. Pref. By Elie Faure and an article by Antonin and Noemi P. Raymond. (Title in English and Japanese.) New York: Museum of Modern Art – Modern architecture in England. [Exhibition. With articles by H.-R. Hitchcock, jr., and Catherine K. Bauer.] New York

p. 701-702 Review of Periodicals – 8 May 1937 Radio – Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo). No. 2. 1937. P. 2. Osaka central broadcasting station , by J. Watanabe. Sports – Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo). No. 3. 1937. P. 2. Torite racecourse stand.

p. 706 Obituaries – Mr. Seiichiro Chujo [Hon. A.] Mr. Seiichiro Chujo, whose death in 1936 has been recorded in the Journal, was an Honorary Associate of the Institute since 1926. He was born in 1868 and in 1898 he graduated from the Engineering College of the Tokio Imperial University and in 1904 came to England, and was at Cambridge for three years …

pp. 734-736 Architecture in the Newspapers

pp. 737-741 The Architect and Housing by the Speculative Builder – Article VIII Adaptable House Designs and Built-in Furniture – A Scheme by Tubbs, Duncan & Osburn [AA.] … Further, in considering the house as a machine for living in, the designer is limited in the provision of fixed equipment almost entirely to the kitchen and bathroom where functions are to some extent regularised … In recent years there has been a tendency in architect-designed houses to provide the majority of the equipment in the form of fixtures, having movable only those objects such as chairs, that require to be movable for convenience. The house and its furniture are considered as a whole, fulfilling one complex of requirements …

pp. 746-747 Book Reviews – Modern Architecture in England Modern Architecture in England, with Essays by Henry-Russell, Jr., and Catherine K. Bauer. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. 1937. Published by the Museum. “The work of the English contemporary school in the last few years, still so evidently expanding and improving, sets a mark which we will not easily pass in America … We can understand what the obstacles have been in the way of these men, what temptations to compromise, what general distrust, what whimsical building regulations, what indifference to earlier national steps towards modern architecture they have had to overcome …” It was a particular conjunction of events which gave English architects this chance of making what can be considered to be almost a deliberate choice … This was the time when MARS in this country and the corresponding societies abroad established their ideology and the personalities who are now leading attained the intellectual stability without which their leadership would be ephemeral and worthless …

p. 749 Review of Periodicals – 22 May 1937 Studio – Architect and Building News. 1937. 7 May. P. 155. A studio for art students at the London Zoo. (Lubetkin and Tecton) pp. 789-790 Review of Periodicals – 5 June 1937 Radio Buildings – Kentiku[sic.] Zassi (Tokyo). 1937. April. P. 583 Osaka Broadcasting Station. “Modernised” Japanese interiors. Historical – Architectural Record (New York). 1937. March. 1860-1930. The development of the Modern Movement in England. Article by Nikolaus Pevsner. Biographical – Architectural Review. 1937. April. P. 183 Christopher Dresser, XIX century industrial designer; article by Nikolaus Pevsner.

p. 794 MARS Exhibition of Modern Architecture It has been decided to enlarge considerably the scope of the proposed exhibition of modern architecture organised by Mars. As this necessitates extensive structural changes to the New Burlington Galleries, where the exhibition will take place, the opening is postponed until October.

p. 804 Editorial – 26 June 1937 Meetings in Paris … English architects will be represented at both congresses, M.A.R.S., of course at C.I.A.M. in strength , and a good representation at the Reunion, headed by Mr. Howard Robertson and possibly Mr. Goodhart-Rendel as R.I.B.A. delegates …

pp. 805-812 Architecture and Science by J. D. Bernal, Lecturer in Crystallography, University of Cambridge.

pp. 851-852 Membership Lists – Applications for Membership Election : 19 July 1937 – As Hon. Corresponding Members Behrens: Peter, Dr. H.C. Professor fur Architektur; Mitglied und Senator der Preussischen Akademie der Kunste; Woyrsch-strasse 30J, Berlin, W.35, Germany. Proposed by the Council. Hoffmann: Josef, Architekt Oberbaurat Professor; Dr. Ing. h.c. der Technischen Hochschule Berlin; Dr. h.c. der Technischen Hochschude, Dresden; Ord. Mitglied der Akademie der Kunste, Berlin; Stubenring, 3, Wien 1, Austria. Proposed by the Council. Le Corbusier: 35 Rue de Sevres, Paris Vie, France. Proposed by the Council. Oud: Jacobus Johannes Pieter, 29 Villeneuvesingel, Hillegersberg, Rotterdam, Holland. Proposed by the Council. Van de Velde: Henry, Professor Emerite de l’Universite de Gand; Directeur-Honoraire de l’Institut Superieur des Arts Decoratifs de l’Etat, etc., Avenue Albert I, Tervueren, Belgium. Proposed by the Council.

pp. 865-869 The Architect To-Day by H.S. Goodhart-Rendel (President-Elect) … The architect I have been speaking to you about, the typical architect of to-day, knows, or should know, enough about engineering to see that his engineering is properly done and enough about decoration to see that his decoration is properly done. He is under no greater obligation than that … The architect, above all else, must be a man with common sense.

p. 891 Book Reviews - Designer – Maker – User Industrial Art in England by Nikolaus Pevsner. Cambridge 1937 Reviewed by John Gloag [Hon. A.] … This book is enriched with descriptive flashes of such lucidity that it may well take its place not only as one of the most readable works on design in industry but as the most authoritative, for it is based on research, not only in various departments of industry but among the educational and propaganda organisations that have been struggling for years to improve standards of design. Here is one of Dr. Pevsner’s flashes: “The modern movement means (thank heaven!) the superiority of architecture over the fine arts” …

p. 899 Accessions to the Library – 17 July 1937 Educational – Gropius (Walter) Bauhausbauten Dessau. (Bauhausbucker, 12.) Munich [1930 or after.] Allied Arts and Archaeology – Pevsner (Nikolaus) An Enquiry into industrial art in England. Cambridge 1937

pp. 901-909 Reinforced Concrete Houses – Illustrated by two houses at Moor Park, Hertfordshire, and at Wentworth, Surrey, by Connell, Ward & Lucas … The movement in design which these houses represent has suffered from being copied by persons who do not grasp the structural and planning techniques which are its basis. Features that are typical of post and panel building, as, for example, the continuous horizontal window, have been incorporated in solid wall structures (to which they are quite unsuited) by devices of doubtful ingenuity. The modern movement has been extensively blamed for these “modernistic” copies, of which the hallmark is a usually obvious insincerity …

pp. 910 –911 Paris, 1937 … the Japanese pavilion by a pupil of Corbusier, intimately Japanese and palpably “international” … A long way behind comes Great Britain with one of the best sites in the exhibition and one of the worst exhibits … The first inscription, almost, which greets the visitor to the pavilion is a statement that pheasant, grouse, partridge and all kinds of game abound in Great Britain – where sport is a national pastime, or something to that effect … But what of architecture? In practically every other national pavilion the buildings of the country are shown, not only as features of national life which on their own account deserve attention, but as the proper backgrounds to industry, art, education and government. There are photographs and models and even plans. Here in Britain our positive neglect is only emphasised by the inclusion of the week-end house pictures; better indeed those than nothing but surely the contribution of building to the life of this country is not so negligible …

p. 957 Book Reviews – Garden Chinoserie Chinese Influence on European Garden Structures by E. von Erlberg. Harvard University Press 1936 … The author of this book has done a service to students of architectural history by the careful analysis of a very large amount of literature on the subject, and is apparently tempted by the thought that the study of the Chinese garden by Europeans, superficial though it was, brought about the 18th-century movement away from formally planned landscape towards informality and artificial nature as much as anything else … It is doubtful whether any phase of design can be judged adequately from literary evidence, but this book treats an elusive subject with an efficiency that makes one hope for further studies on matters of larger architectural value by the same author.

p. 969 Allied Societies – Manchester Society Professor A.E. Richardson [F.] gave a public lecture at the University of Manchester recently. This was organised by the Manchester Society, the Institute of Builders and the Royal Manchester Institution. … In England we read of the difficulty of upkeep, and the risk of disintegration of walling, faults due to the elimination of features which time and climate have proved to be essential. These Icarus flights into realms of design evoke just contempt. The “modern-looking” building, therefore, is something to be viewed with suspicion if not entire distrust. How much better it would be if the public could distinguish between contemporary and “modern”. The exponents of modernism adopted a system of construction which they borrowed from engineers, secondly they proceeded to adapt the system of architectural work without taking precautions against weather conditions. What is still more reprehensible in the pursuit of novelty the basic principles of design were discarded … Modernism as it is expressed to-day rests on an insecure foundation; it has not yet been realised by the innovators that the art of architecture depends upon the inner springs of idealism, and that to-day these springs are wanting …

pp.1012-1013 Book Reviews – Rational Design The Evolving House by A.F. Bemis and John Burchard. Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1936 When the spirit of modern architecture was first inflicted on the profession at the beginning of this century it was seen before any thought had been given to its rightful existence. If architects had studied and followed the growth of these new ideas, their absorbing interest would have left no time for the petty antagonism which was the result of narrowly trained vision … Apart from periodicals and reports, “The Evolving House, Rational Design,” is the first book in the R.I.B.A. Library which describes a system of factory-made housing parts ready for erection … Part I is an historical survey of the home from a cave to the present day house and concludes that “the Modernistic Intellectualism” of Europe is no reflection of contemporary conditions … Seaside Houses and Bungalows edited by Ella Carter London: Country Life 1937 … The author in her introduction discusses in general what is characteristic of seaside architecture, but seems to conclude that although differences between seaside building from place to place on the coast were noticeable and important in the past such local variations cannot be expected now that all materials are common property, nor is there now much obvious contrast between inland and seaside building, which is perhaps why houses at Whipsnade, Haywards Heath, Redhill and elsewhere inland have been included … Mr. Gill’s Suicide - Sculpture on Machine-made Buildings by Eric Gill. City of Birmingham School of Printing 1937 … He [Gill] propounds innumerable problems which for the most part he leaves unsolved. His last word is that you “cannot improve machine-made buildings by the addition of hand-made sculptures,” yet there seems to be room even now for Mr. Gill and the two or three other sculptors in Britain whose work is worth having on machine-made buildings even if it is all wrong in theory …

pp. 1016 Review of Periodicals – 11 September 1937 Exhibitions – Architectural Review. 1937. September. Special number on the Paris Exhibition, including Circulation; Design; Display; article by Serge Chermayeff [F.] Architects Journal. 1937. 26 August. P. 325. Paris, 1937. General article with photographs by Howard Robertson [F.] Civic – Kentiku[sic.] Zassi (Tokyo). 1937. July. P. 941. Fire-brigade station, Kôjimati.

pp.1017-1018 Correspondence – Paris Comments from T. Alwyn Lloyd [F.] … I shared with many visitors from this country the sense of disappointment at the British pavilion … It gave one rather a shock on entering our pavilion to see the hunting costumes and the sports outfits displayed; as if these, compared with what we are doing in the world to-day, were of real importance! … Mr. Oliver Hill’s building in itself has so many good features, notably its dignified sense of spaciousness and its admirable stairway, that with a different and much more representative scheme of exhibits we could have really done justice to ourselves …

p. 1028 Editorial – 16 October 1937 B.B.C. and Everyday Things – Every autumn the B.B.C. produces attractively “got up” booklets to advertise and describe the winter series of talks. Several of these booklets dealing with talks connected with art and architecture will be well known to many architects. The latest, on Design in Everyday Things [by Anthony Bertram] is in every way one of the best we have seen. Its production is, as it should be, a model of what such a pamphlet can be made; fresh and simple in design (the cover is by Raymond McGrath) … “It is simply not true,” Mr. Bertram says “that everyone is born with the capacity to judge design.” Those who are trained to evaluate good design are impotent and can rage in their impotence endlessly unless they are prepared to give whole-hearted support to such means as now exist through the B.B.C., the D.I.A., the Council for Art and Industry and the R.I.B.A. Exhibition Committee to educate the public.

pp.1029-1039 Late Victorian Architecture: 1851-1900 by Henry-Russell Hitchcock A lecture delivered at Dartington Hall, Totnes, Devon on 6 July 1937 p. 1038 The Last Twenty Years, the Link with Modernism … others of them, such as Mackmurdo, Townsend and above all Voysey and Mackintosh, men of far greater creative force … Voysey is a more important figure … nearly as positive an aesthetic modernism as the epoch making contemporary houses of Frank Lloyd Wright in America … But more powerful even than the work of Voysey … was the work of Mackintosh in Glasgow. Unfortunately, Mackintosh’s oeuvre is very limited, and although his influence on the Continent was very great indeed, because of the work he did in various expositions, apparently he had almost no influence or following in the British Isles. His true significance has, perhaps, only been appreciated within the last few years, when the influence he sent forth like light to the Continent has been reflected back again in the form of what we to-day recognise as modern architecture …

pp.1040-1043 The “Modern Schools” Exhibition

p. 1069 Review of Periodicals – 16 October 1937 Schools – Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo). 1937. July. P. 12. Primary School at Kurami. Universities – Kentiku[sic.] Zassi (Tokyo). 1937. August. P. 1069 The Naval Hall, the National Gymnasium and the New Hospital, Tokyo Imperial University. Museums and Exhibitions – Architectural Forum (New York). 1937. September. P. 159. Paris, 1937. A survey of the Exhibition, by Henry-Russell Hitchcock. Civic – Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo). 1937. July. P. 1. City Hall, Ube, by T. Murano. Monumental modernism. Hotels and Restaurants – Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo). 1937. July. P. 22 An interesting Japanese restaurant, by K. Isima. R.I.B.A. Journal Volume 45 : November 1937 – October 1938 p. 34 Correspondence – Charles Rennie Mackintosh Comments from Robert Hurd in response to lecture by H.R. Hitchcock … But it is a source of continual astonishment to some of your readers how Mackintosh is calmly absorbed into the corpus of English architecture without question and entirely without reference to the country in which he practised and where he did, at any rate in Glasgow, have some influence. Mr. Hitchcock makes this mistake, and not long ago I noticed another author doing the same thing …

p. 93 Book Reviews – The Modern House in England by F.R.S. Yorke [A.] London: Arch. Press 1937 When Mr. F.R.S. Yorke wrote his book on the modern house in 1934, only a few not very distinguished examples could be found in England worth including. Now he has been able to fill a whole volume with modern English houses, all of which can be said to make a positive contribution to the development of architecture … Although brick is suitable there is no doubt that aesthetically it is as it were on the defensive. Concrete is still the blue-eyed boy to steal the limelight, and no wonder! The new Wentworth house by Connell, Ward & Lucas, McGrath’s house in Surrey, Chermayeff & Mendelsohn’s Chalfont St. Giles house, Fry in Frognal Way, and on a simpler scale the Samuel & Harding house at Bromley, the Lubetkin Whipsnade houses and several others have a gleaming, vigorous positiveness about them. They are the prima donna of modern building that bring flowers to the stage door, even if the more normal, quiet, efficient, honest brickbuilt houses do most of the hard work of the modernity campaign …

pp. 98-99 Review of Periodicals – 22 November 1937 Museums and Exhibitions – The Architectural Review. 1937. November. P. 177. The Architects’ Journal. 1937. 4 November. P. 709. The Architect and Building News. 1937. 5 and 12 November. PP. 166 and 201. New Zoo at Dudley. The layout, which includes 15 buildings, is by Tecton. Domestic – The Architectural Review. 1937. November. PP. 187 and 195. A house near Kingston, Surrey, by E. Maxwell Fry [F.] An excellent example of good modern English work. Barrie House, luxury flats at Lancaster Gate, by Howard Leicester and Partners. Historical – Bulletin of the Society for Research in Chinese Architecture (Peiping). 1937. No. 4. June. Pagodas of the T’ang and Sung periods. Gardens – The Architectural Review. 1937. November. P. 201. The evolution of the 19th-century garden, by Christopher Tunnard. General – The Architectural Review. 1937. November. P. 165. Black and White. An attempt to isolate an idiom of decoration and design peculiar to this country, by J. M. Richards.

p. 104 Membership Lists – Application for Membership Election : 18 October 1937 As Hon. Corresponding Members Gropius: Walter Adolf Georg, Dr. Ing. honoris causa, Professor of Architecture at Harvard University; Cambridge, Mass., U.S.A. Perret: Auguste, Architecte en Chef des Batiments Civils et des Palais Nationaux; Officier de la Legion d’Honneur; Paris, France. Sert Lopez: Josep Lluis, Barcelona Spain.

p. 110 Licentiates and the Fellowship … Licentiates who are eligible and desirous of transferring to the Fellowship can obtain full particulars on application to the Secretary R.I.B.A. stating the clause under which they propose to apply for nomination.

p. 130 Exhibition of Modern Architecture An exhibition of modern architecture organised by the M.A.R.S. (Modern Architectural Research) Group will open at the New Burlington Galleries on 11 January 1938, where it will run for three weeks. A section will afterwards be included in the Building Exhibition at Olympia next autumn and it will also probably be shown in other parts of the country. It was originally planned to take place last summer, but the Group found that the organisation needed to make the exhibition as comprehensive and as thorough as they wished necessitated its postponement until January. … The generally accepted notion that a wall supports the ceiling and a ceiling supports the floor above is no longer universally true. Suspension has replaced support; the hung wall and suspended ceiling result, and lightness and grace are the modern architect’s characteristics instead of solidity …

pp. 131-133 Spotlight on Europe – Mr. Talbot Hamlin, the librarian of the finest collection of architectural books in the U.S.A. – the Avery Library, Columbia University – came to Europe last summer to study European libraries and visit European buildings. A long letter which he sent to an English friend seemed to be so full of penetrating, lively comments that though the letter was not intended for publication we have been able to persuade Mr. Hamlin to allow us to print parts of it. – Ed. … As you will see, I have many nice things to say about the R.I.B.A., which is without doubt the best and most useful library of its kind in the world … I loved the Paris Fair … At Paris, I even liked some of the frankly surrealist buildings, like the Pavilion de l’Elegance Feminin. It was all so alive …

p. 148 Book Reviews – Constructive Art Circle: An International Survey of Constructive Art. Edited by J. L. Martin, Ben Nicholson & N,. Gabo. London: Faber & Faber, 1937. … The editors of Circle have made no attempt – or no obvious attempt – to make their many essayists toe any philosophical line, the points of view are diverse and the quality of the essays uneven. Gabo’s introduction is good – a bit assertive, but so are all these authors; Herbert Read gives the psychological background and Le Corbusier, in a chapter which gains in effect from a personal element of direct serious enthusiasm, proclaims the inevitability of contemporary art and architecture. This chapter has none of the nervous electric quality usually associated with Le Corbusier but is among the most valuable things he has written. The architectural chapters by J. M. Richards, Maxwell Fry, Marcel Breuer, R, T. Neutra, Sartoris, J. L. Martin and Dr. Giedion are mostly more direct, in that they discuss the application rather than the essence of architecture …

p. 151 Review of Periodicals – 6 December 1937 Theatre – Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo). 1937. September. P. 9. Kokusai Theatre, Tokyo, by I. Narimatu. Domestic – Architects’ Journal. 1937. 18 November. P. 784. House near Kingston, by Maxwell Fry [A.]

pp. 163-164 Editorial – 20 December 1937 Registration - … The broad reason for the Bill is that the public do not understand the difference between a registered architect and an architect and there is nothing to prevent any person from masquerading under the title of an architect although he has no qualification …

p. 198 Review of Periodicals – 20 December 1937 Domestic – American Architect (New York) 1937. November. P. 41. Howland residence, Beverley Hills, California, by Frank Lloyd Wright. General – Architectural Review. December 1937. Special issue devoted to interior design. Remodelled Interiors by Serge Chermayeff in Connaught Place, London are especially noteworthy.

p. 200 Accessions to the Library – 1937-1938 – III – 20 December 1937 Domestic – Taut (Bruno) Houses and people of Japan. Tokyo: Sanseido Co. 1937 Yorke (F.R.S.) and Gibberd (Frederick) The Modern flat. London: Archl. Press. 1937

p. 216 Editorial – 10 January 1938 Exhibition of Chinese Art for Chinese Medical Relief – The old R.I.B.A. building in Conduit Street is in use again from 8 to 28 January in a charitable cause: it has been lent free for an exhibition of Chinese Art to help Chinese medical relief …

pp. 217-236 The Case for a Learned Society by E.J. Carter, Librarian Editor R.I.B.A. – A Paper read before the R.I.B.A. on Monday, 20 December 1937. p. 230 Discussion – Mr. R. C. Fisher: … Again, I think we cannot fail to see not only architecture but the whole cause of culture all over the world is at the present moment being threatened and is in great danger. One has only to remember that during the last few weeks twenty-three universities and colleges in China have been destroyed by bombs. I think that is something which we must take into our conscience as a cultural society. I do not know that the Institute has as yet made any pronouncement of sympathy with the Chinese people in the great losses which their culture has suffered in the last few weeks. This evening, for instance, we hear that a Japanese army is now marching on the city of Hangchow, which is full of beautiful old temples and pagodas …

p. 242 The Mars Exhibition … In the second room, shown in the bottom picture, one wall, that on the left, is covered with a photo mural showing modern architecture in the English landscape; a heartfelt exhibit from a group almost every one of whose members can now almost count it an honour to have had a building banned by some reactionary authority. The pergola suggests the alliance of house and garden, while the pierced screen on the right is said to emphasise the universality of modern architecture …

pp, 245-246 Book Reviews – Glass – McGrath & Frost’s New Book Reviewed by Arthur Korn. Glass in Architecture and Decoration by Raymond McGrath and A.C. Frost. London: Arch. Press. 1937 … the pioneers of modern architecture who are evolving new interpretations of glass, of the material itself. They give expression to a new vision of glass and glass building. The glass skyscrapers of Mies van der Rohe, the all-glass buildings of Brinkmann and Van der Vlugt, and of Le Corbusier, a few of the latest American factories, give us an entirely new sense of light …

pp. 247-248 Modern Style Flats by John Dower [A.] The Modern Flat by F.R.S. Yorke and Frederick Gibberd. 1937 … The authors, true to their own works and beliefs, have plumped for style – if the word “style” sufficiently describes the way of thinking which, for lack of a better name, we must call Modernist. Indeed the book would have been better named “The Modernist Flat” … If the work of Gropius and Lubetkin is distinctive and outstanding, it is rather because they have most completely mastered a self-denying art that they have won through to confident self-expression …

p. 254 Review of Periodicals – 10 January 1938 Domestic – Wood. 1937. December. P. 537 Timber house at Sevenoaks by Prof. Walter Gropius. Construction details.

p. 255 Accessions to the Library – 1937-1938 – III (Concluded) – 10 January 1938 - Mackmurdo (A.H.) architect Brine baths, Nantwich. Phot. 1893

pp. 270-272 Editorial – 24 January 1938 MARS - … and try our best in a line or two to say something that will draw or drive members of the profession to what is undoubtedly the most brilliantly presented statement of an architectural idea that has yet been offered to the public or the profession here in London, or probably anywhere else … Two things at least this exhibition shows convincingly : one, that “Modernism” is not “unaesthetic”; here it is seen as the product of minds as keenly and sensitively alert to effect as they are to efficacy; two, that “Modernism is not blindly iconoclastic, but is full of a sense of responsibility to the traditions of the past, human feelings and comfort, and is certainly no less capable of responses to the kindliest delights of nature than an age which could successfully impose palladian mansions on the English countryside …

pp. 290-292 The MARS Group Exhibition Some Considerations of Exhibition Technique … If the Mars Group have tried to put the ideals of modern architecture to the ordinary man, they have certainly used a wrong method. But if, on the other hand, they have aimed at justifying their outlook to their brother architects and to that lay class who for want of a better name have been labelled the “intelligentsia,” they have succeeded very well indeed. To the person who is tickled and not frightened by an abstract composition, who gets a kick out of good shapes and colours, and who (this is very important) already knows a good deal about architecture, the Exhibition is stimulating and even exciting. First, it should kill stone dead certain extravagant notions of modern architecture and modern architects which have long been in circulation in circles where architecture is discussed. These include “the cult of ugliness”; that modern architects are deliberately “stunting”; that modern architecture is based solely on the theory of functionalism. It will make clear that the modern movement is a burning belief of large groups of intelligent and well-trained young architects in all the principal countries of the world, that, indeed, it is a force world-wide and growing …

pp. 293-300 A House in Surrey Architect: Raymond McGrath, B.Arch. [A.] The Site – This house, of reinforced concrete, replaces an earlier house, mainly of the eighteenth century, which had suffered from awkward alternations and additions. The site is twenty-five acres of garden and park land, containing some magnificent trees. The collaborating landscape architect, Mr. Christopher Tunnard, has reformed the surroundings of the house so that it is now seen to stand on the crest of sweeping slopes of lawn and so that the views from it are varied and extensive …

pp. 312-313 Review of Periodicals – 24 January 1938 Industrial – Architect and Building News. 1938. 14 January. P. 47. Tobacco factory at Linz, Austria by Alexander Popp and Peter Behrens. A large group of steel-framed buildings, with continuous windows and air-conditioned factory units. Domestic – Architects’ Journal. 1938. 6 January. P, 8. Reinforced concrete house at Mirvil Road, Lee-on-Solent, by F.R.S. Yorke and Marcel Breuer, analysed in detail.

p. 316 Accessions to the Library – 24 January 1938 Materials – McGrath (Raymond) and Frost (A.C.) Glass in architecture and decoration. With a section on the nature and properties of glass by H.E. Beckett. London: Archl. Press. 1937 Town and Country Planning, Gardens, Rural Preservation – Dutton (Ralph) The English garden. (British Heritage Series) London 1937 Greber (Jacques) Jardins modernes. (Exposition Internationale [Paris] ae 1937) Paris: Moreau [1937]

pp. 329-336 The President’s Address to Students Delivered at the R.I.B.A. on Monday, 24 January, at 8.30 p.m. p. 331 … In the kind of slang architecture aptly described as modernistic you will find that logic has been put on afterwards just as style used to be. The architect felt like a balcony in one place and a patch of glass bricks in another and only at the last moment has contrived for them some apparent reasons for existence … Modernistic buildings and buildings that are self-consciously picturesque can both be very pleasing when perpetrated by clever men, and no doubt many of you are clever enough to produce them to your own satisfaction and that of some other people. Those of you that are not clever enough will equally try to produce them with no worse results than most to which the public is already hardened … p. 336 Vote of thanks – Professor A. E. Richardson: … The President has given us a complete statement of the present position without mentioning the words “traditional,” “functional” or any of the other shibboleths, and yet in a spirit of mischief he has coined the phrase “super-realism.’

p. 341 Correspondence – Highfalutin Comment from L. Sylvester Sullivan [F.] Dear Sir, - It may amuse you to know that a remark at luncheon the other day set me thinking, and I have been cogitating a philippic on the involved long-wordedness of the exponents of the “new” in architecture, which may (but most likely not) be polite enough for the Journal … Such expressions as fundamental organic functionalism can surely only mean and refer to bodily and very human processes. Thus only can we arrive “through a welter of academic mediocrity” to the “plateaux which occur in the historical ascent of every intellectual movement and which facilitate the permeation of newly formed concepts into the main body of professional and public opinion.” Their architecture is too good to deserve that! …

pp. 355-356 Review of Periodicals – 7 February 1938 Schools – Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo). 1936. No. 11. P. 6. Nagatotyo Primary School. A large modern school by Municipal Architectural Section, Tokyo. Museums and Exhibitions – Architects’ Journal. 1938. 20 January. P. 121. The MARS exhibition of Modern Architecture, reviewed by E. Maxwell Fry [A.]. Good exhibition planning and technique. Sports – Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo). 1936. No. 11. P. 1. Hot spring public bath at Noboribetu. Biographical – Architectural Forum (New York). 1938. January. An issue devoted to the work of Frank Lloyd Wright, designed and written by him. Among the many buildings excellently illustrated are Taliesin, the architects’[sic.] home and workshop and the Taliesin Fellowship Building; Fallingwater, a remarkable forest lodge; office interior, Pittsburg …

pp. 356-357 Accessions to the Library – 1937-1938 – V – 7 February 1938 Architecture – History MARS (Modern Architectural Research) Group New architecture. An exhibition of the elements of modern architecture … London 1938 Cremers (P.J.) Peter Behrens. Sein werk von 1909 bis zur gegenwart. Essen: Baedeker [1928 or later]

p. 363 Allied Societies Activities Professor W. G. Holford [A.] read a paper to the Manchester Society on 12 January on “Recent Architecture in and around Paris.” He said that France could show an architecture more daring, more experimental, more intransigent, more polished and sometimes more horrible in its extremes than our own … From the great mass of architecture that had arisen in and especially round Paris since the war, Professor Holford chose three main types of building – a municipal building, some schools and working-class flats; and three representative architects – Le Corbusier, Perret and Roux Spitz, for the purpose of his lecture …

pp. 389-395 The Annual Dinner held in the Henry Florence Hall on Friday, 11 February 1938, the President, Mr. H.S. Goodhart-Rendel [F.], in the chair p. 391 … Now every Associate of our Institute is, as it were, a guaranteed article, tested and approved by means of examinations. Our Licentiates are those whose record of serious architectural practice can be accepted in lieu of a test. Our Fellows are ex-Associates or ex-Licentiates mellowed by time …

pp. 396-7 Health, Sport and Fitness Exhibition - 2-31 March 1938

p. 404 Review of Periodicals – 21 February 1938 Radio – L’Architecture d’Aujourd’hui. 1937. December. P. 34. Broadcasting Stations. A fifty-page section, article on technical characteristics of a broadcasting station, and, among many illustrated stations … B.B.C. (London) … Domestic – Architectural Review. 1938. February. PP. 57 & 75. Good examples of modern timber houses in Kent by Gropius and Fry …

p. 408 Correspondence – Highfalutin Reply from the Author of the Introduction to the MARS Catalogue [A.] Dear Sir, - May I beg Mr. L. Sylvester Sullivan to take the straw out of his hair, mop his desperately low brow, adjust his tie, sit down quietly, and re-read the introduction to the MARS Catalogue? It is quite intelligible – really it is, I ought to know … Also a letter on the subject from E. Frazer Tomlins [F.] Dear Sir, - Thank God for Mr. L. Sylvester Sullivan’s letter in the February number. It is a bit of fresh, clean British air, and a good antidote to the poor simpletons who are being sold a pup by the influx from the Continent (not to mention some other parts of Mother Earth) …

p. 439 Extracts from The President’s Speech at the Dinner of the West Yorkshire Society of Architects at Leeds on 25 February … The public is naturally apt to think that every man who puts the word architect on his door-plate and notepaper has some professional qualification, and the Bill would do nothing more than ensure that this was the fact …

pp. 449-450 Book Reviews – Six Books on Now and Then The Spirit of Modern Building – Modern Building: Its Nature, Problems and Forms by Walter Curt Behrendt. London 1938 Reviewed by Hugh Casson [A.] … The great figures of the modern movement – Wagner, Hoffmann, Loos, Van de Velde, Oud, Van de Rohe of Europe and Sullivan and Wright of America – are dispassionately examined and classified with unerring accuracy. The work of Le Corbusier receives perhaps the most brilliant and sound evaluation which has ever been made. The acknowledged inability of the modern school to produce monumental architecture is logically explained by the suggestion that the ideals and spirit of the age are not sufficiently clear-cut to be expressed in monumental form. Our time is a period of crisis, a borderline between two ages. It is not surprising, therefore that modern architecture is still rather harsh and unformed, representing as it does the unsettled age in which it arises. Because, too, this crisis is world-wide, modern architecture is international and universal in character. …

p. 450 Rolling on – Decorative Art. The Studio Year Book, 1938. The 1938 Studio Year Book of Decorative Art proposes the theory that we are settling down. “The world,” the editor suggests, “is not altogether happy with the starkness of architecture and decoration which has been proposed in recent times as an end in itself.” So now we are moving forward to a period in which decoration comes again into its own. That there has been a revival of decoration may be true to a very limited extent, but surely it is wrong to suggest that anyone from the ranks of modernism whose opinion counts has proposed starkness as an end in itself; certainly none of the people who are presumably referred to here …

p. 456 Correspondence – Highfalutin Response from L. Sylvester Sullivan [F.] … The Mars Group have something interesting to say that is worth while. For goodness sake let them say it in a way that is not an irritation or annoyance; in a way that is comparable to some of their architecture, which, seen in its right-setting, can be lovely – set in woods against trees it can be as gracious as an old manor-house … If the Group is not mindful it will be credited with the work of the speculators who are speculating with the life-savings of newly-weds who will be paying for years to come for the love-hutches they are being taught to believe are the thing. Far too many to the acre, all angularity, jostling and cocking snooks at each other from their corner windows …

pp. 496-499 The Architect and Housing by the Speculative Builder Article IX – Steel Framed Houses – A Scheme by Denis Poulton [A.]

pp. 503-505 Review of Periodicals – 21 March 1938 Museums and Exhibitions – Architectural Review. 1938. March. P. 109. A pictorial record of the MARS group exhibition of the elements of modern architecture, including a note of appreciation by Le Corbusier. Hospitals, etc. The Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo). 1937. December. P. 1. Tokyo Teisin Hospital and Katayama Hospital. Domestic Buildings – L’Architecture d’Aujourd’hui (Paris). 1938. January. P. 43. Modern houses in England, by Gropius & Fry, Lubetkin & Tecton, and Connell, Ward & Lucas. Many examples of houses in America and Europe are also given in this issue. Biographical – Architectural Review. 1938. March. P. 141. Arthur H. Mackmurdo, a pioneer designer whose evolutionary importance lies between Morris and C.F.A. Voysey. A biographical article by N. Pevsner. General – L’Architecture d’Aujourd’hi (Paris). 1938. January. P. 2. A general survey of the position of architecture, in the United States, the beginnings of a real American style … Extracts from Le Corbusier’s “Quand les Cathedrals etaient blanches” … Architectural Review. 1938. March. P. 127. The Garden in the Modern Landscape, by Christopher Tunnard. The article includes a graphic summary of the development of the garden at St. Anne’s Hill, Chertsey, over a period of 200 years. Stavba (Prague). 1937. No. 4. An issue devoted to modern architecture in England. Article by F.R.S. Yorke, with many illustrations of well-known contemporary work.

p. 551 Review of Periodicals – 11 April 1938 Gardens – Architectural Review. 1938. April. P. 195. The functional aspect of garden planning by Christopher Tunnard.

p. 563 Allied Societies’ Activities On 9 March a paper on “The Use and Mis-use of Building Materials” was given by Professor A. E. Richardson [F.] to the Liverpool Architectural Society. The lecturer had a number of scathing criticisms to make against the tendency of to-day to be original at all costs and to introduce constructional methods that were doubtful in form, and materials that were still in an experimental stage. He referred specifically to the mis-use of the beam, support and cantilever, which, under the guise of originality, had produced the weird mannerisms that were so much disliked … Much of it was imitation engineering … At another recent meeting of this Society Mr. W.S. Purchon [F.], Head of the Welsh School of Architecture, read a paper on “English Architecture, 1890 to 1950 : A Retrospect and a Forecast” … He believed there was a distinct possibility of architecture developing in such a way that there would be far greater agreement on the matter of design, amongst members of the profession, than was the case at any time during the last century. He thought that a truly national style would evolve, a style adapted to suit modern conditions, and one to the creation of which all architects would contribute …

p. 565 Membership Lists – Applications for Membership Election : 9 May 1938 – As Fellows Coates: Wells, B.A., B.Sc., Ph.D., 18 Yeoman’s Row, S.W.3. Proposed by Professor C.H. Reilly, H. Austen Hall and C.H. James.

p. 619 Review of Periodicals – 25 April 1938 General – Architectural Association Journal. 1938. April. P. 447. The conditions for an architecture for to-day. A paper by Wells Coates

p. 665 Book Reviews – Modern World Architecture –reviewed by M.J.H.B. Nuova Architettura Nel Mondo by Agnoldomenico Pica. Milan 1948 … In the Preface, Pagano attempts an outline of the aesthetics of modern architecture and stresses the necessity for careful judgment in criticising it. Pica follows this with a summary of the material available for the study of the development of modern architecture, and gives an historical survey of his subject which is too brief to be of any importance. Though he gives precedence to Paxton’s Crystal Palace as being the first manifestation of the new technique, the author omits to refer to any contributions from this country after the days of Ruskin and Morris … The surprising omission of many notable names, including, amongst others, Gropius, Mendelsohn, Mies van der Rohe and Dudok, can perhaps be explained partly by the limitation of the period of reference to the years between 1933 and 1936 … In spite of the limitation of reference the selection of buildings for illustration has been made with judgement. The choice of Le Corbusier for the start of the series proves the good intentions of the author …

pp. 706-708 The Hall Crown Shop, Croydon Architect: Oliver P. Bernard [L.]

p. 722 Membership Lists - Election : 9 May 1938 In accordance with the terms of Byelaws 10 and 11, the following candidates for membership were elected at the Council Meeting held on Monday, 9 May 1938. As Fellows – Coates: Wells, B.A., B.Sc., Ph.D.

p. 732 Editorial – 13 June 1938 Peter Behrens – One of the most distinguished of R.I.B.A. Honorary Corresponding Members, Professor Peter Behrens celebrated his seventieth birthday on 14 April. However much the paternity of whatever is called “modern” may be disputed there is agreement everywhere about the superlative quality of Behrens’ contribution …

pp. 744-750 Open Air School – Swinton and Pendlebury, Lancashire Architect” Hubert Bennett [A.]

p. 766 Accessions to the Library – 1937-1938 – XI – 13 June 1938 Architecture – History Congres Internationaux d’Architecture Moderne (C.I.A.M.) 5e congres, Paris, 1937. (Livre du -.) Logis et loisirs. Urbanisme [19]37. (Collection de l’equipment de la civilisation machiniste.) Presented by M. Le Corbusier, and P. Architecture Vivante, journal, publ. Le Corbusier. Oeuvre plastique. Peintures et dessins; architecture. Paris [1937 or –38]

pp. 768-769 Review of Periodicals – 13 June 1938 Museums and Exhibitions – Builder. 1938. 20 May. P. 983. Architect and Building News. 1938. 13 May. P. 166. Architecture Illustrated. 1938. May. P. 123. The Empire Exhibition, Glasgow. Illustrated commentaries on the buildings and general plan. Cinemas and Film Studios – L’Architecture d’Aujourdhui (Paris). 1938. April. P. 32. A 50-page section dealing with the problems of film studios and their accessory services … English studios include those at Denham by Messrs. Joseph and at Shepperton by Messrs. Connell, Ward & Lucas and the Pinewood studios … Studio – Architectural Record (New York). 1938. May. P. 62. Artists’ studio at the London Zoo by Lubetkin and Tecton.

pp. 847-850 The President’s Inaugural Address … Houses were to be machines to live in, offices machines to work in, restaurants machines to be fed in, theatres (I suppose), machines to be amused in. From this emotional condition we have two immediate legacies, one bad and one good … The bad legacy … With a complete neglect of any good manners and urbanity, people leave their living- and their working-machines about in places where their appearance is most incongruous, tossing a great living-machine into an elegant district … The good legacy is that these internal troubles have been eased, that the tight stays of Edwardian stylism has been loosened, and that planning has not been denied its full natural development … p. 850 A bit of Victorianism or a bit of Edwardianism or even a bit of modernism, cannot harm any robust village if the Victorianism, the Edwardianism or the modernism is naked and unashamed. Unfortunately, Victorianism and Edwardianism was much apt to be ashamed, and to hide its nakedness in garments from the historical costumiers. Nobody would accuse modernism of shame, but its self-assertiveness often makes it unpleasant in any surroundings, old or new …

pp. 851-856 Architecture and the Public To-day by J.E. Barton, [Hon. A.R.I.B.A.] p. 854 … The point I am trying to make is that we are now beginning to breed a new public for architecture: a public which will be worth working for, because it not only will enjoy building, but will have learned to apply an architectural standard to all its judgements …

p. 887 Accession to the Library – 18 July 1938 Interiors, Details, Fittings – Dye (D.S.) A Grammar of Chinese lattice. Harvard 1937

p. 889 Review of Periodicals – 18 July 1938 Exhibitions – Architectural Review. 1938. July Issue devoted to architecture at the Empire Exhibition, Glasgow. J. M. Richards contributes a useful critical survey and most of the principal buildings are illustrated. In a section headed Comparative Criticism, Glasgow’s ways of dealing with recurrent design problems are shown beside those of previous exhibitions. Architecture Illustrated. 1938. June. P. 154. Some excellent photographs of buildings at the Glasgow Exhibition.

pp. 918-922 The Rights of Leisure by A.J. Symons A lecture delivered at the Health, Sport and Fitness Exhibition at the R.I.B.A. – the drawing are by Hugh Casson [A.] p. 919 … Whatever may be said concerning the economic necessity of the minimum flat, of its trouble-saving compensations, of its advantages to the bachelor or city worker, one thing at least can hardly be denied concerning them; that with a few inconsiderable exceptions they are a restraining influence upon family life, and that they limit the employment of leisure to amusements which can be followed elsewhere or which require no space. Which of these is the graver evil from the national point of view I am not called upon to decide. The title I have chosen for this random address is “The Rights of Leisure”; and it is with the limitations of leisure imposed p. 920 increasingly upon us to-day that I wish to deal … A man in a small room

p. 921 cannot enjoy himself as much as a man in a big one … The road from London to Chelmsford, like the road from London to the south coast, is lined with tasteless dwellings filled with individuals who are fast becoming cinema-watching, football-watching, wireless-fed automatons …

pp.923-925 House at Burn Bridge, Harrogate – Architect: John C. Procter [F.]

pp. 933-934 Book Reviews – Foreign Art and Topography A Grammar of Chinese Lattice by Daniel Sheets Dye. Harvard 1937 Reviewed by Arnold Silcock [F.] … As one would expect, the author had difficulty in tracing literary sources. He found very few – almost all Chinese; but The Director, 1755, Thomas Chippendale, London, supplied some valuable evidence …

p. 939 Correspondence – Modern Sculpture Letter from E. Frazer Tomlins [F.] Sir,- On page 855 of the Journal for 18 July there is a photograph of a piece of sculpture, representing an “ape-like” woman [by Henry Moore]. Underneath the photograph is written “Why is it that a severe modern building, or a somewhat abstract work of architectural sculpture, will cause resentment or even rage in a crowd of nice quiet people, who in their own lives have not given one consecutive hour to serious study of the arts?” I have yet to meet the “nice quiet people” who resent such “severe modern buildings,” as for instance the new University and other good examples. Regarding the piece of sculpture shown, and all other such : it is that “nice quiet people” who by definition are the opposite to noisy, vulgar people, have an instinctive loathing of the bestial in both life and art? When sculpture is written all over with sex, sex, sex, they do not take to it. I feel that the kind of caption under this photograph is as old fashioned as the sculpture, which was invented by certain noisy people about twenty-five years ago …

p. 955 Editorial – 12 September 1938 The “Small House” Exhibition – The subject of the Institute’s autumn exhibition is the small house provided for the person of moderate means …

pp. 989-990 Review of Periodicals – 12 September 1938 Museum and Exhibitions – Dom-Osiedle-Mieskanie (Warsaw). 1938. No. 6-7. P. 49. Photographs of Le Corbusier’s “Temps Nouveau” Pavilion at the 1937 Paris Exhibition. Historical – Dom-Osiedle-Mieskanie (Warsaw). 1938. No. 6-7. P. 2. Ten Years Work of the C.I.A.M., 1928-1938 by H. and S. Syrkus. Biographical – Shelter (Detroit). 1938. April. P. 26. “Walter Gropius,” an article by G. Holmes Perkins, with an introduction by Henry-Russell Hitchcock, Jr. A complete list of Gropius’ works to date is included.

p. 991 Correspondence – Modern Sculpture Comment from John J. Cresswell [F.] Sir, - I am, perhaps, a bit squeamish and old-fashioned, but I, and perhaps a few other old-timers, do not much enjoy the “Sculpture by Henry Moore,” p. 855 of the Journal … The executioner whose work is here represented was evidently a bungler. The left thigh and the right upper arm are well and truly fractured … Let Mr. Moore try again, and give us the patient properly smashed up. For those who like that sort of thing, this ought to be just what they would like …

Editorial – 17 October 1938 Mr. Frank Lloyd Wright’s Lectures – as we go to press we hear from the Secretary of the Sulgrave Manor Board that Mr. Frank Lloyd Wright has cabled to say that through unavoidable circumstances he has been compelled to postpone his visit to England, during which he was to have given a series of four lectures at the R.I.B.A. on 8, 10, 15 and 17 November. The Sulgrave Board will announce the revised dates for the lectures as soon as they have been able to arrange them with Mr. Frank Lloyd Wright. His subject will be “Organic Architecture - The Idea, The Movement, The Scene at Present, and The Future.”

pp.1012-1013 The “Small House” Exhibition … The final lesson is that a serious effort to meet present-day needs by modern methods will result in a return to the tradition of good simple building, but that the resulting houses will resemble neither the genuine buildings of past ages nor their “olde-worlde” imitations … Most of the facts and ideas presented are not new to architects, but they are largely unrealised by the public generally. The Exhibition is indeed no more than a clear statement of the things that should go to make up a good house – a “story” that we believe has never before been presented to the public.

p. 1028 Book Reviews – Art Books More Colour Schemes for the Modern Home by Duncan Miller. London: The Studio 1938. Reviewed by D.B. … The amateur decorator will find a confusing choice; between, for example, the exhibitionism of Mr. Marshall, the period refinement of Mr. Shryver, the modernisms of Mr. Patmore and Mr. Iles … A development of the social implications – the snob values – of interior decorating would have made far more entertaining and instructive reading than the conventional analysis into monotone schemes, harmonies, contrasts and so on …

p. 1031 Review of Periodicals – 17 October 1938 Domestic – Architectural Review. 1938. October. P. 161. Highpoint Number Two, a block of flats by Tecton, adjoining the earlier Highpoint Number One on Highgate Hill. Interesting analysis of various schemes successively submitted to the Council, and very fully illustrated description of the final building with good explanatory diagrams. Architectural Review. 1938. October. P. 155. Reinforced concrete house in Frognal, Hampstead, by Connell, Ward and Lucas [A/A.].

p. 1037 Accessions to the Library – 17 October 1938 Architecture – Theory – Gropius (Walter) Internationale architekur. (Bauhausbucher, I, ed. by Walter Gropius and L. Moholy-Nagy.) Munich 1927 Giedion (Siegfried) Walter Gropius. (Les artistes nouveaux series). Paris 1931 Allied Arts – Buhne Die Buhne im Bauhaus (Bauhausbucher, 4, ed. by Walter Gropius and L. Moholy-Nagy.) Munich [19--.] Bauhauswerkstatten Neue arbeiten der Bauhauswerkstatten. (Bauhausbucher 7, ed. by Walter Gropius and L. Moholy-Nagy.) Munich 1925 Moholy-Nagy (L.) Malerei, Fotografie, Film. (Bauhausbucher. 8. ed. Walter Gropius and L. Moholy-Nagy.) Munich [19--.] R.I.B.A. Journal Volume 46 : November 1938 – October 1939 pp. 24-26 The “Small House” Exhibition – The Opening Ceremony Mr. J. B. Priestley, LL.D., D.Litt.: … I was glad to see in the exhibition that we are getting away from a tendency which was prevalent a few years ago, when modern architects who had had little trips to France and Italy and Sweden and America brought back a kind of architecture which was unsuited to our climate. The kind of house that they showed you in their photographs always had the sun blazing down on it, with a few people reclining with a minimum of clothes on. I do not know whether you have seen any of those houses after three months’ steady rain in the North of England. They look like something from the old Earl’s Court Exhibition! … But we do like to be cosy, and you cannot be cosy in one of these functional rooms which are nearly all window. I think that we are getting away from that now …

p. 26 The “Small House” Exhibition by Miss M. Howlett Thursday 13 October 1938, at 10.20 p.m., Fourth News This is the script of a broadcast talk on the “Small House” Exhibition, Given by a woman member of the B.B.C. staff on the day that the Exhibition was opened. The script, which has been kindly supplied by the B.B.C., is reproduced exactly as received. … Then there are designs for houses that get morning sun in the bedrooms and bathrooms, afternoon sun in the living rooms, and no sun at all in the larder, and showing how much nicer it is to have large panes of glass with no glazing bars and how costs can be cut by a simplicity of design that is not only attractive but gives a sense of freedom as well. Simplicity in design is a feature, too, of cupboards, doors, windows and fittings of every description, and they are of materials which take a minimum time to clean … And so it seems that if we only want things enough we can have them: at least, this little exhibition seems to prove that good design, materials and labour-saving fittings are not luxuries to be afforded only by the well-to-do.

pp. 32-34 Architecture at International Exhibitions The following memorandum was prepared last April on the suggestion of the Foreign Relations Committee by a joint sub-committee of the F.R.C. and the Exhibitions sub-committee. The purpose of the memorandum was to provide the Institute for general public use with a statement, as the title says, of its “attitude … to the presentation of Architecture at International Exhibitions.” It was felt that those inside the Institute who are interested in the matter and have watched some past International Exhibitions of British Arts, Industries and Life, with a feeling near to shame, and those who have the task, infinitely more difficult than watching, of actually organising the British exhibits would benefit from a simple considered statement of the place that Architecture can take and should take in the National exhibit. Conclusion – It is not the Royal Institute’s intention to force architecture aggressively into the foreground everywhere, but merely to press for recognition of the fact that architecture is the inescapable background against which every human activity may be seen in its cultural and artistic perspective … our failure to emphasise on such public occasions as international exhibitions that the art of architecture is particularly alive to-day in England has resulted in some loss of prestige which it is our duty to remove not by allowing it to be thought that the only buildings worth seeing in Britain were built before the 19th century, but by drawing attention to all the best work that is being done now.

p. 40 Review of Periodicals – 7 November 1938 Houses – Architects’ Journal. 1938. 27 October. P. 696. Architect and Building News. 1938. 28 October. P. 99. Reinforced concrete house in Frognal, Hampstead, by Connell, Ward and Lucas [AA.] Flats – Architects’ Journal. 1938. 13 October. P. 601 Highpoint Number Two, a reinforced concrete block of flats at Highgate, by Tecton. Building. 1938. October. P. 397 R.C. frame block of flats at 65 Ladbroke Grove, by E.Maxwell Fry [A.] Biographical – Architect, Builder and Engineer (Cape Town). 1938. August. P. 22. Article on Frank Lloyd Wright, “stormy petrel of architecture.”

p. 41 Accessions to the Library – 1938-1939 – I – 7 November 1938 Architecture – Theory [Le Corbusier, pseud.] Des canons, des munitions? Merci! Des logis … s.v.p. (Monographie du Pavillon des Temps Nouveaux a l’Exposition Internationale Art et Technique de Paris 1937.) Boulogne: Architecture d’Aujourd’hui 1938 History – Sekino (Tadashi) and Takeshima (Takuichi) Jehol. The most glorious & monumental relics in Manchoukuo. 4 vols. In 2 cases. Tokyo: Zauho Press. 1934. Presented by the Japanese Embassy.

pp. 43-44 Correspondence – Maillart and Moore Further comments from John J. Cresswell [F.] and response from the editor … We print Mr. Cresswell’s letter, but we wonder a bit how patiently an architect would tolerate such phrases used about not his work only but his manners, morals and mentality.

p. 51 Editorial – 21 November 1938 For What We Have Received … Other gifts are of some fifty sketch books and note books compiled by W.R. Lethaby from the age of 17 until the last years of his life …

pp. 61-66 The Inaugural Address by the President, Mr. H.S. Goodhart-Rendel Read before the R.I.B.A. on Monday, 7 November 1938 p. 62 … From among the architectural output of the year, however, I may mention particularly the Glasgow Exhibition, not so much for the intrinsic excellence of its lay-out and of many of its buildings as for the lesson it teaches that good architecture pays. We believe that this lesson has been well digested by those in control of our national representation at the forthcoming great exhibition in America. Nevertheless, good as the buildings were at Glasgow, good as they promise to be at New York, we could wish that the designs for both had been the subjects of open competition … p. 66 Vote of Thanks – Mr. Alfred C. Bossom, M.P. [F.]: … I most emphatically endorse what the President has said about competitions. I am sure that in the countries where architecture is the leading national profession (which we are going to make it here) competition is respected much more than it is in this country. I know that in the United States of America, France, Sweden and elsewhere competition occupies an envied place …

pp. 68-70 Presentation of the R.I.B.A. Bronze medal and diploma for 1937 to Messrs. Robert Atkinson for a block of flats in Prince Albert Road, Regents Park.

pp. 93-94 Book Reviews – The Art of Architecture by Professor A.E. Richardson and Professor H.O. Corfiato. London: United Universities Press 1938 … For reasons which cannot be discussed here there has developed in England in recent years a self-conscious feeling among some parts of the profession that they are supporting not merely their particular view of history but the very structure of historical study itself. This comes from a belief, which is quite unjustified, that historical studies are now despised, that contemporary opinion is that old buildings don’t count, that, as Henry Ford said, history is all bunk … How can history substantiate the demand that industrial architecture must mind its own stylistic business apart from the universality of form and expression that will be evident in architecture of any time and style? …

p. 100 Correspondence – Maillart and Moore Letter from J. R. Mewton [L.] Sir, - Art must find fresh forms of expression, not merely fresh media … I submit, with great respect to Mr. Cresswell, that Moore is a poet in the widest sense … When we approach them with clean minds, we get the thrill which art can give and that spiritual appeal which may be sex but not sexual.

p. 147 Book Reviews – History and Commentary Malice Aforethought – Pillar to Post by Osbert Lancaster London 1938 Reviewed by K. J. Cambell [A.] … the author follows the unrolling panorama of architecture from Stonehenge to Highpoint with a sharp, malicious humour, pinning down, as it were, under glass, a sample of each period for our inspection with a wily and deceptively child-like simplicity. His exposition of the subtle shades of development in twentieth century building from the heart-pierced shutters of Art Nouveau by way of Wimbledon Transitional to Bye-Pass Variegated is monumental and depressing … the only obvious mistake in the book, which is amusing but entirely inaccurate parallel drawn by the author between Nazi and Soviet Russian architecture. In point of fact public opinion in the U.S.S.R. has long since repudiated the early ideas of abolishing decoration and the people, feeling for the first time the exhilaration of their new prosperity, are demanding and getting a visible expression of this feeling in an exuberance of detail which would probably damage irreparably the susceptibilities of a western intellectual …

p. 152 Accession to the Library – 1938-1939 – III – 5 December 1938 Architecture – Education Lancaster (Osbert) Pillar to post. The pocket lamp of architecture. London: John Murray 1938 History – Reilly (C.H.) Scaffolding in the sky. A semi-architectural autobiography. London: Routledge 1938 Wright (Frank Lloyd) An Autobiography. London & c.: Longmans, Green 1938 Building Types (Civil) Finsbury borough Opening of the Finsbury Health Centre … 1938 [B. Lubetkin, architect] London 1938 Presented by the Architect.

pp. 165-179 The Next Twenty Years by Professor W.G. Holford [A.] A Paper read before the R.I.B.A. on Monday, 5 December 1938 The President, Mr. H.S. Goodhart-Rendel [F.] in the Chair p. 169 Belief in a Progressive Movement - … These include the problem of modern architectural research, the application of new scientific and technical resources to the problems of building, and their experimental integration in contemporary architecture. All modern work is experimental to some extent; and the man who makes a contribution to our architectural powers, who fuses method, materials, and building needs into a creative design, is making architectural history … it is necessary to state that there is such a thing as “the New Architecture.” p. 171 Two Methods of Teaching – … One of my colleagues at Liverpool said the other day that what caused such wholehearted championing of the doctrines of Le Corbusier was not so much a discriminating confidence in the works and dictums of the master, as a vague distrust of a large number of older men who never had a good word to say for him … p. 173 Present Reactions - … Well, steel is certainly the business man’s favourite material, it builds our factories and commercial houses; but brick and timber and the plastic possibilities of reinforced concrete appeal just as much, if not more, to the architect and artist of to-day. You will notice the last two particularly wherever they are at work, in bridges and Underground stations, in flats and country houses, in recreation buildings and seaside pavilions, at the airport and at the Zoo … Repairing the Foundations - … The President once remarked that one of the bad legacies of functionalism is a disregard of what is emotionally appropriate; he also pointed out that it had left one or two good legacies as well. Now, before functionalism is packed off to bed for good, let us remember that it is not a naughty child, personified for the time by Le Corbusier … The emotional symbolism of much modern architecture is bare to the point of poverty, and utilitarian and simple, and sometimes a little uncertain. But it is often sincere, and occasionally moving … p. 178 Discussion- Mr. Raymond Walker [L.]; … Some time ago I met Le Corbusier; he asked me the time. I did not know when I met him who he was. I told him the time in French, and he then told me in French that he thought Trafalgar Square was one of the loveliest squares in the world, “solide.” Shortly after that he got up to talk, and when he was introduced to the meeting as Le Corbusier I had the shock of my life, and I gave up modernism in architecture ever after … Mr. Erich Mendelsohn: … I do not agree with Mr. Raymond Walker when he told us that after he talked to Le Corbusier he gave up modern architecture. I should like to tell him that he should never have dared to take up modern architecture. Modern architecture is not an experiment for someone who likes or does not like it, but something which we have to feel within ourselves because it is part of our own life … pp. 180-185 A Client on his House by Geoffrey Walford No. 66 Frognal, Hampstead. Architects: Connell, Ward & Lucas [AA. & L.] … I find delight above all in the relation between house and garden, whereby the terraces and garden may be an extension of the interior of the house, and whereby the interior is screened rather than enclosed from the open air, trees and sky …

pp. 195-196 Review of Periodicals – 19 December 1938 Industrial – Building. 1938. December. P. 494. New buildings for Messrs. Boots Pure Drug Co. at Nottingham, by Sir E. Owen Williams. Transport – Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo). 1938. October. P. 18. Omnibus branch office and garage at Tokyo, by T. Naito. Law – Nippon Architect (Tokyo). 1938. October. P. 34 List of architects’ professional practice regulations in many countries, and reprint of a lecture on professional registration by E.S. Hall, secretary of the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards. General – Architectural Review. 1938. December. Excellent and very well illustrated special number on the Architecture of Leisure, written by Donald Pilcher [A.], and dealing with recreation parks, the theatre, music and the films, indoor and outdoor sports, park developments, community centres, holiday camps and hostels, roadside buildings, recreation and the countryside, week-end houses, and recreation and the seaside.

p. 216 Editorial – 9 January 1939 “Focus” – Publication of a second number of Focus has turned what might have been nothing more than a journalistic jeu d’esprit into an affair of some importance. It is not easy, however easy it may be to have ideas on the subject, to produce a paper in the crowded world of London architectural journalism …

pp. 217-222 Recent Swedish Architecture. Part I

p. 223 Municipal Small Houses in Sweden. Part II

p. 248 Review of Periodicals – 9 January 1939 General – N.A.S.A. Journal. 1938. December. This is the third number of the second volume. Run by the Northern Architectural Students’ Association, it is a good and sensible production, indicative of the growing movement amongst students towards a real sense of the responsibility of the profession … E. Maxwell Fry contributes an article on the development of the MARS Group … pp. 307-308 Review of Periodicals – 23 January 1939 Industrial – Architects’ Journal. 1938. 29 December. P. 1053. Extensions to the Boots factory, Beeston, by Sir E. Owen Williams. Welfare and Community Buildings Architectural Review. 1939. January. P. 5. Architects’ Journal. 1939. 12 January. P. 48. Architect and Building News. 1939. 13 January. P. 65. Finsbury Health Centre, by Tecton; a building co-ordinating all the health services, and containing clinics and treatment centres, offices for the Medical Officer of Health and Sanitary Inspector, lecture theatre, and cleansing and disinfecting stations. Religious – Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo). 1938. November. P. 10. Crematorium and funeral pavilion, Osaka City. Houses – Architectural Review. 1939. January. P. 29. Four houses by F.R.S. Yorke and Marcel Breuer [A.]. One at Angmering in concrete and brick, two at Eton in brick, and one at Lee-on-Solent in concrete. Focus. 1938. No. 2. P. 29. Timber house at Sutton, Sussex, by Connell, Ward & Lucas. [AA. and L.] Flats – Architects’ Journal. 1938. 29 December. P. 1067. Flats at 65 Ladbroke Grove, by E. Maxwell Fry [A.] Focus. 1938. No. 2. P. 65 Flats at Palace Gate, London by Wells Coates [F.], in course of construction. The section is on the “three-two” system, three service and bedroom floors occupying the same height as two living-room floors.

p. 310 Accessions to the Library – 23 January 1939 Town and Country Planning, Gardens, Rural Preservation Tunnard (Christopher) Gardens in the modern landscape. London: Archl. Press 1938

pp. 311-312 Obituaries – Charles Spooner

p. 313 Obituaries – Professor Bruno Taut by Walter Segal Professor Bruno Taut, the famous German architect, who died suddenly in Istanbul on 24 December, was one of the leading pioneers of the modern movement in Europe and a personality whose great artistic and literary activities were devoted to nearly all important problems of architecture and design … From 1933-36 he stayed in Japan, where he studied the arts and the culture of that country, and published several books about it … In Professor Taut one of the noblest men and finest artists has died.

pp. 325-331 The President’s Address to Students Delivered at the R.I.B.A. on Monday, 23 January, at 8.30 p.m.

p. 363 Alexander McGibbon – 6 February 1939 – Short Obituary b. 1861. Trained at Glasgow School of Art became director of the architectural department of the Glasgow School of Art.

pp. 408-409 Book Reviews – Houses and Furniture Your House and Mine by Geoffrey Boumphrey. London 1938 … the modernists, or so we are told, are perverting the delicate balance of architectural truths by trailing after sociology. In anthropology, however, archaeology and sociology, which start from opposite poles, meet to provide us and Mr. Boumphrey with a complete straight road to modern architecture as the expression in building of the thoughts that “are just those which the ordinary man in the street is accustomed to follow when he is concerned with anything to which he does not usually attribute beauty,” and that only when the principle has been followed “that the house should be shaped to suit the needs and habits of its owners by using to the best possible advantage all the knowledge and materials at the disposal of its builders has true beauty been achieved…” Mr. Boumphrey appears as a wholehearted supporter of modern architecture … The new world in which Mr. Boumphrey is so keen an evangelist is not a book writer’s dream: his broad conceptions of it are dependent neither on flat roofs nor opposition to the garden city idea; they grow out of the realities of architecture and life and can be achieved in a world where people can be allowed the consciousness that can only come from responsibility. Home Pride - Design and Decoration in the Home by Noel Carrington. Country Life 1938 This is described as a new edition of Mr. Carrington’s Design in the Home, published by Country Life in 1933. In effect it is an entirely new book with a new and shorter and less didactic text with new and definitely better illustrations. As the author says, in 1933 it was difficult to collect enough good contemporary furniture to fill the Dorland Hall exhibition of that year. Now there is ample, and evidence that “the use of contemporary materials in a logical manner has been generally accepted.” In every respect this is one of the best books on the subject …

p. 411 Review of Periodicals – 20 February 1939 Museums and Exhibitions – Pencil Points (New York). 1939. January. P. 3. Notes on the German Bauhaus, and the Bauhaus exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art. Houses – Architectural Review. 1939. February. P. 61. Timber house near Halland, Sussex by Serge Chermayeff [F.]. Garden architect, Christopher Tunnard. Profusely illustrated with photographs and drawings.

p. 413 Accessions to the Library – 1938-1939 – VII – 20 February 1939 Architecture – History Le Corbusier, pseud., and Jeanneret (P.) Oevre complete 1934-1938. Max Bill, ed. Textes par Le C-. [Eng. Trans. by A.J. Dakin] Zurich 1939

p. 431 Editorial – 6 March 1939 Mr. Frank Lloyd Wright’s Lectures at the R.I.B.A. Sulgrave Manor Board’s Watson Lectures for 1939 which Mr. Frank Lloyd Wright was to have given at the Royal Institute last November will be given on Tuesday, 2 May; Thursday, 4 May; Tuesday, 9 May; Thursday, 11 May. The first lecture on 2 May will be at 5.30 p.m., when the Chairman of the Sulgrave Manor Board and Mr. Goodhart-Rendel will welcome Mr. Frank Lloyd Wright on behalf of the Board and the R.I.B.A. The last three lectures will be at 8.30 p.m. Mr. Frank Lloyd Wright’s subject will be “Organic Architecture.” The Idea, the Movement, the Scene at Present and the Future. Further notices will be published in due course. Free tickets for reserved seats can be obtained on application to the Secretary, the Sulgrave Manor Board, 37 Charles Street, W.1. A good number of seats will be left unreserved.

pp. 464-465 Book Reviews – The New Landscape Architecture Gardens in the Modern Landscape by Christopher Tunnard London 1938 – Reviewed by W.A. Eden [A.] … He [Tunnard] has noticed, however, that “contemporary garden design has not even yet caught up with contemporary trends in architecture,” and he is determined that it shall “catch up.” The result is a surprising display of ingenuity in the use of such familiar cliches as “new materials and methods”; “sociological necessities,” and “outworn systems of aesthetic”; and many readers might be discouraged from finding the real nourishment in the book by these unnecessary condiments … The problem of seasonal changes is one that many people find extremely tantalising and a fuller treatment of this and other aspects of planting would have been useful …

p. 453 Obituary to Alexander McGibbon – 6 March 1939 … a very well-known figure in the architectural world at Glasgow and the West of Scotland (he may even have crossed the difficult bridge leading to the “wise men of the East”!) during the ‘nineties. pp. 485-499 Recent Architecture in the Provinces by William T. Benslyn [F.] Read before the R.I.B.A. on Monday, 6 March, Mr. H. Goodhart-Rendel [F.], in the Chair p. 488 Dudley … In recent years two exceptionally interesting pieces of architecture have been added to its attractions. The New Town Hall by Messrs. Harvey & Wicks and the Dudley Zoo buildings by Messrs. Tecton both show considerable individuality … The Dudley Castle Zoo by Messrs. Tecton has aroused great interest, especially among the younger members of the profession. The castle grounds, which are of considerable extent, provide good settings for these modern buildings; the colour of the reinforced concrete construction harmonises admirably with the local limestone and shale. The buildings show considerable imagination in their siting and planning, and this, combined with the modern character of the constructive methods used, gives a freshness and charm to the whole which is greatly enhanced by the beauty of the existing trees which in many instances from integral parts of the design. The balconies, terraces and staircase overlooking the bear bit provide a variety of observation points. The buildings and walls appear to grow out of and merge naturally into the pit they enclose and are notable for their plasticity of shape. The bird house is an isolated circular building surrounded externally with an observation terrace. The Restaurant is a simple single storey building with a flat roof in which full advantage has been taken of the method of columnar construction employed to fully glaze large portions of the enclosing surfaces. The entrance to it is emphasised by a parabolic shape formed in concrete. Altogether a stimulating and to me exiting group of buildings … p. 494 Schools … The Village College at Impington by Professor Gropius and Mr. Maxwell Fry was not completed when I visited it in December. It possesses many points of interest, but I am not convinced that the fan-shaped assembly hall has any advantages over the more normal rectangular shape. It did, however, involve the use of some very expensive specially shaped built-up steel girders to support the roof. I must confess that interesting as I found the whole job, I came away with the impression that undue insistence on the theory of simplicity can very easily produce practical complications. Entertainment … The De la Warr pavilion at Bexhill by Messrs. Mendelsohn & Chermayeff makes little concession to the commercial outlook, but is a notable contribution to the architecture of the seaside. Its cantilevers, glass enclosed staircases, flat roofs and terraces, are all in accord with the modern spirit of design, and it contrasts in no uncertain way with the rest of Bexhill. p. 495 Domestic Work … Many recent examples of modernity are well known to you through the technical press. I am therefore restricting myself to showing you a very charming interior of a house at Henfield by Messrs. Connell, Ward and Lucas, with its simple fireplace, bookcases, settee, carefully placed reading lamp, and vase, which I feel has great distinction. Also exterior and interior views of a house at Hatfield by Mr. F.R.S. Yorke, which, with its high living room partly clerestorey lighted, flat roofs, sun blinds, and simple cubical outline is typical of a small house in the modern manner.

p. 499 The Architects Registration Acts, 1931 and 1938

pp. 510-512 Timber House in Middlesex – Architect: Max Lock [A.] p. 512 … No plaster is used internally. Walls are lined with a 1/2 in. building board, and finished in the ground-floor living areas with Japanese grass cloth … The staircase is in Japanese oak … [some of the photographs used to illustrate article are reminiscent of traditional Japanese architecture]

p. 515 Book Reviews – The Facts of Life The Flat Book by J. L. Martin and S. Speight. London 1939 … All the plans are of the type of flat that can properly be described as “modern” rather than merely “contemporary” … The book is therefore the most complete catalogue in existence of up-to-date and well-designed equipment of every kind needed in a small house or a flat …

pp. 519-521 Accessions to the Library – 1938-1939 – VIII – 20 March 1939 Architecture – Theory Gloag (John) Word Warfare. Some aspects of German propaganda and English liberty. [Including use of architecture] London 1939 Building Types (Civil) - Architectural Review [Special number] The Architecture of leisure. [By Donald Pilcher] (Dec.) Lond. 1938 (Domestic) - Architects’ Journal [Special number: Flats.] (2 May) Lond. 1935. Allied Arts and Archaeology – Studio, publ. Decorative art. 1939. The S- Year book. C.G. Holme, ed. 1939 New York: Museum of Modern Art Bauhaus exhibition. (Bulletin, No. 6, Dec.) New York 1938 Town and Country Planning, Gardens, Rural Preservation Tunnard (Christopher) Gardens in the modern landscape. London: Archl. Press. 1938

p. 523 Obituaries – W. Osborne Keats [L.] Mr. Keats, whose death occurred on 12 November 1938, was born in 1872. He was articled to his father, Mr. J. H. Keats, of Plymouth. In 1902 Mr. Keats worked for the War Office, first in Plymouth and later for three years in Singapore. He then joined the staff of the Office of Works, Liberia, and after a period in Shanghai, he was appointed surveyor to the Asiatic Petroleum Co. there, until 1932, when he retired. Mr. Keat’s chief work was a semi-open-air church for lepers at Koh Klang, Siam. He was the author of Notes on Japanese House Construction and Materials.

pp. 537-548 George Walton His Life and Work by Nikolaus Pevsner p. 538 … He, probably more than anybody else, impressed the group of the “Glasgow Boys,” as they were called – Guthrie, Lavery, E.A. Walton, Roche, Cameron, Stevenson, Henry, Hornel, Paterson, Kennedy, Hamilton, Ferguson and other … E. A. Walton was George Walton’s brother … Mrs. Cranston deserves the art-historian’s unstinted gratitude, for in this first tea-room of hers she made Walton’s as well as Mackintosh’s name … p. 539 He designed glass for a firm called Clutha, for which at a much earlier date Christopher Dresser had worked … p. 543 II … George Walton’s name should never have been left out of a book on the pioneers of the modern movement. His designs, mainly those of 1895 to 1905, are amongst the most brilliant and historically most significant examples of the rapid and constructive progress of Britain away from William Morris towards a new style of the new century. p. 545 … In fact Walton stated in a letter to the Architectural Review, published only a few months before his death, that his work was “influenced considerably” by Whistler, and that “arrangement and colour” of Whistler’s exhibitions in London were “the most remarkable events of the time”. p. 548 … he stands precisely where his style places him, right in the middle between the Arts and Crafts and the Modern Movement.

p. 563 Frank Lloyd Wright’s Lectures … The Secretary of the Board has just been notified that Mr. Frank Lloyd Wright has changed the titles of the lectures to “An Organic Architecture : The Architecture of Democracy.” The particular titles of the four lectures will be: 1. “The Philosophy of that Architecture.” 2. “Its Social Implications.” 3. “The Practical Application to Date.” 4. “Exemplars and Technique.” The revised titles are more exciting than those first announced …

p. 584 Editorial – 24 April 1939 The Frank Lloyd Wright Lectures All the reserved seats for the Frank Lloyd Wright lectures have been taken, but over 200 seats have been left unreserved, and reserved seats, if not occupied at the time of the lecture, will be made generally available. Those who turn up early should have no difficulty in finding a place …

pp. 585-589 The Royal Gold Medal presentation to Mr. Percy E. Thomas O.B.E.

pp. 625-626 Book Reviews – Architecture as Propaganda Word Warfare: Some Aspects of German Propaganda and English Liberty by John Gloag … Mr. Gloag wisely selects the new Chancellery as typical. He says “It is no longer a skin, stretched lightly over steel bones: it has regained a medieval thickness of cuticle. The windows give the impression of being pierced in the wall …” In fact, Germany has gone back to thick walls and small windows, rigid proportions, and huge scale but without a trace of gaiety or freedom. Mr. Gloag sums it up well in a happy figure of speech: “… a civic architecture that is as static as a soldier standing to attention, and as dumb.” Modern Architectural Details Working Details. Vol. I, Domestic. Edited by Mildred W. White [A.] London: Architectural Press … Broadly speaking, all are examples of a self-reliant modern architecture that does not need the assistance of past design forms … Windows: a very significant element in modern design; all but two of the examples are from houses by Fry … The examples are with one or two exceptions well chosen to represent the best practice of some of the best modern architects …

p. 627 Review of Periodicals – 24 April 1939 Flats – Architectural Review. 1939. April. P. 173 Flats at Palace Gate, Kensington, by Wells Coates [F.]. Very fully illustrated. Observatories – Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo). 1939. February. PP. 1 and 13. The Osima Meteorological Observatory and the Imperial Marine Observatory, both by S. Horiguti[sic.].

p. 643 Editorial – 8 May 1939 Mr. Frank Lloyd Wright - … there can be few who did not feel the stimulating influence of Mr. Lloyd Wright’s “new Declaration of Independence” as he called his message; a liberation from the classic tradition and a return to the fundamental sense of architecture as organic, living and indigenous – grand words which Mr. Wright did not leave vague and undefined …

pp. 654-660 Railway Stations by Professor A.E. Richardson, A.R.A., F.S.A. [F.]

p. 686 Review of Periodicals – 8 May 1939 Sports Buildings – Kentiku[sic.] Zassi (Tokyo). 1939. P. 489 Large grandstand at Kyôto racecourse; fine cantilevered steel roof.

p. 687 Accession to the Library – 1938-1939 – X – 8 May 1939 Construction Chermayeff (Serge) Plan for A.R.P. A practical policy etc. Lond. 1939 Tecton, firm Planned A.R.P. Based on the investigation …in…Finsbury. Lond.: Arch. Press. 1939

p. 700 Editorial – 22 May 1939 Mr. Frank Lloyd Wright’s visit is now over, and the London architectural world, a bit dazed perhaps, is looking around to see how many of its old beliefs, or new ones, too, remain intact after the big bang. By the force of his personality, and the force of his provocative ideas, Mr. Lloyd Wright succeeded in making us stop and listen and think out quite a lot of things anew. It is too early to gauge how deep are the sympathies that have been made to exist between London modernism and Taliesin. The whole argument has, as it were, been left in the air. The atmosphere of the meetings somehow was inimical to coherent and constructive discussion; probably there never can be really good discussion at meetings so large and so charged with feeling! …

p. 740 Review of Periodicals – 22 May 1939 Biographical – Architects’ Journal. 1939. 4 May. P. 731. Article on “Frank Lloyd Wright’s Peaceful Penetration of Europe,” by Nikolaus Pevsner. Arkady (Warsaw). 1939. No. 2. P, 71. Article on Frank Lloyd Wright, with numerous illustrations of Taliesin and Honeycomb House.

p. 743 Correspondence – Mr. Frank Lloyd Wright’s Visit Comments from P. Morley-Horder [F.] … Mr. Lloyd Wright asserts that “a house is a machine in which to live, but architecture begins where the concept of the house ends.” “Architecture expresses human life, machines do not, nor does any appliance whatsoever. Appliances only serve life.” Dicta of this kind abound in his lectures …

p. 756 Editorial – 12 June 1939 An exhibition of “Garden and Landscape,” organised by the Institute of Landscape Architects, will be opened by the Hon. David Bowes-Lyon at the R.I.B.A. on Wednesday, 21 June, at 3 p.m. … has as its theme “Recreation,” and the illustrations cover all aspects of landscape architecture …

pp. 776-782 The British Pavilion – New York World’s Fair Architects: Stanley Hall & Easton and Robertson [FF.] The British Pavilion at New York is the largest that has been erected by Great Britain in any international exhibition …

p. 786 The Three Architects – A play by Hope Bagenal [A.], performed by the R.I.B.A. Dramatic Society on 20 and 22 May … The architectural setting is not extraneous to the subject, but provides a natural medium for bringing out the conflicting ideals with the right emphasis. These are personified in the characters of the three architects – the senior partner, old Sir John Mercier, R.A., F.R.I.B.A., represents the classic, contemplative tradition, which believes in “sitting quietly and letting everything irrelevant go by.” The young Jewish refugee, full of fire and creative force, bring out the transcendental idealism that looks only towards a future which shall have no link with past or present. Sir John’s partner, Gilbert Gilbertson, F.R.I.B.A., stands somewhere between the two, and is typical of the present generation in that he can see both sides with equal force, but cannot decide which course should be his …

pp. 788-789 Book Reviews – Contemporary House Architecture The Book of the Modern House – A Panoramic Survey of Contemporary Domestic Design edited by Patrick Abercrombie. London 1939 reviewed by William G. Newton [F.] This is a selective survey, as Professor Abercrombie describes it, of our domestic architecture of the last twenty years … Its four hundred pages offer an evidently miscellaneous entertainment. The austerely logical may feel a little impatient that, in a “panoramic survey of contemporary domestic design,” one of the fourteen chapters should be specifically labelled “the contemporary house” … the flat-roofed house, with its unshackled plan, is re-embodying that sense of excitement, of adventure, in building (look at Jolwynds, or the Kingston house, or Shipwights [Wells Coates], or the shadowed decks of Carlyon Bay) … R.S.B. [Royal Society of British Sculptors] Modern British Sculpture. London: Country Life. 1938 … The principal regret of the architect will be that too few of these sculptures have been designed as essential adornments of buildings or as features of public squares or gardens. So many are isolated pieces, while some of the fragmentary studies, interesting and beautiful as they are, must be purely academic in purpose. These artists could and should be contributing far more to the beauty of present-day architecture and it is architects who are largely to blame for this lack of opportunity …

p. 792 Review of Periodicals – 12 June 1939 Recreation Buildings – Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo). 1939. April. Fine horse race stadium at Kyoto, by T. Yasui.

p. 794 Accessions to the Library – 12 June 1939 Building Science – Proofing Imamura (Akitune) Theoretical and applied seismology. (D. Kennedy, trans.) Tokyo: Maruzen. 1937

p. 795 Correspondence – A.R.P. Publications Letter from Tecton regarding the review of their recent publication.

pp. 803-804 Editorial – 26 June 1939 The Garden and Landscape Exhibition – … the I.L.A. [Institute of Landscape Architects] is not a body of people whose chief interest is in preserving the past, they like architects, are building the future landscape. The Exhibition shows how the ideas of the leading landscape architects are moving. It is brilliantly clear in its exposition and is fresh and lively …

pp. 813-819 The All-Europe House designed by Elizabeth Denby Garden Layout and Planting by Christopher Tunnard A scheme for mixed development with flats in central areas, at a density of twenty houses to the acre.

pp. 835-836 Book Reviews – The Bauhaus Spirit – reviewed by E. Maxwell Fry [A] Bauhaus, 1919-1928 edited by Herbert Bayer, Walter Gropius, Ise Gropius. London: Allen & Unwin. 1939 The New Vision by L. Moholy Nagy. London: Faber & Faber. … Gropius’ analysis of the structure within which creative freedom might be found in the contemporary world was imaginative and sensitive over the whole range of possible action. Furthermore, and it was in this that the Bauhaus succeeded where individuals in various parts of the world failed, it concerned itself with the utmost modesty with what took place within the individual. He realised that it is not possible to teach architecture or to teach any art, and that experience may be only transmitted from one who has to others who are capable of receiving providing the atmosphere is charged with the necessary tension … Such education in England seems to me to be still too formal and academic, too competitive, divorced from industry and building, still canalised in its profession and with vast areas of artistic unawareness. And above all it lacks that high quality which distinguished the Bauhaus. The young people among us feel this strongly, not only in London where this might be expected, but in the provincial centres, the responsiveness of the contemporary student to new stimuli being an index of our need for a recasting of educational machinery. With this in our minds the history of the Bauhaus is a document of the very highest value, because while it gives an account of the building up of a curriculum, this account is impregnated with the spirit of the fine intelligences which gave it life … Paint A Handbook of Paint: Colour and Controversy; Colour and the Interior Decoration by John Betjeman. Colour and the Architect by Hugh Casson. Colour and the Builder. Silicate Paint Co. London. 1939 These two little books set a new style and quality in advertising literature, and the company that has had the intelligence (or bravery) to employ Mr. Betjeman and Mr. Casson to discuss the use of colour and Mr. Robert Harling to design the typography of their booklets deserves attention from architects. Both the essays in the Handbook of Paint are lively and provocative, but they are also full of good advice. Mr. Betjeman ends with several general rules, not all orthodox – he would have even “olde worlde” beams painted white …

p. 839 Review of Periodicals – 26 June 1939 Landscape Design – Landscape and Garden. 1939. Spring. P. 23. Article by Christopher Tunnard on his collaboration with S. Chermayeff [F.] over the planning of the garden to the latter’s house at Halland, Sussex. Landscape and Garden. 1939. Spring. P. 37 Article on garden design in relation to modern architecture, by Maxwell Fry [A.]

p. 940 Book Reviews Flats, Municipal and Private Enterprise. publd. By Ascot Gas Water Heaters. London. 1939 This is a good advertising publication which architects should find a useful index to the best recent flat building in England … Mr. Wells Coates damns almost the whole of contemporary building in a chapter on dwellings for to-morrow, which is, by the way, an extremely good general theorisation of the bases of modern architecture. Finally, in this introductory series of chapters, Mr. Fry and Miss Denby describe Kensal House.

pp. 942-943 Accessions to the Library – 1938-1939 – XV – 14 August 1939 Architecture – Wright (Frank Lloyd) Lectures. (Sulgrave Manor Board, Sir George Watson lectures. Delivered at R.I.B.A.) (Reporter’s notes. With pref. By F- L- W-.) 1939. Building Types (Civil) Exposition Internationale, Paris, 1937 (Arts et Techniques, etc.) Le Guide official. Paris. 1937. Hastings (Alan), ed. Week-end houses, cottages and bungalows. London: Archl. Press. 1939.

pp. 979-980 Book Reviews – Houses for Leisure Week-end Houses, Cottages and Bungalows edited by Alan Hastings, with introduction by Hugh Casson. London: Arch. Press. 1939. There have been more pot-boiling wretched books published on small houses than on any other section of contemporary architecture – a fact which the taste of the ignorant public is presumably responsible (that at least is a defence beneath which architects can shelter uneasily): it is therefore pleasant to welcome a good book on small houses, well-chosen examples, well presented … Small Houses in England Country Life Book of Small Houses edited by R. Smithells. London: Country Life. 1939 … The quality of the photographs is deplorably below Country Life’s standard, some are just bad exposures, others are taken from bad view-points, some are badly made-up … the quality of the book is in accordance with its low price …

pp.1005-1006 To the Fifty-Eighth – Mr. Frank Lloyd Wright Replies If printed reactions to my talks in London – no speaker really – which should have reached me there but now reach me at Taliesin mean anything, I have succeeded in getting myself misunderstood and well disliked, especially by those who should have been quick to understand me … Is the idea that good architecture must be, first of all, good building and the architect a master-builder first and an aesthetician afterwards – heresy? Is the idea that good community life is the life of the individual raised to the nth power rather than the life of the individual reduced to the lowest common denominator – idealistic hallucination? Cake? In this connection I ask M.A.R.S. . . . again . . . which came first – hen or egg? Well – if egg is the Idea then the egg came first – and, just so – society. First the great Individual (the Idea or Egg) then Society (the Hen). After that what have you? … I love Romance as I love sentiment. But just as I dislike sentimentality I would dislike their “Romance.” I suggest you put a gently sloping roof on any Le Corbusier or Gropius just to see what you have left of the so-called International Style after proper deductions have been made … Have I “changed” because I used to say the machine is the artist’s tool and now say that man should use the machine and not the machine use man? … I accept that backwash as European reaction on the way towards the “International Style”: a style that could never be Democratic because it is the use of man by the machine. Are “they” striving to perfect that? … I began my work as architect by sensibly accepting the machine as the creative artist’s inevitable tool believing that only where such as he had it in control could it prove a blessing instead of a curse. I saw the consequences of machinery … Le Corbusier, Gropius, et al, are yet where I stood in 1900. I do not recant nor resign the position I then took but I have experienced my own philosophy. I have seen it taking partial effect by way of the generations following me. What I started to do, with high faith, and confidence in human-creative force, I see giving way to certain sterilising factors in my original equation … I said that the only way man can use his machine and keep alive what is best in him is to go by means of it to the larger freedom the machine makes possible … Do I continue to befog the issue? If so the Machine itself will prove me right. Meantime I can wait and work. R.I.B.A. Journal Volume 47 : November 1939 – October 1940 p. 17 Correspondence – Frank Lloyd Wright Letter from John Gloag [Hon. A.] Dear Sir, - I had sailed for the United States before Mr. Frank Lloyd Wright had concluded his visit, so I was unable to follow all the reactions here to his lectures; but among a few ill-informed and vocal exponents of what used to be called “the modern movement” (which ceased to move a long time ago in the matter of imagination) I detect a tendency to belittle Mr. Wright’s influence, and to suggest that he is merely a romantic … It would perhaps have been better if he [Lloyd Wright] had confined his reply to the statement that he had outgrown “functionalist” childishness about 1900. That is the real answer to his uncomprehending critics.

pp. 39-40 Review of Periodicals – 11 December 1939 Libraries – Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo). 1939. No. 8. P. 33. Article by Harold A. Dod [F.] on the growth of the modern library. Houses – Wood. 1939. September. P. 394. Timber house at Sutton, Sussex, by Connell, Ward & Lucas. [AA.] Architectural Forum (New York). 1939. August. P. 142. “The Ardmore Experiment,” four-family speculative houses, by Frank Lloyd Wright.

p. 44 Correspondence – Frank Lloyd Wright Criticism from Patrick Abercombie … Mr. Gloag is really to blame. For years he has punctuated nearly all of his delightful writings and talks on architecture with the three magic monosyllables; he had built up a wonderful legend, and then when the Prophet was to be displayed, Mr. Gloag skipped off to America without acting as producer, with that inimitable flair for publicity for others which he possesses. Never has a Prophet been worse treated by his disciple … No, sir, I repeat that Mr. Gloag is to blame for the misunderstanding that quite naturally occurred. He should either have kept Mr. Wright, a mythical figure, in his remote Arizona, or he should have carefully staged and produced him. Let us hope that in the book which we have been promised Mr. Wright will be able to demonstrate that he is a coherent thinker as well as a logical architect.

p. 88 Review of Periodicals – 19 February 1940 Schools – Architectural Review. December. P. 225. The Village College, Impington, Cambridgeshire (the fourth in that county) by Walter Gropius [Hon. Corr. Mem.] and E. Maxwell Fry [F.], one of the most important buildings, architecturally and educationally, recently built in England. Houses – Architectural Review. 1939. November. P. 189. Houses in America by Gropius & Breuer, Neutra and Pfisterer, and Lescaze. Flats – Architectural Record (New York). 1939. November. P. 28. Two blocks of apartment flat illustrating the principle of the “duplex” (two-dimensional) and “3-dimensional” units – i.e., with tenancies each penetrating two or three storeys, the lifts stopping only at intermittent floors, plan economies being claimed for the arrangement. The first block is at Milwaukee, “duplex,” by H.W. Tullgren, and J.E. Quinn, consultant; the second (“3-dimensional”) at Palace Gate, London, by Wells Coates [F.]

p. 97 Editorial – 18 March 1940 Charles Annesley Voysey, Royal Gold Medallist Almost forty years ago Muthesius, the great German historian of English 19th-century domestic architecture, wrote: “Among all the busy London architects Voysey is without doubt the outstanding individual artist. His courage in seeking for the new and his success in achieving a personal art of his own in the conservatism of the London architectural world is as singular as it is refreshing” …

p. 101 Two Exhibitions There are two good exhibitions in London now, both concerned with evacuation or problems which evacuation has accentuated. At the Housing Centre, until 21 March, is an exhibition called The Homes They Come From which shows mostly by photographs and some brilliant bitter drawings what background there was to the lives of so many of the parents and children who left the big cities at the start of the war … The second exhibition, at 94 Wimpole Street, is of proposals for evacuation and holiday camps prepared under the auspices of the A.A.S.T.A. by Mr. Erno Goldfinger, Miss Mary Crowley [A.] and Miss Anne Parker [A.] …

p. 102 Photograph of Mr. C.F.A. Voysey [F.], Royal Medallist 1940

p. 111 Accessions to the Library – 1939-1940 – I – 18 March 1940 Architecture – Institute of Japanese Architects (Kentiku-Gakkai[sic.]) [Year-book:] … 14th year. Tokyo 1929 Wright (Frank Lloyd) An Organic architecture. The architecture of democracy. (Sulgrave Manor Board: Sir George Watson lectures for 1939) Lond.: Lund Humphries. 1939 [1940] Voysey (C.F.A.) Tradition & individuality in art. [Unpubd.] Presented by the Author [F.]. Gill (Eric) Sacred and secular in art and industry. A lecture … Royal Institution, London. Newport, Rhode Island: John Stevens. 1939 Presented by the Author. p. 113 New York World’s Fair, 1939 Guide to the pavilion of the United Kingdom, [and British dominions and colonies]. 1939 Presented. (Educational) – Bayer (Herbert), Gropius (Walter and Ise), editors Bauhaus 1919 1928. [Weimar and Dessau.] Lond.: Geo. Allen & Unwin. 1939 (Domestic) – Voysey (C.F.A.) The English Home. (Paper read to the Design Club.) (In The British Architect, 27 Jan.) Presented by the Author [F.]. Lancaster (Osbert) Homes sweet homes. Lond.: John Murray. 1939.

p. 158 Accessions to the Library – 15 April 1940 Town and Country Planning, Gardens, Rural Preservation Harvard University: Library of the Departments of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning A Selected list of references on Japanese landscape design. [Cambridge, Mass.] 1940

pp. 172-173 Book Reviews – “A Spot of Time” An Introduction to Modern Architecture by J. M. Richards. Lond. 1940 The New Architecture (Die Neue Architektur, La Nouvelle Architecture), by Alfred Roth. Zurich. Dr. H. Girsberger. 1940 Eric Mendelsohn by Arnold Whittick. London. Faber & Faber. 1940 … During the last 20 years, in which time modern architecture (whatever its virtues and vices) has established itself as the outstanding architecture of almost all of the progressive democracies, there has been a constant flow of books and articles about it but, strange to say, never before Mr. Richards’ Pelican Introduction to Modern Architecture has there been a simple, clear, general book on the subject for the English public. There have been books on modern houses and on other special types of buildings and there have been discursive arguments for a new architecture and some shorter critical studies, the best being Prof. Russell Hitchcock’s introduction to the Museum of Modern Art English Architecture Exhibition … The book by Alfred Roth has been in preparation for many years and, like Mr. Richards’ book, comes out rather unfortunately just too late for its full contribution to be realised … Mr. Richards and Mr. Roth have given us two of the most important books on modern architecture yet written – too late alas for their full effect to be felt because not even in those countries nominally at peace can there be much architectural activity … The movement of architectural thought must retain a continuity through the war which will not make useless the work of those who were building and reasoning in the inter-war period and who seemed just before war began to be evolving a coherent contemporary architecture. For us now the pre-war period is “a spot on time” that has not lost its renovating virtue …

pp. 177-179 Review of Periodicals – 20 May 1940 Museums, Libraries – Architectural Record (New York). 1939. Dec., p. 31: Zoo at Dudley Castle, Staffs; Tecton, architects. Houses – Form (Stockholm), 1940, No. 1, p. 9: Gropius house in America, by himself & Breuer. Builder, 1940 Feb. 23, p. 234: Four-family houses – the “Ardmore experiment” by Frank Lloyd Wright. Institutes, Hotels, Hostels – Kentiku[sic.] Zassi (Jnl. of Institute of Japanese Architects), 1940 Jan. (No. 658), p. 93: Hotel in Japan planned on semi-European lines. Architectural Review, Mar., p. 79: Girls’ hostel (Cecil Residential Club), Gower Street, by E. Maxwell Fry [F.] History and Biography – Journal of the Royal Society of Arts, 1940 Mar. 22, p. 449: Architecture 1919-1939: illustrated review of the inter-war period, by Howard Robertson [F.] Architect and Building News, 1940 Feb. 23, p. 196; Architects’ Journal, 1940 Feb. 29, p. 234; Builder, 1940 Feb. 23, p. 237: Illustrations and notes of the work of C.F.A. Voysey [F.].

p. 193 Book Reviews – Some Other Books – Earthquakes Theoretical and Applied Seismology by Akitune Imamura. Maruzen & Co.

pp. 196-197 Accessions to the Library – 1939-1940 – II – 17 June 1940 Architecture – Richards (J.M.) An Introduction to modern architecture. (Pelican books.) Harmondsworth: Penguin Books. 1940 Roth (Alfred) La Nouvelle architecture. – Die neue architekur. – The new architecture. Zurich: Girsberger. 1940 Whittick (Arnold) Eric [or Erich] Mendelsohn. Lond.: Faber & Faber. 1940 Allied Arts and Archaeology – Studio, journal Special spring numbers: 1939. Sculpture of to-day. C.G. Holme, ed. Commentary by Stanley Casson. Lond. 1939

pp. 208-210 Obituary – Sir Raymond Unwin

p. 219 Review of Periodicals – 15 July 1940 Welfare: Hospitals, &c. – Hospital and Nursing Home Management, 1940, Apl., p. 75: Tuberculosis sanatoria and clinics: addresses by a doctor and by B. Lubetkin (of Tecton) with one plan.

p. 241 Review of Periodicals – 19 August 1940 A.R.P. – Kentiku[sic.] Zassi (Journal of Institute of Japanese Architects) (Tokyo), 1940 Mar., p. 212: Camourflage: article by S. Hosino, with isometrics and models illustrating different methods.

pp. 257-258 Review of Periodicals – 16 September 1940 Transport – Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo), 1940 June, p. 1. Netta Maru, N.Y.K. New passenger liner designed by Nagasaki Dockyard. Interesting modern equipment and finishes. Colleges, Technical Schools, Laboratories – Kentiku[sic.] Sekai (Tokyo), 1940 May, p. 1: Technical high school, Tokyo; by T. Kurata. Houses – Pencil Points, 1940 June, p. 332: The Japanese house: recent examples illustrated, with article by Ralph Walker. Interiors, Details, Crafts, Fittings – Country Life, 1940 Aug. 24, p. 166: Roofs: aesthetics of flat and pitched types discussed by Christopher Hussey in an article, The Englishman’s home: the destiny of the roof-tree. Kentiku[sic.] Zassi (Journal of the Institute of Japanese Architects), 1940 June, p. 431: Chinese architecture: recent trends, article with small photos by Takeo Satô. Studio, 1940 Sept., p. 90: The romance of American architecture; illustrated short article by Howard Robertson [F.]

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